68 episodes

Who Makes Cents?: A History of Capitalism Podcast is a monthly program devoted to bringing you quality, engaging stories that explain how capitalism has changed over time. We interview historians and social and cultural critics about capitalism’s past, highlighting the political and economic changes that have created the present. Each episode gives voice to the people who have shaped capitalism – by making the rules or by breaking them, by creating economic structures or by resisting them.

Who Makes Cents?: A History of Capitalism Podcast Jessica Levy

    • History
    • 5.0, 1 Rating

Who Makes Cents?: A History of Capitalism Podcast is a monthly program devoted to bringing you quality, engaging stories that explain how capitalism has changed over time. We interview historians and social and cultural critics about capitalism’s past, highlighting the political and economic changes that have created the present. Each episode gives voice to the people who have shaped capitalism – by making the rules or by breaking them, by creating economic structures or by resisting them.

    Episode 68: Augustine Sedgewick on the Dark Empire of Coffee

    Episode 68: Augustine Sedgewick on the Dark Empire of Coffee

    Augustine Sedgewick speaks about his new book, Coffeeland: One Man’s Dark Empire and the Making of Our Favorite Drug, revealing how coffee spread to Europe and the New World alongside industrialization and European imperialism, transforming whole societies in the process. In doing so, Sedgewick tells a story that is about much more than coffee, integrating histories of labor, food, business, and imperialism to reveal how global capitalism creates disconnections, as well as connections.

    • 42 min
    Paige Glotzer on How the Suburbs Were Segregated

    Paige Glotzer on How the Suburbs Were Segregated

    It will come as little surprise that America’s metropolitan areas are racially segregated and unequal. Existing explanations for this tend to focus on governmental policies and consumer behavior during the New Deal and immediate post-war period. Our guest, Paige Glotzer, however, situates American suburbs in a longer history of exclusionary practices dating back to the 19th century. In doing so, she also ties the American suburb to a broader history of racial capitalism and white settler colonialism.

    • 44 min
    Marcia Chatelain on McDonalds and Black America

    Marcia Chatelain on McDonalds and Black America

    We’ve all heard the statistics regarding Americans and fast food. Not everyone has the same relationship with fast food. In this episode, we speak with Marcia Chatelain about  the dramatic impact one fast food company, McDonald’s, has had on black communities and black politics.

    Marcia Chatelain is a Provost’s Distinguished Associate Professor of History and African American Studies at Georgetown University. She is the author of Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America.

    • 29 min
    Big Changes at Who Makes Cents

    Big Changes at Who Makes Cents

    David and Alex are retiring from the show! But a new host is joining to take the reins. Listen to hear the founding co-hosts reflect on the past six years of the show and to meet our new host, Jessica Levy.

    • 36 min
    Zach Carter on Keynesianism and COVID-19

    Zach Carter on Keynesianism and COVID-19

    Today, we have a special episode. We speak to Zach Carter about COVID-19 and Keyesnianism. Zach is the author of the upcoming book The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes. 
    On Wednesday March 18th, he published an op-ed on Keynes's ideas for today.
    If you like this episode, please donate to Mariame Kaba's redistribution, mutual aid fund: https://www.paypal.com/pools/c/8npOgwIczH
    Zach Carter is a senior reporter at HuffPost, where he covers Congress, the White House, and economic policy. He is a frequent guest on cable news and news radio, and his written work has also appeared in The New Republic, The Nation, and The American Prospect, among other outlets. His story, “Swiped: Banks, Merchants and Why Washington Doesn’t Work for You” was included in the Columbia Journalism Review’s compilation Best Business Writing. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

    • 30 min
    Dara Orenstein on the Economic Geography of Warehouses

    Dara Orenstein on the Economic Geography of Warehouses

    Dara Orenstein on the Economic Geography of Warehouses
    If you’re like many people throughout the country and world, you’ve purchased something on Amazon. As a result, you’ve been incorporated into a set of supply chain relationships that inevitably pass through warehouses. On this episode, we return to topic we’ve discussed in past episodes—how logistics shapes capitalism. We speak to Dara Orenstein about the history of bonded warehouses specifically and foreign trade zones. We consider how taxes, tariffs, and legal locations have been a critical component in many of the products we buy and make.
    Dara Orenstein is an Associate Professor of American Studies at George Washington University. She is author of Out of Stock: The Warehouse in the History of Capitalism 

    • 58 min

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