11 episodes

Sociology studies interaction and relationships among human groups and institutions and how behavior is shaped by these relationships. It examines how society maintains stability and how it changes, investigating both consensus and conflict among social groups.The Chapman University Sociology Department and this course, aims to engage scholars, grassroots groups, students and local institutions in serious dialogue on different models of conversations and engagement practices.

Sociology Chapman University

    • Social Sciences

Sociology studies interaction and relationships among human groups and institutions and how behavior is shaped by these relationships. It examines how society maintains stability and how it changes, investigating both consensus and conflict among social groups.The Chapman University Sociology Department and this course, aims to engage scholars, grassroots groups, students and local institutions in serious dialogue on different models of conversations and engagement practices.

    • video
    Opening Remarks

    Opening Remarks

    • 9 min
    • video
    Polarized Change: An Evidence-based Theory on Subnational Immigration Regulation

    Polarized Change: An Evidence-based Theory on Subnational Immigration Regulation

    How much can a city's immigration laws actually effect a state? To what extent do states preempt local immigration initiatives? Angela Garcia, a graduate student of University of California, San Diego studies state and city regulation of immigration and asks "what the range of possibilities?" Garcia's research allows the study of state preemption of local immigration initiatives as cities become a catalyst for change in the state. States become influenced by cities' local immigration initiatives and ultimately get projected on a higher level. Garcia develops a typography that brings together demonstration effects, steam valve effects, the opposing preemption, and the state leadership/exclusivity when there is no action at the local level.

    • 14 min
    • video
    Contexualizing the Immigration Debate

    Contexualizing the Immigration Debate

    What are "illegals"? This newly coined term forms together both words: illegal immigrant and illegal alien; the word "illegals" is formed in a negative manner referring to immigrants. Angelo Paparelli, Partner of Seyfarth Shaw LLP, discusses the behavior of people reacting to the undocumented and the wrongdoings of people. Paparelli aims to explain and make sense of the backlash against the undocumented.

    • 26 min
    • video
    Criminalization of Immigrants

    Criminalization of Immigrants

    Is there actual truth in the criminality of immigrants? Just last year, over 400,000 immigrants have been deported/detained and this number constantly increases. This pertains to the criminality of immigrants, this enduring myth that is prevalent in our society today. This stereotype has been proven so categorically false over decades of research as a notion that immigrants are disproportionally likely to participate in criminal activity. In this lecture, Jesse Diaz a Professor of Sociology, University of California, Riverside, breaks this notion of immigrant criminality and stereotype through his research. Diaz examines this culture of fear, a "political piñata", that is so relevant in today's society and looks at different eras that coincide with immigration to better understand our societal ways regarding immigration.

    • 26 min
    • video
    Violence on the Border

    Violence on the Border

    "It's a no-win situation for immigrants", journalist Jose Luisa Sierra says. According to the National Human Rights Commission, nearly 10,000 migrants were kidnapped in Mexico during a six-month period in 2009. Immigrants must go through great dangers in Mexico in order to reach their 'freedom' but even when they make it to the states, they still struggle. In this lecture, Sierra discusses violence that occurs on the border and the dangers that immigrants have endured to reach new opportunities. However, crossing the border still brings forth danger as many of these immigrants are subject to a life of deprivation.

    • 15 min
    • video
    Vying for Conservative Hearts and Minds

    Vying for Conservative Hearts and Minds

    How does media really portray immigration? In this lecture, Jennifer Merolla and Chris Haynes discuss the changes in media frames on immigration since 2000. Together, they focus on primarily looking at the role of leads framing immigrants and immigration policies and also the effect of those different frames have public opinion toward both immigrants and immigration policy. In their book project, Merolla and Haynes takes a broader look at the different frames in media, the extent media discusses immigration, the Dream Act, and the way media describes undocumented immigrants.

    • 20 min

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