243 episodes

Our goal is to change the way students and clinicians learn medicine. We are dedicated to providing the best medical content to help clinicians get through school, the boards, and to excel in clinical practice.

Medgeeks Clinical Review Podcast Medgeeks

    • Medicine

Our goal is to change the way students and clinicians learn medicine. We are dedicated to providing the best medical content to help clinicians get through school, the boards, and to excel in clinical practice.

    Sarcoidosis

    Sarcoidosis

    A 39yo F presents to you for cough that she has had for 7 months. It is a dry cough that she has assumed is related to her allergies. Nothing makes this cough go away. She takes no medications, other than Zyrtec daily and has no PMHx. Over the past 2-3 weeks she develops, fatigue, night sweats and even reports a fever.
    It seems this may be a bit more than simple allergies. You wisely obtain a CXR to evaluate this chronic cough with now constitutional symptoms and you believe you have your answer when you see the finding of bilateral hilar adenopathy.
    Now, how to manage it? What tests need to be ordered further? What advice do you give this patient? What are we going to do?
    On today's podcast we dive into the curious and fascinating disease known as sarcoidosis.
     
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    Do you have a question you'd like for us to answer? Submit your question here (it's free) and we'll answer on our next podcast episode: https://www.askmedgeeks.com
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    Stay up to date with our monthly audio program In the Know.
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    This podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing standard of care in a legal sense or as a basis for expert witness testimony. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast, video, or blog.

    • 14 min
    Scaphoid Fracture

    Scaphoid Fracture

    A 43 year old male presents to the emergency department with right wrist pain after falling on his outstretched right hand. You obtain an  x-ray of the wrist, which demonstrates no acute fracture or dislocation. The patient is neurovascularly intact, you decided to discharge the patient home with instructions to treat with: ice, rest, and some naproxen.
    14 months later, you're being sued by this very same patient, apparently, after you saw the patient their wrist pain never got better and in fact it persisted for over 8 months before they were finally seen again at another facility. They were then referred on to hand surgery where the diagnosis of a Scaphoid Fracture with Osteonecrosis due to non-union was made. 
    The patient is suing you because they say you missed the fracture and now they have chronic wrist pain and limited functionality of the hand, so they're unable to make a living as a plumber, and their quality of life has dropped significantly. This is a fictional story, but very very common. Today we're going to talk about how to diagnose and how to not get burned by Scaphoid Fractures.
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    Do you a question you'd like for us to answer? Submit your question here (it's free) and we'll answer on our next podcast episode: https://www.askmedgeeks.com
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    Stay up to date with our monthly audio program In the Know. Get a free trial:
    https://www.medgeek.co/in-the-know-order-form-free
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    Follow us on Instagram here:
    https://www.instagram.com/medgeeksinc
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    Check out our free resources here:
    https://medgeeks.co/start-here
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    This podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing standard of care in a legal sense or as a basis for expert witness testimony. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast, video, or blog. 

    • 16 min
    Shared Decision Making

    Shared Decision Making

    You have two patients. One is a 53 year old male with a past medical history of diabetes, and he's presenting to the emergency room with an abscess on his upper back, it has been growing larger for the past four days. His vitals are significant for a heart rate of 108 and temp of 99.9.
    Meanwhile down the hall, you're also seeing a 25 year old female who recently gave birth three weeks ago, she complains of chills, fatigue, and back pain. She has normal vital signs aside from tachycardia of 131.
    I saw both of these patients during a recent shift, and today I want to go over each case as a way to discuss a very important topic and how we as providers, communicate with, and ultimately care for our patients.
    Today we're talking about shared decision making.
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    Do you have a question you'd like for us to answer? Submit your question here (it's free) and we'll answer on our next podcast episode: https://www.askmedgeeks.com
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    Stay up to date with our monthly audio program In the Know. Get a free trial: https://www.medgeek.co/in-the-know-order-form-free
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    Follow us on Instagram here:
    https://www.instagram.com/medgeeksinc
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    Check out our free resources here:
    https://medgeeks.co/start-here
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    This podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing standard of care in a legal sense or as a basis for expert witness testimony. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast, video, or blog.
     

    • 11 min
    Cornea Pathology

    Cornea Pathology

    A 36 year old man presents to your Urgent Care complaining of progressively worsening left eye pain. It started as a scratchy feeling three days ago but now it's worse. He can barely even open it, due to the pain and the light sensitivity. When you examine the eye it's red, and there is purulent drainage. Is this pinkeye? Could it be something worse? Today let's discuss pathology relating to the cornea.
     
    Do you a have question you'd like for us to answer? Submit your question here (it's free) and we'll answer on our next podcast episode: https://www.askmedgeeks.com
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    Stay up to date with our monthly audio program In the Know: https://medgeeks.samcart.com/products/in-the-know
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    Follow us on Instagram here:
    https://www.instagram.com/medgeeksinc
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    Check out our free resources here:
    https://medgeeks.co/start-here
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    This podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing standard of care in a legal sense or as a basis for expert witness testimony. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast, video, or blog.

    • 18 min
    Atrial Fibrillation

    Atrial Fibrillation

    Private group tutoring for the boards ends soon. Learn more here: https://www.medgeek.co/private-group-training1
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    We're going to be continuing this month of December with cardiology. The first two weeks we discussed murmurs and this week we'll be discussing atrial fibrillation. 
    Believe it or not, but atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia. This is going to be characterized as an irregular rate of the atria.
    So, let's dive into presentation, EKG findings, and management. We'll also be hitting a little atrial flutter as we go.
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    Enrollment for group coaching to work with us live to help you pass the boards ends soon; learn more here: https://www.medgeek.co/private-group-training1
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    This podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing standard of care in a legal sense or as a basis for expert witness testimony. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast, video, or blog.

    • 13 min
    Stenosis and Regurgitation

    Stenosis and Regurgitation

    Free cardiology replay training: https://www.medgeek.co/cardio
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    Today, we'll be breaking down the various valvular lesions and murmurs, including mitral stenosis, mitral regurgitation, aortic stenosis, and aortic regurgitation.
    If you want to keep learning cardiology with us, then make sure to catch our free cardiology training here: https://www.medgeek.co/cardio
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    This podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing standard of care in a legal sense or as a basis for expert witness testimony. No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast, video, or blog.

    • 20 min

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