215 episodes

Strongly-held opinions. Open-minded debates. A weekly ideas show, hosted by Jane Coaston.

The Argument The New York Times

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    • 4.6 • 10 Ratings

Strongly-held opinions. Open-minded debates. A weekly ideas show, hosted by Jane Coaston.

    Should America Intervene in Haiti? ‘Go to Hell’ and Other Views

    Should America Intervene in Haiti? ‘Go to Hell’ and Other Views

    The United States has a long history of military intervention in other countries. Today, Haiti is in crisis. The country is facing gang violence, extreme hunger and intense political turmoil, sparked largely by the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse last year. And with a call from acting Prime Minister Ariel Henry, requesting international military assistance, the United States faces a familiar question: To intervene or not to intervene?

    To discuss, Jane Coaston brings together New York Times Opinion columnists Lydia Polgreen and Nick Kristof, who both have firsthand experience in Haiti. Their careers covering crises in other countries have shaped how they view U.S. intervention in the country and elsewhere around the world. “There are more problems in international relations than there are solutions, and I think Haiti, right now, is one example of that,” Kristof says.

    Mentioned in this episode:

    “‘This Is It. This Is Our Chance.’ It’s Time for Everyone to Get Out of Haiti’s Way.” by Lydia Polgreen for The New York Times
    “The Other Afghan Women” by Anand Gopal for The New Yorker

    (A full transcript of the episode will be available midday on the Times website.)

    • 29 min
    The One Thing Democrats Can Control — and How They Should Do It

    The One Thing Democrats Can Control — and How They Should Do It

    Are the Democrats, finally, in array? They’ve just had the best midterms by a sitting president’s party in about 20 years, and passed significant legislation in 2022. And now House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is stepping down after nearly two decades as leader, without the specter of intraparty battles. So what comes next for Dems, and what should the party’s future strategy be?

    Today on “The Argument,” Jane is joined by two writers with close eyes on the Democratic Party. Bhaskar Sunkara is the founding editor of Jacobin and the president of The Nation magazine. Michelle Cottle is a member of the editorial board of The New York Times. They assess the place progressivism has in the Democratic Party, what the incoming generational shift in leadership will bring and how Democrats must win.

    (A full transcript of the episode will be available midday on the Times website.)

    • 32 min
    Best of: Is the News Media Setting Trump Up for Another Win?

    Best of: Is the News Media Setting Trump Up for Another Win?

    This week, we're bringing you an episode from our archives that's more relevant than ever.

    After former President Donald Trump’s recent announcement of his 2024 White House bid — and his reinstatement on Twitter — there’s the matter of the media: What role should the press play in preserving democratic institutions?

    When we first asked this question back in December 2021, Times Opinion columnist Ross Douthat pushed back on media critics like N.Y.U. associate professor Jay Rosen, who asserted that the press should strive to be “pro-truth, pro-voting, anti-racist, and aggressively pro-democracy.” Ross disagreed, claiming that such a stance could feed more polarization. Together, Jane, Ross and Jay debate how the press should cover politics, and Donald Trump, in a democratic society.

    (A full transcript of the episode is available on the Times website.)

    • 33 min
    Has Donald Trump Lost His Grip on the Republican Party?

    Has Donald Trump Lost His Grip on the Republican Party?

    Donald Trump is running for president — again. Yet the results of last week’s midterms and the red wave that wasn’t signaled that perhaps Trump’s hold on the Republican Party isn’t so strong after all. But now that he’s back on the presidential stage, what does it mean for the future of the Republican Party? Today on “The Argument,” Jane Coaston convenes two conservative writers to provide an analysis of the party now. Ross Douthat is a columnist for Times Opinion and Kevin D. Williamson is a national correspondent for The Dispatch. Together they discuss the G.O.P.’s post-midterm vibes, how a Trump vs. DeSantis battle could play out and what the conservative movement really stands for.

    Note: This episode contains explicit language.

    Read more from this episode:

    Kevin D. Williamson’s guest essay, “Why Trump Could Win Again”
    Ross Douthat’s newsletter for New York Times Opinion and his column “Did Ron DeSantis Just Become the 2024 Republican Frontrunner?”
    Sohrab Ahmari’s guest essay, “Why the Red Wave Didn’t Materialize”

    (A full transcript of the episode will be available midday on the Times website.)

    • 25 min
    Donald Trump Was the Midterm’s Biggest Loser

    Donald Trump Was the Midterm’s Biggest Loser

    As midterm election results continue to trickle in, one thing is clear: There’s no predicting American voters. After an unexpected showing for Democrats in tight races across the country, Jane Coaston speaks with the Times editorial board member Michelle Cottle and Times Opinion columnist Ross Douthat to recap what happened at the polls. Together they discuss how the Democrats won “the expectations game,” who had the worst night (Donald Trump) and what the clouded results reveal about the bigger story of American democracy. “What we are looking at is an electorate that is feeling unsettled, and neither party made the case that they were going to provide the strength, stability, normalcy to create a wave election,” Cottle says.

    (A full transcript of the episode will be available on the Times website.)

    • 24 min
    The Price of $5 Donations: Is Small-Dollar Fund-Raising Doing More Harm Than Good?

    The Price of $5 Donations: Is Small-Dollar Fund-Raising Doing More Harm Than Good?

    As midterm frenzy reaches its peak, your inbox might be full of imploring fund-raising emails with increasingly desperate headlines: “Just $3 can make all the difference.” “Can you chip in today?” “Ultimately, it’s up to you.” In theory, the small-dollar donation model is a good thing: It enables voters to have a say in who their candidates are and counterbalances the influence of superdonors and industry lobbyists. But as extremist candidates increasingly adopt grass-roots approaches and self-fund-raise their way into Congress, could small-dollar donations be doing more harm to our democracy than good?

    Today’s guests come to the debate from different positions. Tim Miller is a former Republican strategist and current writer at large for The Bulwark who believes that there are real dangers to the grass-roots model. “Our online fund-raising system is not only enriching scam artists, clogging our inboxes and inflaming the electorate; it is also empowering our politics’ most nefarious actors,” Miller wrote recently in a guest essay for Times Opinion. On the other side is Micah Sifry, a co-founder of Civic Hall and the writer of The Connector, a newsletter about democracy, organizing and tech. Sifry thinks that, yes, small-dollar donations fund extremists, but they can also enable progressive politicians to hold powerful interests accountable as independently funded candidates. “Some politicians are going to get money for their campaigns who I disagree with, but you’ve got to live with that because the alternative is oligarchy,” Sifry says.

    Mentioned in this episode:

    “The Most Toxic Politicians Are Dragging Us to Hell With Emails and Texts,” by Tim Miller in The New York Times
    “Fed Up With Democratic Emails? You’re Not the Only One.” by Lara Putnam and Micah Sifry in The New York Times
    “Don’t Blame Our Toxic Politics on Online Fund-raising,” by Micah Sifry in Medium

    (A full transcript of the episode will be available midday on the Times website.)

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Kumar , Hyd ,

WFH

Was good 😊 loved it. The future shud be a mix , WFH/O.

Shivang15 ,

Global issues

I agree with the other dude, can we please have global issue topics

TEDDY babar ,

Argument

I love the new york times podcasts

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