58 episodes

The Stanford Psychology Podcast invites leading psychologists to talk about what’s on their mind lately. Join Eric, Anjie, Kate, Bella, and Joseph as they chat with their guests about their latest exciting work. Every week, an episode will bring you new findings from psychological science and how they can be applied to everyday life. The opinions and views expressed in this podcast represent those of the speaker and not necessarily Stanford's. Let us hear your thoughts at stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com. Follow us on Twitter @StanfordPsyPod. Soundtrack: Corey Zhou (UCSD). Logo: Sarah Wu (Stanford)

Stanford Psychology Podcast Stanford Psychology

    • Science

The Stanford Psychology Podcast invites leading psychologists to talk about what’s on their mind lately. Join Eric, Anjie, Kate, Bella, and Joseph as they chat with their guests about their latest exciting work. Every week, an episode will bring you new findings from psychological science and how they can be applied to everyday life. The opinions and views expressed in this podcast represent those of the speaker and not necessarily Stanford's. Let us hear your thoughts at stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com. Follow us on Twitter @StanfordPsyPod. Soundtrack: Corey Zhou (UCSD). Logo: Sarah Wu (Stanford)

    58 - Susan Fiske: A Life of Studying Diversity and Stereotyping

    58 - Susan Fiske: A Life of Studying Diversity and Stereotyping

    Eric chats with Susan Fiske, Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology and Professor of Public Affairs at Princeton University. Susan is one of the world’s leading scholars studying social cognition, having written more than 400 articles and chapters as well as several books, including Envy Up, Scorn Down, and The Human Brand. She has won more awards than could possibly be listed, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and the APA Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award. Susan’s biography is currently being highlighted in the 40 Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine exhibit at the National Academy of Sciences, to which she was elected in 2013. 
    In this episode, Eric asks Susan about her latest work on how diverse environments paradoxically make us see different ethnic groups as more, not less similar. In the second half of the chat, Susan reveals why she brings exotic chocolate to lab meetings and how to find a research idea worth pursuing. She talks about her complicated journey into academia and how she developed her influential stereotype content model. She discusses the importance of female role models and the obstacles women face in academia. As if that is not exciting enough, she even gives dating advice!

    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.


    Links:
    Susan's paper on stereotype dispersion: https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.2000333117
    Susan's book on envy and scorn: https://www.russellsage.org/publications/envy-scorn-down-1
    Susan's book on marketing psychology: https://thehumanbrand.com/ 
    Eric's website
    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 50 min
    57 - Moira Dillon: Commonsense Psychology in Human Infants and Machines

    57 - Moira Dillon: Commonsense Psychology in Human Infants and Machines

    Bella chats with professor Moira (Molly) Dillon.
    Molly is an assistant professor in the department of psychology at New York University, where she directs the Lab for the Developing Mind. Molly and her lab use cognitive, developmental, and computational approaches to study infant cognition, including the early emerging knowledge about objects, people, and places; symbolic thought and reasoning in geometry and logic; pictorial and linguistic production, and the relation between human cognition and machine intelligence. 
    In this episode, we discussed Molly's new research on commonsense psychology in human infants and how this research helps advance our understanding of machine intelligence. Be ready to be amazed by what human infants are capable of understanding and doing!
    If you found this episode interesting, please consider leaving us a good rating! It only takes a second, but it will allow our podcast to reach more people and hopefully get them excited about psychology.
    Links
    Molly's paper on Commonsense Psychology in Human Infants and Machines:
    The Lab for the Developing Mind website
    Molly's Twitter @MoiraDillon
    Bella's website
    Bella's Twitter @BellaFascendini
    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Let us know what you thought of this episode or the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 42 min
    56 - Daniel Gilbert: Stumbling Into Psychology

    56 - Daniel Gilbert: Stumbling Into Psychology

    Eric chats with Dan Gilbert, Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Dan is captivated by a single fact—the world is not as it appears—and he uses science to uncover the illusions people have about the world, themselves, and each other. He is a contributor to Time, The New York Times, and NPR's All Things Considered, and in 2014 Science named him one of the world’s 50 most-followed scientists on social media. His TED talks have been seen by more than 15 million people and remain among the most popular of all time. His popular book, Stumbling on Happiness, spent 6 months on the New York Times bestseller list and sold over a million copies worldwide.

    In this episode, Eric asks Dan about his life journey from high-school dropout to one of the most respected psychologists alive. What was Dan like as a child? How did he combine his passion for science fiction writing with an academic career? Dan shares how much his life was, and is, shaped by the people around him. How did he end up in such fruitful collaborations with people like Dan Wegner or Tim Wilson? What was it like writing a popular science book, at a time when that was much less common than now? What is Dan’s advice on teaching and writing? How does he decide an idea is worth pursuing?

    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:

    Dan's book Stumbling on Happiness
    Dan's website
    Dan's Twitter @DanTGilbert

    Eric's website
    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 50 min
    55 - Jordan Starck: How University Diversity Rationales Inform Student Preferences and Outcomes

    55 - Jordan Starck: How University Diversity Rationales Inform Student Preferences and Outcomes

    Joseph chats with Dr. Jordan Starck. Jordan is an IDEAL Provostial Fellow at Stanford University. His research focuses on the reasons organizations embrace diversity, examining the psychological factors shaping people’s preferred approaches and the downstream consequences of different approaches. In this episode they chat about diversity. What reasons do entities like universities give for proclaiming to embrace diversity and inclusion? To what extent do these reasons correspond to educational outcomes? 

    Links:

    You can find the paper we discussed here

    Jordan's Twitter @JStarck4

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com


    *We are currently conducting a survey to get to know our listeners better and to collect any feedback and suggestions so we can improve our podcast. If you have 1 minute, please click the link here to submit your anonymous response: https://forms.gle/dzHqnWTptW8pSVwMA. Thank you for your time and support!

    • 47 min
    54 - Mina Cikara: Hate Crimes Against Minorities

    54 - Mina Cikara: Hate Crimes Against Minorities

    Eric chats with Mina Cikara, Associate Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, where she directs the Intergroup Neuroscience Lab. The lab uses social psychological and cognitive neuroscience approaches to study how group membership and prejudice change the course of social cognition, studying phenomena such as schadenfreude, empathy, and dehumanization. Mina’s work has been covered in outlets such as the New York Times and Time Magazine.

    In this episode, Eric chats with Mina about her latest work on hate crimes in the US. Specifically, Mina argues that as a minority group grows larger than other minority groups, it faces more negative attitudes and hate crimes. Mina chats about how these findings might contrast with the essentialism literature, where a minority group would be attributed certain fixed traits. She then shares how she sees social psychology progress as a discipline, and what she would like to see in the future. Finally, Mina gives advice for young scholars in the field and discusses how to find an idea worth pursuing.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:

    Mina's Paper: https://osf.io/2z3kw/
    Mina's Twitter @profcikara

    Eric's website
    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 37 min
    53 - Mimi Liljeholm: The Neuroscience of Agency, Learning, and How It Helps Us Understand AI

    53 - Mimi Liljeholm: The Neuroscience of Agency, Learning, and How It Helps Us Understand AI

    Bella chats with professor Mimi Liljeholm.

    Mimi is an associate professor in the department of cognitive sciences at the University of California, Irvine, where she directs the Learning and Decision Neuroscience Lab. Mimi and her lab study a broad range of topics, including agency, causal induction, habits, altruism, and social transmission. She is interested in studying how humans discover and represent the predictive structure of their environment, how such knowledge shapes cognition, perception, and motivated behavior, and how these processes go awry in addiction and psychopathology. In addition, Mimi adopts a multidisciplinary approach and draws a wide range of methods from psychology, neuroscience, economics, statistics, and computer science.

    In this episode, we discussed Mimi's research on agency, instrumental divergence, social conformity, and how these constructs apply in our daily life. We also discussed how Mimi's current research helps us further understand artificial intelligence and what researchers can do in future studies. In the end, Mimi shared a take-home message with the audience for people interested in psychology and students who wish to pursue a career as a psychologist or neuroscientist.

    You can find the paper that Mimi discussed in this episode here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cobeha.2021.04.004.

    To learn more about Mimi's research you can visit her lab at: https://faculty.sites.uci.edu/LDNLab/

    • 56 min

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