300 episodes

Exploring Israeli literature in English translation. Host Marcela Sulak takes you through Israel’s literary countryside, cityscapes, and psychological terrain, and the lives of the people who create it.

Israel in Translation TLV1 Studios

    • Judaism

Exploring Israeli literature in English translation. Host Marcela Sulak takes you through Israel’s literary countryside, cityscapes, and psychological terrain, and the lives of the people who create it.

    Track Changes

    Track Changes

    Kashua’s protagonist is a nameless “I” who shares considerable biographical overlaps with the author. His confessions are hardly reliable, making every level of his storytelling suspect, which Kashua further visually underscores by “track changes”-style crossed-out text.

    • 10 min
    “One, Two, Three”

    “One, Two, Three”

    Marcela reads from Anat Zecharia’s poem, “One, Two, Three.” The poem’s title and subtitle refer to Uzi Hitman’s children song about three dwarfs who sit chatting behind a mountain.

    • 10 min
    “The Children I Will Never Have”

    “The Children I Will Never Have”

    Marcela highlights poetry from the latest issue of The Ilanot Review which published English translations of up and coming poets and writers, most of whom are featured for the very first time.

    • 7 min
    Nava Semel’s “Isra Ilse”

    Nava Semel’s “Isra Ilse”

    “Isra Ilse” opens when Liam Emanuel, a descendant of Noah, inherits Grand Island. He leaves Israel to reclaim this “Promised Land” but disappears soon after arriving in the US. Simon Lenox, an investigator, tries to recover Israel’s “missing son”

    • 9 min
    Ayala Ben Lulu's “Mona Lisa”

    Ayala Ben Lulu's “Mona Lisa”

    This week Marcela returns to focus on up and coming Israeli writers who have rarely or never before been translated into English, by featuring Ayala Ben Lulu. “Mona Lisa” appears in the latest issue of The Ilanot Review, which was a collaboration with Granta Hebrew.

    • 8 min
    Ronit Matalon’s “And the Bride Closed the Door”

    Ronit Matalon’s “And the Bride Closed the Door”

    This podcast is dedicated to marriage—all the engaged couples with cold feet, newly married couples, and long-married couples who survived the wedding day. Marcela reads from and discusses the last book Ronit Matalon wrote before her death in 2017, which was awarded Israel’s prestigious Brenner Prize.

    • 10 min

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