89 episodes

Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new!

*See our new math and science youtube show called "Turing Rabbit Holes" at youtube.com/turingrabbitholespodcast ! The Breaking Math Podcast team has teamed up with Particle Physicist and Science Fiction Author Dr. Alex Alaniz to deliver a show about science and society. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

Breaking Math Podcast Breaking Math Podcast

    • Science

Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new!

*See our new math and science youtube show called "Turing Rabbit Holes" at youtube.com/turingrabbitholespodcast ! The Breaking Math Podcast team has teamed up with Particle Physicist and Science Fiction Author Dr. Alex Alaniz to deliver a show about science and society. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    RR36: The Most Boring Episode Ever (Rerun: Math Games)

    RR36: The Most Boring Episode Ever (Rerun: Math Games)

    This is a rerun of one of our favorite episodes! We hope that you enjoy it if you haven't listened to it yet. We'll be back next week with new content! Thank you so much for listening to Breaking Math!

    Math is a gravely serious topic which has been traditionally been done by stodgy people behind closed doors, and it cannot ever be taken lightly. Those who have fun with mathematics mock science, medicine, and the foundation of engineering. That is why on today's podcast, we're going to have absolutely no fun with mathematics. There will not be a single point at which you consider yourself charmed, there will not be a single thing you will want to tell anyone for the sake of enjoyment, and there will be no tolerance for your specific brand of foolishness, and that means you too, Kevin.

    Theme by Elliot Smith.

    Distributed under a CC BY-SA-NC 4.0 license. For more information visit CreativeCommons.org

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    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 49 min
    63: Broken Voting Systems (Voting Systems and Paradoxes)

    63: Broken Voting Systems (Voting Systems and Paradoxes)

    Voting systems are, in modern times, essential to the way that large-scale decisions are made. The concept of voicing an opinion to be, hopefully, considered fairly is as ancient and well-established as the human concept of society in general. But, as time goes on, the recent massive influx of voting systems in the last 150 years have shown us that there are as many ways to vote as there are flaws in the way that the vote is tallied. So what problems exist with voting? Are there any intrinsic weaknesses in group decision-making systems? And what can we learn by examining these systems? All of this, and more, on this episode of Breaking Math.

    Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org.


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 34 min
    62: The Atom Bomb of Information Operations (An Interview with John Fuisz of Veriphix)

    62: The Atom Bomb of Information Operations (An Interview with John Fuisz of Veriphix)

    Forecasting is a constantly evolving science, and has been applied to complex systems; everything from the weather, to determining what customers might like to buy, and even what governments might rise and fall. John Fuisz is someone who works with this science, and has experience improving the accuracy of forecasting. So how can forecasting be analyzed? What type of events are predictable? And why might Russia think a Missouri senator's race hinges upon North Korea? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math.

    The theme for this episode was written by Elliot Smith.

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch; John Fuisz]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 45 min
    RR38: The Great Stratagem Heist (Game Theory: Iterated Elimination of Dominated Strategies)

    RR38: The Great Stratagem Heist (Game Theory: Iterated Elimination of Dominated Strategies)

    This is a rerun of one of our favorite episodes while we change our studio around.

    Game theory is all about decision-making and how it is impacted by choice of strategy, and a strategy is a decision that is influenced not only by the choice of the decision-maker, but one or more similar decision makers. This episode will give an idea of the type of problem-solving that is used in game theory. So what is strict dominance? How can it help us solve some games? And why are The Obnoxious Seven wanted by the police?

    Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.or

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca; Diane Baca]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 33 min
    61: Look at this Graph! (Graph Theory)

    61: Look at this Graph! (Graph Theory)

    In mathematics, nature is a constant driving inspiration; mathematicians are part of nature, so this is natural. A huge part of nature is the idea of things like networks. These are represented by mathematical objects called 'graphs'. Graphs allow us to describe a huge variety of things, such as: the food chain, lineage, plumbing networks, electrical grids, and even friendships. So where did this concept come from? What tools can we use to analyze graphs? And how can you use graph theory to minimize highway tolls? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math.

    Episode distributed under an Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Meryl Flaherty]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 30 min
    P9: Give or Take (Back-of-the-Envelope Estimates / Fermi Problems)

    P9: Give or Take (Back-of-the-Envelope Estimates / Fermi Problems)

    How many piano tuners are there in New York City? How much cheese is there in Delaware? And how can you find out? All of this and more on this problem-episode of Breaking Math.

    This episode distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike-Noncommercial 4.0 International License. For more information, visit creativecommons.org

    Featuring theme song and outro by Elliot Smith of Albuquerque.


    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Meryl Flaherty]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 31 min

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