50 episodes

Tune in to this educational monthly podcast covering various topics in Canadian Primary Care from the perspectives of two Canadian doctors in Emergency and Family Medicine, Kevin and Dimitre. The Primary Medicine Podcast is full of practical medical information that listeners can use in their daily practice – all in a convenient format that can be listened on a commute to work!



For show notes, updates, and information on how to earn Continuing Medical Education credits please visit: https://primarymedicinepodcast.com

Primary Medicine Podcast Dr. Kevin and Dr. Dimitre: Canadian Medical Educators

    • Medicine

Tune in to this educational monthly podcast covering various topics in Canadian Primary Care from the perspectives of two Canadian doctors in Emergency and Family Medicine, Kevin and Dimitre. The Primary Medicine Podcast is full of practical medical information that listeners can use in their daily practice – all in a convenient format that can be listened on a commute to work!



For show notes, updates, and information on how to earn Continuing Medical Education credits please visit: https://primarymedicinepodcast.com

    Podcast 70: Proteinuria in Children

    Podcast 70: Proteinuria in Children

    Dear Listeners,







    An estimated 10% of school-aged children will have proteinuria. About 0.1% of them will have persistent hematuria requiring further investigation.







    Transient proteinuria can be caused by stress, exercise, cold exposure, dehydration, and orthostasis.







    Persistent proteinuria can be caused by Glomerular or Tubular Disease. Glomerular disease is most common with differential including infections (Strep Throat, Mono), collagen vascular diseases (HSP, SLE), glomerulopathies and malignancies. Tubular disease is usually caused by exposure to medications such as NSAIDs, or antibiotics.







    A positive dipstick or urinalysis should always be verified with a morning sample to rule out orthostatic or transient proteinuria. If persistence is noted, this should be followed up with a Protein/Creatinine ratio to assess severity of the disease. A Renal ultrasound is helpful in ruling out structural causes such as malignancy and PCKD. Treatment is variable and diagnosis dependent. It will be usually be decided by a nephrologist or a paediatrician.







    Please visit the membership page!  







    Posted on 03/12/2020 by Dr. Dimitre

    • 17 min
    Podcast 69: C-Reactive Protein and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate

    Podcast 69: C-Reactive Protein and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate

    The C-Reactive Protein and the Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate are both lab tests used to measure inflammation in the body. They are usually elevated during infectious, inflammatory, and malignant diseases.

    • 15 min
    Podcast 68: Treatment of Male Hypogonadism

    Podcast 68: Treatment of Male Hypogonadism

    As a follow up to podcast 67, Eric Harvey, a 3rd year Mcgill medical student, is joining the Primary Medicine Podcast to go over the treatment approach for male hypogonadism.



    It is important to consider both benefits and risks of testosterone therapy, before initiating treatment. The clearest benefit is to men with abnormally low serum testosterone levels who present with sexual dysfunction. The clearest risks are erythrocytosis, cardiac, and prostate disease. It is important to do routine testosterone, lipids, hematocrit, and PSA levels.



    There are many different forms of testosterone therapy ranging from oral to intramuscular. The choice of medication is based on patient preference, cost, and side effect profile.



    We end the podcast with a brief discussion about Eric and his classmate’s experiences during the COVID shutdown. A situation without a recent historical precedent.

    • 41 min
    Episode 67: Late-onset hypogonadism

    Episode 67: Late-onset hypogonadism

    In podcast 67, Dr. Dimitre will cover the diagnostic approach to late-onset hypogonadism also known as andropause. Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), causes a gradual yearly decrease in testosterone levels of 1 to 2% in men over the age of 40. While this condition is commonly known as Andropause there is no cessation of hormone production. However, just like menopause, this change in hormone levels can lead to a significant reduction in the quality of life of patients.

    • 16 min
    Episode 66: Constipation in the Elderly with Dr. Kevin

    Episode 66: Constipation in the Elderly with Dr. Kevin

    Dear Listeners,







    Constipation, or decrease in stool frequency and hardening in stool consistency, is a common issue in the elderly and can affect their quality of life significantly.







    Dr. Kevin has a 4 step approach to constipation in the elderly. Step one is making the diagnosis, remembering that constipation is a symptom with an underlying cause. Step two is ruling out any red flags, including ones that suggest a malignancy. Step three is identifying any contributing factors, including any physical barriers for the patient to go to the bathroom. Finally, step four is to treat the whole patient.







    A word of warning for the pun averse, avoid the last 1 minute of the podcast.







    Link to Physician Empowerment







    Please visit the membership page!







    Posted on 30/03/2020 by Dr. Dimitre







    This Podcast is eligible for 0,50 Mainpro Non-Certified credits. Login to CFPC to claim them.

    • 35 min
    Episode 65: Secondary Headaches with Dr. Kevin

    Episode 65: Secondary Headaches with Dr. Kevin

    Betty Boop is having a horrid secondary headache!







    Dear Listeners,







    A headache is considered secondary when it is related to an underlying medical condition. About 10% of patients presenting with headache are suffering from a secondary cause.







    Dr. Kevin’s approach to secondary headaches is anatomical in nature. Moving from the outside in, he suggests considering environmental causes (Carbon Monoxide Poisoning), hypertensive disorders, infections of the upper respiratory tract, ocular diseases, and issues inside the skull.







    Dr. Kevin reminds us that primary headaches are a diagnosis, while secondary headaches are a symptom. Many medical conditions can cause headache, but there are usually clues in the medical history or examination to suggest secondary headache. These include visual changes, abrupt onset, onset after 50 years of age, and fever.







    Please visit the membership page!







    Posted on 19/01/2020 by Dr. Dimitre







    This Podcast is eligible for 0,50 Mainpro Non-Certified credits. Login to CFPC to claim them.

    • 28 min

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