100 episodes

Do you want to learn how to write for children? The Institute of Children's Literature has taught hundreds of thousands of aspiring writers, and the director of ICL is the host of Writing for Children. Bestselling children's author Katie Davis focuses on the craft of writing for children: how to write a children’s book, how to write for children’s magazines, how to get paid, and get published. There are listener questions, with answers from the experts at the Institute, plus hard-to-find resources and links included in every week's show notes. If you want to learn about how to get into children's publishing, Listen!

Writing for Children Katie Davis

    • Books

Do you want to learn how to write for children? The Institute of Children's Literature has taught hundreds of thousands of aspiring writers, and the director of ICL is the host of Writing for Children. Bestselling children's author Katie Davis focuses on the craft of writing for children: how to write a children’s book, how to write for children’s magazines, how to get paid, and get published. There are listener questions, with answers from the experts at the Institute, plus hard-to-find resources and links included in every week's show notes. If you want to learn about how to get into children's publishing, Listen!

    Misunderstood Verbs | Writing for Children 188

    Misunderstood Verbs | Writing for Children 188

    MISUNDERSTOOD VERBS
    When you’re polishing and perfecting your work, one big thing to pay attention to is your verbs. Inspired by an article from Jan Fields, we’re going to come to a greater understanding of these action words.
    Verbs are the powerhouse of the sentence. Because of that, understanding how verbs work will help you tremendously in the revision process. It's only by knowing what verbs are all about that you can make them do their tricks. So with that in mind, let's look at some of the most misunderstood verbs.
    Check out our amazing new self-led course, Revision Power at writingforchildren.com/revisionpower

    • 9 min
    10 Things That Make Editors Cringe | Writing for Children 187

    10 Things That Make Editors Cringe | Writing for Children 187

    10 THINGS THAT MAKE EDITORS CRINGE
    Nobody wants to make an editor (or anyone) cringe when they read your manuscript. Inspired by a post from Jamie K. Schmidt, we’re covering 10 things that make editors cringe and tips to avoid them. Be sure to head to writingforchildren.com/187 to download the show notes because many of these tips will be easier to see in writing.
    Everybody knows to use spellcheck or Grammarly when going over their writing. However, some mistakes aren’t generally caught by these two programs. And if you want to stop an editor’s eyes from rolling to the back of her head, you should check your writing for these errors.
    Check out our amazing new self-led course, Revision Power at writingforchildren.com/revisionpower

    • 13 min
    Andrea Loney | Writing for Children 186

    Andrea Loney | Writing for Children 186

    INTERVIEW WITH ANDREA LONEY
    At the end of January, the American Library Association announced their annual awards. DOUBLE BASS BLUES illustrated by Rudy Gutierrez and written by Andrea J. Loney was named a Caldecott Honor Book! Andrea was our guest last year, so in honor of her book's big win, we're rebroadcasting her interview with some bonus audio as she shares her tips for getting from unstuck to success.
    Check out our amazing new self-led course, Revision Power at writingforchildren.com/revisionpower

    • 50 min
    Newbery Medalist Jerry Craft | Writing for Children 185

    Newbery Medalist Jerry Craft | Writing for Children 185

    NEWBERY MEDALIST JERRY CRAFT
    This week, the American Library Association honored Jerry Craft with the Newbery Medal for his graphic novel NEW KID! To celebrate the first graphic novel to ever receive the Newbery, we're rebroadcasting our interview with Jerry from last year where he talked about his inspiration for the book and how he used real-life experiences to give authenticity to the story.
    Check out our amazing new self-led course, Revision Power at writingforchildren.com/revisionpower

    • 20 min
    Finding Your Character's Childlike Voice | Writing for Children 184

    Finding Your Character's Childlike Voice | Writing for Children 184

    A CHILDLIKE VOICE
    Kids are far more discerning than many writers suspect. They know a "fake kid" when they hear one, so your dialogue must feel like real words spoken by a real kid. At the same time, it cannot include all the affectations (um, so like, um, what?) that might be part of real speech but would drag the story down. So how do you learn how to write real dialogue? Glad you asked. Here is a three-step process that will help you transform your dialogue.
    Check out our amazing new self-led course, Revision Power at writingforchildren.com/revisionpower

    • 9 min
    The Big Effect of Dialogue Attribution | Writing for Children 183

    The Big Effect of Dialogue Attribution | Writing for Children 183

    COMBATING THE BORING SPEECH TAG
    Dialogue is the favorite part of story writing for many authors. In dialogue writing, the author is able to give voice to the people the author created. Tag we're going to dig into the bits that tag along with the dialogue: speech tags and narrative action. How important is that? And how varied? We'll be reading through examples so be sure to download this week's show notes at writingforchildren.com/183 so you can see the examples as you apply these techniques to your own work.
    Check out our amazing new self-led course, Revision Power at writingforchildren.com/revisionpower

    • 10 min

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