64 episodes

Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

Breaking Math Podcast Breaking Math Podcast

    • Mathematics

Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    RR30: The Abyss (Part One; Black Holes; Rerun)

    RR30: The Abyss (Part One; Black Holes; Rerun)

    Sofia is still recovering from eye surgery, so this will be a rerun. We'll probably be back next week.

    The idea of something that is inescapable, at first glance, seems to violate our sense of freedom. This sense of freedom, for many, seems so intrinsic to our way of seeing the universe that it seems as though such an idea would only beget horror in the human mind. And black holes, being objects from which not even light can escape, for many do beget that same existential horror. But these objects are not exotic: they form regularly in our universe, and their role in the intricate web of existence that is our universe is as valid as the laws that result in our own humanity. So what are black holes? How can they have information? And how does this relate to the edge of the universe?

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch]


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    • 54 min
    RR24: Language and Entropy (Information Theory in Language; Rerun)

    RR24: Language and Entropy (Information Theory in Language; Rerun)

    Sofia is still recovering from eye surgery, so this will be a rerun.

    Information theory was founded in 1948 by Claude Shannon, and is a way of both qualitatively and quantitatively describing the limits and processes involved in communication. Roughly speaking, when two entities communicate, they have a message, a medium, confusion, encoding, and decoding; and when two entities communicate, they transfer information between them. The amount of information that is possible to be transmitted can be increased or decreased by manipulating any of the aforementioned variables. One of the practical, and original, applications of information theory is to models of language. So what is entropy? How can we say language has it? And what structures within language with respect to information theory reveal deep insights about the nature of language itself?


    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch]

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    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 47 min
    P3: Radiativeforcenado (Radiative Forcing)

    P3: Radiativeforcenado (Radiative Forcing)

    Learn more about radiative forcing, the environment, and how global temperature changes with atmospheric absorption with this Problem Episode about you walking your (perhaps fictional?) dog around a park.  This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org.

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch]


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    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 41 min
    46: Earth Irradiated (the Greenhouse Effect)

    46: Earth Irradiated (the Greenhouse Effect)

    Since time immemorial, blacksmiths have known that the hotter metal gets, the more it glows: it starts out red, then gets yellower, and then eventually white. In 1900, Max Planck discovered the relationship between an ideal object's radiation of light and its temperature. A hundred and twenty years later, we're using the consequences of this discovery for many things, including (indirectly) LED TVs, but perhaps one of the most dangerously neglected (or at least ignored) applications of this theory is in climate science. So what is the greenhouse effect? How does blackbody radiation help us design factories? And what are the problems with this model?

    This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org.

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch]


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    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 44 min
    45: Climate Denialism and Cranky Uncles (Interview with John Cook of Skeptical Science)

    45: Climate Denialism and Cranky Uncles (Interview with John Cook of Skeptical Science)

    Climate change is an issue that has become frighteningly more relevant in recent years, and because of special interests, the field has become muddied with climate change deniers who use dishonest tactics to try to get their message across. The website SkepticalScience.com is one line of defense against these messengers, and it was created and maintained by a research assistant professor at the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University, and both authored and co-authored two books about climate science with an emphasis on climate change. He also lead-authored a 2013 award-winning paper on the scientific consensus on climate change, and in 2015, he developed an open online course on climate change denial with the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland. This person is John Cook.

    This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org.

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch; John Cook]


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    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 27 min
    44: Vestigial Math (Math That Is Not Used like It Used to Be)

    44: Vestigial Math (Math That Is Not Used like It Used to Be)

    Mathematics, like any intellectual pursuit, is a constantly-evolving field; and, like any evolving field, there are both new beginnings and sudden unexpected twists, and things take on both new forms and new responsibilities. Today on the show, we're going to cover a few mathematical topics whose nature has changed over the centuries. So what does it mean for math to be extinct? How does this happen? And will it continue forever?

    This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org.

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 37 min

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