37 episodes

A self learning Podcast to enable you to do what love, everyday and make a living out of it. Stories of path breakers who quit what they did not enjoy to do what they love and now make a living out it. At the break School, we don't seek hyperbolic inspiration or grandiose vision. Neither is the goal to make you the next billionaire. Here, We ask mundane questions to seek information about tools, processes, habit and communities that could enable each one of us move out professions we don't like and lead a fulfilling life by doing what we love, Everyday!

The Break School Sanjay Khandelwal

    • Careers
    • 4.9 • 11 Ratings

A self learning Podcast to enable you to do what love, everyday and make a living out of it. Stories of path breakers who quit what they did not enjoy to do what they love and now make a living out it. At the break School, we don't seek hyperbolic inspiration or grandiose vision. Neither is the goal to make you the next billionaire. Here, We ask mundane questions to seek information about tools, processes, habit and communities that could enable each one of us move out professions we don't like and lead a fulfilling life by doing what we love, Everyday!

    Taking Ownership of Your Education with Denis Murphy

    Taking Ownership of Your Education with Denis Murphy

    Author, Podcaster, Polyglot and Self Taught Coder Denis Murphy talks about Self Education, Self awareness and Benefits of having side Projects along with a full time job.  Questions from the Episode You studied Business and French. How did you Pivot towards Coding and Technology? (02:02)Why did you earlier believe that you could not be good at Technology? (05:52)Why did you learn to code yourself? (08:36)What problems do you see with University Driven Education System? (14:13)How do you find peers when you are learning something yourself? (21:12)How did teaching while you were learning help you refine your own learning? (24:20)You were coding, learning languages and writing blogs. Why did you start a podcast? (32:08)Most of us afraid of being ridiculed while creating anything new. Do you think people really care when trying something new? (33:09)What problems do you see with the self help world? (38:48)You have completed 115 episodes from your podcast without monetizing it. What keeps you going?(42:57)What kind of side projects have you tried over the years and how have they helped you? (52:21)How can having side projects along with a job help? (58:28)3 big take-Aways (01:14:13)3 Big take aways from the Episode Self Education doesn't mean doing everything yourself  or you cannot take help of peers or teachers. It just means you choose what you want to learn. It means you understand what mode of learning works best for you and design your own system. Of course, you can find peers and teachers who can best teach you and learn from them. Conclusion without Effort - We often believe we are not good at something. It could be writing, investing, communication etc. When you honestly ask why are you not good at it? You might realize you haven't really put in enough effort. May be you you tried but found it too difficult to learn. This is were self awareness comes into picture. Try to understand how do you learn? Do you learn best by reading books, by listening to someone or watching animation videos etc. Find resources and teachers that are best aligned with your learning methods. Of course. this takes time and may be  expensive but at the end of the day you will learn what you want to learn.People Don't Care -  If you are hesitant to start something because you are afraid people will laugh at you, then remember, people really don't care about what you do, as much you think they do. Everybody's got their share of problem. And if somebody does laugh, Remember we discussed what do when people laugh at you? Simple, laugh along with them 

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Seeing like a Designer with Geroge Supreeth

    Seeing like a Designer with Geroge Supreeth

    Artist, Designer and Founder of Design Consulting firm IdeaSutra, George Supreeth talks about a designer's approach to solving problems, Divergent thinking and power of observation. Questions from the Episode - Why did you choose to pursue a degree in Art and Design? (02:05)What kind of challenges did you have in finding a job? (05:05)How did you have paid assignments while you were still in college? (06:19)Have you intentional taken breaks to take a step back and reflect on your life and career? (09:42)What kind of dogmatic belief do entrepreneur nurture because of media noise? (13:40)What is design from a lay man's perspective? (17:20)Balancing Form (Visual Representation) and Function (Purpose) while designing (20:19)How does a designer approach a problem? How is it different from analytical way of solving a problem? (30:33)Is Design Thinking the new Buzz Word? What are its limitations? (38:33)How can different kinds of creators, over a period of time, develop an ability to see like designers? (41:42)What is Explorative learning? (48:27)Most parents don't want their kids be artist because they are afraid their kids may not earn enough. Your thoughts on that? (58:48)?3 Big Take Always (01:03:58)3 Big Take ways from  the EpisodeAttention to Detail -  What separates an artist from a non artist is that an artist pays close attention to the details. A stand up comedian may make you laugh for 15 minutes by talking about normal everyday experience. A writer can help you visualize a normal place in rich and vivid detail. A photographer may tell a beautiful story out of a normal everyday picture. If you want to turn what you love into an Art, pay close attention to the details. The beauty and essence lies in the boring detailsDivergent Thinking -  In schools, we were always told that there is just one correct answer to a problem and our job is to arrive that answer.  As a result, we often believe there is only one or two solution to our problems. That’s not true. It is possible to generate more solutions if you broaden your thinking . For example, let’s say you want to move to the hills but you need to sustainably earn well. Instead of thinking that you could either stay in the city and earn well or move to the hills, you can think of ways in which you can move to the hills and still earn well. May be develop a skill that helps you earn remotely or develop some passive source of income before you move to the hills. May be take a sabbatical and go live in the hills for a few months and see if you really like it. Once you have multiple solutions, you don’t have to choose just one the solution. You can figure out how can you have the best of all of them. Just Say it - Some times when you have a problem, especially problems where you need more clarity, all you need to do is explain that problem to someone else. It doesn’t have to be real person. You can explain it to a wall. The goal is get your thoughts out loudly, so that you can see the inconsistency or gaps in your understanding. This is why they say teaching is a great way to learn because when you teach something, you see the gaps in your own learning. I did not know this process had name in programming called rubber duck debugging, where programmers try to explain their code to a dummy duck in order to understand where they are going wrong. 

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Life is Meaningless! That is why it is Beautiful | Anniversary Repost

    Life is Meaningless! That is why it is Beautiful | Anniversary Repost

    On Oct 29th 2019, an IIT Hyderabad student killed himself by jumping of his hostel. He wrote to his friends that he did not find life interesting and his courses were not going great. This is the 3rd suicide at IIT Hyderabad this year.The incident made me wonder,Why do we need to score high marks, Earn more money, Seek comfort? What is really the purpose of our lives?On the first anniversary of The Break School, I reposting one of our older Episode that helped me deal with one of most the difficult question all of us grapple withNo! This snippet won’t tell you what is the purpose of your life. It will not answer that question.Rather, It will compel you to change your question!You can find the complete snippet of the episode at - www.thebreakschool.com/tbs04

    • 7 min
    Two Most Under Appreciated Teachers

    Two Most Under Appreciated Teachers

    I studied in a school, where we rarely spoke in English. English was not a language but just another subject you had to score good marks in. After school, I got into a college where my new class mates were from some of the top notch schools of Bangalore. They had incredible command over English.Their fluency both awed and intimidated me. I hesitated to speak in front of them. I stopped asking questions in my class. I was constantly afraid being ridiculed Luckily, I met two incredible teachers who taught meHow to learn even when you don’t have a teacher to give you feedback.What to do when people laugh at you.This snippet looks at these two teachers that all of us have but very few of us ever learn from. They are the two most under-appreciated teachers because they don’t give you easy answers.I Hope you will learn from them😊Find the complete transcript of the Episode at https://thebreakschool.com/under-appreciated-teachers

    • 9 min
    Lessons from Building a Social Enterprise with Team Swataleem

    Lessons from Building a Social Enterprise with Team Swataleem

    Public Education Enthusiast and Founders of Swataleem Foundation Ananya Tiwari and Vaibhav Kumar discuss about their learning from building a Social Enterprises, raising funds, building their team and myths about development sector for aspiring social entrepreneur.Questions From the Episode - Why did you guys start Swataleem? (02:40) Haven't you been told by your family to first earn money then think of social service? (09:59) How does being part of a community of problem solvers help? (13:47) Why did you directly start working in the social sector? Why not take up a good job and then work on the side on Swataleem? (16:08) How did you fund to build Swataleem? What are you major funding streams? (18:17) What kind of leanings have you had around crowd funding? (22:42) Any fundamental mistakes that you made in raising funds that aspiring social entrepreneur can learn from you to not make? (26:29) What factors do you consider while recruiting people? (31:23) How do you measure intangible factors like drive, adaptability etc while hiring?(34:36) Any learning about good hiring basis mistakes you have made? (37:36)What kind of feedback loops have you developed to evaluate the work you are doing is making a difference? (40:11)  How do you decide what kind of interventions will really help you solve the problems that you are solving? (44:44) Any myths about social Enterprise that you would want aspiring social entrepreneurs to be aware of? (49:10) 3 big Takeaways (57:21) 3 Big Takesaways from the session - Big changes take time -   As Vaibhav mentioned, the process of convincing himself and his family about pursuing a career in development sector did not take place overnight. It was a result of many conversations and smaller decisions that he made over a period of time. Understanding this is important because we often look for quick results or immediate gratification, which is not available when you are trying to make a big shift in life  Importance of Community - Most people I have had at The Break School have pursued journeys that fills them with a lot of self – doubt. This is natural, when you are doing something that is not conventional. You are bound to feel alone and have a lot of questions and reasons to quit. This is where a community of like minded people plays a crucial role. The realization that you are not alone and there are others who are also solving difficult problem, gives you the strength and hope to keep moving forward. So find your communities. And if there isn't one, build it.Own your trade offs - As Vaibhav aptly said, when you choose to go into development sector, you must be aware that it is as much a selfish decision as it is go work in a corporate for money. Or in other words , when you make a decision, own it. Do it because it gives you joy and satisfaction. Do not expect anyone to come garland you.  If you quit a well paying corporate career to work in a village because you want a lot appreciations, you will mostly likely not stay in the village for a long timeYou can find detailed show notes of the episode at - http://thebreakschool.com/Swataleem/

    • 59 min
    Lessons from a Yogi, Martial Artist and Zen Philosopher with Acharya Raghu

    Lessons from a Yogi, Martial Artist and Zen Philosopher with Acharya Raghu

    Former National Tae - Kwon - Do Champion, Hatha Yogi and founder of Sailum Martial Arts Academy Acharya Babu T. Raghu speaks about learning to absorb pain, achieving mastery and doing everything one loves, even if you cant make a living out of it.  Questions From the Episode - You have worn many hats. Armed forces, Martials Arts, Adventure sports, Writing etc. What prompted you to pursue so many things? (03:22) So how did you financially support these activities in last the 30 years? (06:14) How has cross disciplinary learning helped you apply lessons from Martial Arts & Adventure Sports to Stocks markets and vice versa (09:26) What is Martial arts and why is it called an art? isn't it a sport, a violent sport? (11:48) If Kunga Fa is a classical art form, then why do most people know only about the physical combat element of it? (15:10) What does Zen has to say about developing the mind? (17:13) What does it mean to take the journey inward? (20:07) Why do you think it is difficult for people to sit quietly for even 10 minutes? (22:14) What was your approach to learning martial arts? (25:36) What do you think are barriers to achieving mastery? (28:05) How do you transcend pain? How do you get better at absorbing pain? (29:40) How do you help students over-come the fear of pain? (37:42) Summary of Takeaways (50:02) 3 Big take away from the conversation - Absorb a little Pain Everyday - As Acharya mentioned, The gap between where you are and where you want to be is Pain of learning or effort. Learning something new or making a big decision is painful. However, you don't do it in one go. Just as in martial arts, you can inflict a little pain every day. You can learn a little everyday, you can take little risk instead of trying to do what you want to do at once.Transferable Learning - A podcast student of mine once told me "Hey, I'm a software engineer, I dont' think I can write creatively". This is an example of Indian education system where we often becomes prisoners of our past education and degrees. Acharya Raghu applied his learnings about risks in adventure sports and quick decision making from martial arts to stock market trading. This is a wonderful example of cross disciplinary learning. I'm not suggesting that learning martial arts will make you a great Stock market trader. However, the mental models or Behavior you pick up from a deep involvement in one activity often helps you navigate other discipline in unexpected ways. So you don't have to be a prisoner of your past experiences. Mastery is when you can detach your mind from the activity - I loved this definition of mastery from Acharya Raghu. You've achieved mastery in something when you enjoy it like a kid. When you can perform what you've mastered with pleasure and not pressure. You feel absolutely carefree and completely detach your mind from the activity. Mastery is when what love doing becomes a part of your muscle memory. You no longer deliberately do it. You just enjoy the flow.

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

Manaswinj ,

Consistency >motivation

Relatability x100. I really needed to hear someone say me to spend time on doing something I love instead of just motivating myself for even getting started in the first place. I have been doing that for a year now got me nowhere. Now, I promised myself to do what I love for 30days and see where it takes me. Thank you! 🤗 Way to go Sanjay!🥳

Panky0709123 ,

Seriously a motivational speech,you rocked 🤘

Great episode ‘How to be consistent’

Aarti D ,

Learn-Share-Learn and Grow!

Awesome podcast with Sumit Bansal. Very informative and got an overall view of Blogging!

My topmost learning from this podcast is that if you know something which is even 1 percent better than other person, you can share your knowledge, you can teach and that would be some value addition to other person or people. You not necessarily be an expert or master in it. You are learning along the way!

Also in this podcast, Inputs on eliminating Imposter syndrome, building credibility, online master mind groups..I found very helpful!

Great work Sanjay! Best wishes for many more of such superb podcasts!

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