10 episodes

UCTV programs take a closer look at the events, people and places that shaped the American experience from the history of early exploration through modern times.

American History (Video‪)‬ UCTV

    • Society & Culture

UCTV programs take a closer look at the events, people and places that shaped the American experience from the history of early exploration through modern times.

    • video
    Triton Talks: The Kumeyaay Nation in San Diego

    Triton Talks: The Kumeyaay Nation in San Diego

    The Kumeyaay are native inhabitants of San Diego and Imperial counties and Baja California, Mexico. For thousands of years, the Kumeyaay people farmed the land and ocean, managed forest fires, manufactured pottery and basketry and engaged in commerce and trade. Stan Rodriguez, Ed.D., executive director of the Kumeyaay Community College, talks about the deep physical and spiritual connection the Kumeyaay people have to the Earth. Despite brutal religious, economic, political and social hardships under European rule, Kumeyaay culture and traditions continue in the region to this day. Series: "Triton Talks" [Humanities] [Show ID: 38071]

    • 20 min
    • video
    LSD and the War on Memories with Joel Dimsdale

    LSD and the War on Memories with Joel Dimsdale

    Beginning in the 1950s, the United States embarked on an elaborate program to study how LSD might be used to alter the behavior of an enemy. This collaboration between academia and government conducted astonishing studies with little regard for the ethics of experimentation. Joel E. Dimsdale, MD, describes how this research program evolved and shares stark examples of its impact on science and society. Series: "Osher UC San Diego Distinguished Lecture Series" [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Show ID: 37465]

    • 53 min
    • video
    The Partisan Divide - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    The Partisan Divide - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    This lecture takes on the question of why we have only two political parties in the United States and how the two party system shapes our politics. Most significantly, this lecture looks at the ways in which the politics of race - Black civil rights in particular - during the Civil War, Reconstruction, the modern Civil Rights Movement and the election of Barack Obama served to shift the two political parties into new realignments. This lecture traces the transformation of the two parties over 150 years, marking the shift of the Democrats from the party of the Confederacy to the party of the New Deal and Civil Rights, and the transformation of the Republicans from the party of Lincoln and Radical Reconstruction to the White Mans Party of Trump. Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 36281]

    • 1 hr 48 min
    • video
    How Democratic is the US Constitution? - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    How Democratic is the US Constitution? - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal.” As look at the history of American democracy, we begin with the nation’s founding contradiction: the dispossession of Natives, the enslavement of Africans and the exclusion of women in a new nation dedicated to the radical concept of universal human equality. Through a reading of the founding documents of the United States, ranging from the Declaration of Independence to the speeches of Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Barack Obama, we consider how race, colonialism and slavery shaped the nation's founding, and how this legacy, this “original sin” of the American founding, continues to shape and distort our democracy. Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 36276]

    • 1 hr 43 min
    • video
    Deep Soul: Twentieth-Century African American Freedom Struggles and the Making of the Modern World with Waldo Martin

    Deep Soul: Twentieth-Century African American Freedom Struggles and the Making of the Modern World with Waldo Martin

    Twentieth-Century African American Freedom Struggles transformed both US and World History. These seminal liberation struggles include the important yet relatively unknown series of early twentieth-century southern African American streetcar boycotts as well as the iconic Civil Rights-Black Power Insurgency (1935-75). First, Waldo Martin examines why and how these foundational freedom struggles proved essential to the making of the modern African American Freedom Movement. Second, he examines the centrality of the modern African American Freedom Movement to both the creation of the modern United States and the development of the modern world. Waldo Martin is the Alexander F. & May T. Morrison Professor of American History & Citizenship at the University of California, Berkeley. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 35148]

    • 1 hr 28 min
    • video
    Meet John Doe Discussion with Victoria Riskin

    Meet John Doe Discussion with Victoria Riskin

    America’s pre-WWII anxieties, Depression-era economic disparity, and the potential for positive social movements arise in this conversation about Frank Capra (director) and Robert Riskin’s (screenwriter) film Meet John Doe (1941) between author Victoria Riskin (Robert Riskin and Fay Wray: A Hollywood Memoir) and film scholar Charles Wolfe. Riskin and Wolfe discuss the multiple endings shot for the film, and Riskin reads passages from her father’s England-based radio broadcasts amidst the Battle of Britain. Series: "Carsey-Wolf Center" [Humanities] [Show ID: 35397]

    • 39 min

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