29 episodes

Malaria is an endemic disease in much of the world, and is a major contributor to child and infant mortality in many countries. Our malaria podcasts describe efforts by NDM clinicians and scientists, in Oxford and around the world, to treat and prevent malaria, including vaccine development, parasitology, and improved treatment for severe malaria, with the aim to lessen the disease burden on some of the world's most vulnerable people.

Malaria Oxford University

    • Courses

Malaria is an endemic disease in much of the world, and is a major contributor to child and infant mortality in many countries. Our malaria podcasts describe efforts by NDM clinicians and scientists, in Oxford and around the world, to treat and prevent malaria, including vaccine development, parasitology, and improved treatment for severe malaria, with the aim to lessen the disease burden on some of the world's most vulnerable people.

    • video
    Mathematical modelling for tropical diseases

    Mathematical modelling for tropical diseases

    Lisa White, Professor of Modelling and Epidemiology at our MORU unit in Thailand, tells us how we can use mathematical and economic modelling to better use limited resources to control or eradicate tropical diseases Mathematical modelling, particularly when combined with economical modelling, allows researchers and policy makers to determine the most effective interventions to fight infectious diseases such as malaria. We can use those models to explore ‘what ifs’ scenarios, at country or province level, save more lives and limit costs. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min
    • video
    Curing Plasmodium vivax malaria

    Curing Plasmodium vivax malaria

    Professor Ric Price, affiliated with our OUCRU unit, tells us of his research on surveillance, diagnostics and treatments for Plasmodium vivax malaria Vivax malaria used to be considered benign but is now recognised as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Resistance to chloroquine (given to treat the parasite blood stage) is growing and ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) is becoming common treatment for vivax malaria. New drugs and better public health strategies can help elimination targets, anticipated for 2030. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min
    • video
    Genomics and global health

    Genomics and global health

    Professor Olivo Miotto from our MORU programme in Bangkok, Thailand, tells us how genomics can help us improve global health Genomics is the study of the complete DNA sequence, for example of a particular parasite, allowing us to analyse its evolution and the impact of human interventions. Alongside clinical date, we use genomics to identify mutations that are markers for drug resistance. Mapping out drug resistance then helps inform elimination programmes. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min
    • video
    Tracking antimalarial resistance and treatment of malaria using Triple ACTs

    Tracking antimalarial resistance and treatment of malaria using Triple ACTs

    Dr Rob van der Pluijm from MORU (Mahidol Oxford Research Unit) in Bangkok, Thailand, tells us about his work as project coordinator in mapping resistance to antimalarials Anti-malaria drug resistance is spreading throughout Southeast Asia and we need to find new treatments. Our researchers at MORU use a combination of artemisinin and two partner drugs instead of one. If confirmed safe and tolerable, triple artemisinin combination therapies might be a good option to treat multi-drug resistant malaria, as well as slow down the emergence and spread of anti-malarial resistance. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min
    • video
    Blocking malaria transmission

    Blocking malaria transmission

    Dr Andrea Ruecker from MORU (Mahidol Oxford Research Unit) in Bangkok, Thailand, talks about possible interventions to block the transmission of falciparum malaria In the falciparum malaria parasite cycle, the gametocyte stages are responsible for the transmission from person to mosquito, then to other persons. A better understanding of how gametocytes respond to malaria treatments would help us block transmission and ultimately eliminate malaria. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 3 min
    • video
    Fighting malaria in Myanmar

    Fighting malaria in Myanmar

    Professor Frank Smithuis from our MOCRU unit in Myanmar tells us about his research on malaria Although malaria is decreasing in Myanmar, resistance to anti-malarials is on the rise in the region and the focus is now to treat people early, particularly in remote communities. MOCRU has set up a network of community health workers, trained and supplied with diagnostics, bednets and treatments, to help improve access to healthcare as well as produce the evidence to encourage policy changes. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min

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