100 episodes

Are you looking for financial freedom or more choices in life? You're in the right place. Each week Michael Yardney shares smart property investment strategies as well as the success and personal finance secrets of the rich, in 20 minutes or less.
While Michael is best known as a property expert, he is also Australia's leading experts in the psychology of success and wealth creation and a #1 best selling author of 8 books. He frequently challenges traditional finance advice with innovative ideas on real estate investing, personal finance and wealth creation.
His wisdom stems from his personal experience and from mentoring over 2,000 business people, investors and entrepreneurs over the last decade.
Michael's message will be priceless regardless of the size of your investment portfolio - whether you're just starting out or an experienced investor wanting to move to the next level, he will provide you a roadmap for real estate investing and financial success.
http://MichaelYardneyPodcast.com

The Michael Yardney Podcast Michael Yardney; Australia’s leading expert in wealth creation thru pr

    • Investing

Are you looking for financial freedom or more choices in life? You're in the right place. Each week Michael Yardney shares smart property investment strategies as well as the success and personal finance secrets of the rich, in 20 minutes or less.
While Michael is best known as a property expert, he is also Australia's leading experts in the psychology of success and wealth creation and a #1 best selling author of 8 books. He frequently challenges traditional finance advice with innovative ideas on real estate investing, personal finance and wealth creation.
His wisdom stems from his personal experience and from mentoring over 2,000 business people, investors and entrepreneurs over the last decade.
Michael's message will be priceless regardless of the size of your investment portfolio - whether you're just starting out or an experienced investor wanting to move to the next level, he will provide you a roadmap for real estate investing and financial success.
http://MichaelYardneyPodcast.com

    Here’s How to Avoid the Top 7 mistakes Entrepreneurs Make | Build a Business, Not a Job Podcast

    Here’s How to Avoid the Top 7 mistakes Entrepreneurs Make | Build a Business, Not a Job Podcast

    If you’re in business, and even if you’re not, today’s show about the common mistakes businesspeople and entrepreneurs make will be useful for you. 
    If you think about it, we’re all in our own little businesses: the business of property investment or the business of improving ourselves. 
    Hopefully, this discussion will help you avoid making some of these common mistakes. 
    Top 7 mistakes Entrepreneurs make
    Expecting success right away – it’s harder than most people think
    Underestimating the amount of time it will take and the cash that will be needed
    Providing a product or service that is their passion, without making sure there is a viable market for it.
    Confusing a good idea with a good opportunity
    Is there a big enough market?
    Is there a sufficient margin?
    Opportunity exists at the intersection of a deep customer need or problem and your ability to meet that need
    Not understanding the importance marketing
    If you build it, they will come is the wrong idea. You need to invest heavily in marketing – but you also need to understand it even if you outsource it
    USP– they must differentiate themselves
    Social media
    Building a list
    People problems
    Having the wrong business partner
    Hiring the wrong people
    Not firing the wrong people fast enough
    Not understanding how to manage teams
    Letting perfection get in the way of progress:
    They wait for the “right “ time. There rarely is such a time
    They wait until everything is perfect or 100% in place.  This can lead to analysis paralysis.
    Gen Colin Powell applies a 40/70 rule
    They let go too soon or don’t want to get their hands dirty.
    You have to work in your genius and focus on the highest and best use of time BUT
    You have to know how things get done in your business,
    Sometimes you have to be able to dive in and make things happen….there is a difference between delegation and abdication.
    Trying to do it alone – need a coach, mentor, mastermind group
    Links and Resources: 
    Why not join Metropole’s Business Accelerator Mastermind
    Learn more about Mark Creedon – Business Coach to some of Australia’s leading entrepreneurs  
    Show notes plus more here: Here’s How to Avoid the Top 7 mistakes Entrepreneurs Make | Build a Business, Not a Job Podcast
    Some of our favourite quotes from the show: 
    “Unfortunately, life is hard. Business is difficult. Retaining clients is difficult. Making a profit isn’t easy. Because if it was, the rewards on the other side wouldn’t be as valuable.” – Mark Creedon
    “What I’m suggesting is the list needs to be yours – not on Facebook, not on Twitter, not on LinkedIn, because over time they change the algorithms and you may lose access to those people.” – Michael Yardney
    “One of the other aspects of managing staff as your business grows is that you may well be a good practitioner at your skill, whether it’s in sales or the craft or the profession that you’re in, but that doesn’t actually translate to being good at human resources and managing people.” – Michael Yardney 
    PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW 
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    • 30 min
    Here's how Baby Boomers are Redefining Retirement- With Simon Kuestenmacher

    Here's how Baby Boomers are Redefining Retirement- With Simon Kuestenmacher

    For the last few decades, Baby Boomers have been driving our economy and our property markets. 
    But interestingly, they’re not doing what everyone thought they were going to do. 
    They’re redefining retirement. And this is going to have significant implications for our property markets and on our economy and businesses. 
    So, if you’re interested in property investment or if you’re a business owner, this is going to be an enlightening show.
     I’m speaking with Simon Kuestenmacher, a leading demographer, about how baby boomers are redefining retirement, and what that means to you and to the property market. 
    Demographics have always been a major driving factor of our economy and our property markets. And Baby Boomers have dictated many trends because there are so many more Baby Boomers than previous generations. 
    The last Baby Boomer will hit retirement age by 2029. But that doesn’t mean that they’ll all be retired. There’s been a big shift in terms of how people are defining retirement. 
    More and more people are staying in the workplace longer. Some are doing so because they find the work engaging and enjoy it. 
    We also see more and more people who are being forced to work longer. These are usually people in low-income jobs, which makes clear the crucial importance of lifelong retirement planning. 
    There are a number of different ways to plan financially for retirement. Superannuation is one way. Owning your home is another. Investing in residential real estate or shares is one more way to plan for retirement. 
    There are four major tribes of Baby Boomers moving into retirement: 
    The Lifestylists – People between 55-64 years of age who prep for retirement. They tend to slide into retirement, rather than jumping into it all at once.  The Active Retirees – People between the ages of 65-74 who are still somewhat linked to work. They want to stay active and in the family home as long as possible. They only move when they are forced to.  The Downsizers: They are 75-84 years of age. At this stage, they are slowly starting to prepare for old age. Physical problems force this group to slowly start to change their housing behavior.  Old Age: They are 85 or older. Statistically speaking, they are quite likely to have lots of physical ailments. However, they still want to live as independently and as healthily as possible.  The workforce as a whole is shifting more and more toward knowledge work. At the same time more and more repetitive knowledge tasks are being taken over by computers. That leaves humans with the tasks of socializing and networking. 
    There are also lots more jobs in the low skilled and unskilled sectors. But no new middle-skill jobs. The workforce is being hollowed out.  
    Links and Resources: 
    Michael Yardney
    Metropole Property Strategists
    Simon Kuestenmacher - Director of Research at The Demographics Group
    Join us at my annual Property Market and Economic Update – come as my guest using the Coupon Code: PODCAST  Click here for details
    Show notes plus more here: Here's how Baby Boomers are Redefining Retirement
    Some of our favourite quotes from the show: 
    “Middle ring suburbs are where we need more medium-density development, but it’s really hard to find the land or to make the economics work.” – Michael Yardney
    “As always, baby boomers are going to be an important factor in our economy and in our property markets moving forward.” – Michael Yardney
    “I really do think everyone’s doing the best they can.” – Michael Yardney
    PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW
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    • 38 min
    Property vs Shares, which is a better investment? With Pete Wargent

    Property vs Shares, which is a better investment? With Pete Wargent

    It’s the million-dollar question so many investors ask: what’s a better investment, the stock market shares or property? 
    Outside superannuation, property and shares are the two most common ways Australians build wealth. 
    Some find deciding which to invest in is a bit of a hard decision. If someone tells you only shares or only property, run away fast. That probably means they have a vested interest. 
    You’ll find that in different stages of your life, or different times when you need asset growth and cash flow, different types of investments will be more suitable for you. 
    In today’s show with our regular guest Pete Wargent, we’ll tell you the pros and cons of both asset classes.

    We’re also going to explain when they’re right for you, and when you shouldn’t be investing in a particular asset class. 
    Property or Shares?
    Property and shares are different but complementary asset classes. 
    While their long-term performances may be similar, they are very, very different as asset classes.
    The tax system in Australia tends to favour people investing in property. 
    Property
    You can leverage against property. The extra leverage you can achieve with property magnifies your returns if you’ve got a long enough time horizon  Property is an imperfect market: in property you can have an edge related to your knowledge, your information, and your contacts.  The property market isn’t controlled by investors. This gives the market more stability – housing is a fundamental human requirement. As long as you buy in the right location, the value isn’t going to disappear as it can in stocks.  The government wants us to be property investors. It actually doesn’t want to provide public housing to that 30% of Australians who rent properties. In property, you make fewer but bigger decisions, so it’s extra important to make sure those decisions are the right ones. Share market 
    The share market is much more liquid so it’s easy to get your money back on short notice.  The share market is also better for generating income (cash flow.)  Because you can buy smaller clumps of shares, the entry cost is lower. Property is lumpier. The diversification of the stock market is an advantage. You can also diversify over time.  You can leverage against shares, but not as much as you can with property.  Links and Resources: 
    Michael Yardney
    Metropole Property Strategists
    Pete Wargent  Next Level Wealth 
    Get the team at Metropole to help build your personal Strategic Property Plan Click here and have a chat with us
    Join Michael Yardney and a group of Australia’s leading experts at his annual Property and Economic Market updates – in Sydney, Brisbane, and Melbourne Use the coupon code PODCAST and come as our guest.
    Show notes plus more here: Property vs Shares, which is a better investment? With Pete Wargent
    Some of our favourite quotes from the show: 
    “Because property is lumpy, you can’t get it wrong. You’ve got to get good advice.” – Michael Yardney
    “The government wants us to be property investors. It actually doesn’t want to provide public housing to that 30% of Australians who rent properties.” – Michael Yardney
    “You are not your fears. You create your fears.” – Michael Yardney
    PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW
    Reviews are hugely important to me because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes - it's your way of passing the message forward to others and saying thank you to me. Here's how

    • 27 min
    4 property lessons from 2019 that will help you in 2020 + Your questions answered | PROPERTY INSIDERS with Dr. Andrew Wilson

    4 property lessons from 2019 that will help you in 2020 + Your questions answered | PROPERTY INSIDERS with Dr. Andrew Wilson

    As we enter a new year and the beginning of a new property cycle, there are still many mixed messages in the media leaving many investors and potential homebuyers confused. 
    Hopefully, by the end of today’s show, you’ll be a little less confused because I’m going to ask Dr. Andrew Wilson, Australia’s leading housing economist, some of the questions you’re probably thinking about. 
    But before that, we’re going to discuss some lessons that we’ve learned in 2019 that will make you a better property investor in 2020. 
    I also have a mindset moment to share about things I would have liked to know earlier.
    4 Property lessons
    As we enter a new year and in fact a new property cycle it’s interesting to look back at 2019 and see what lessons we can take out of 2019 to make 2020 a better year in property. 
    Let’s take a look at 4 property takeaways from 2019: 
    Be careful whose forecasts you listen to. What happened to all those predictions of 40% house price falls for the Australian property markets? 
    Lower interest rates, a miracle election result and looser lending criteria saw the property markets in our 2 biggest capital cities surge in the second half of 2019 
    Property investing is a game of finance - with some houses thrown in the middle.  This became clear as APRA tightened the lending screws on property investors from 2014 through till 2018 causing the biggest decline in our property markets in modern history. 
    Then when the banks’ lending criteria became more relaxed and interest rates fell in 2019 our housing markets rebounded strongly. 
    There is not one “Australian property market”.  While the fundamentals of strong population growth and the wealth of our nation will underpin the Australian property markets, there is not one “Australian property market.” 
    Each state is at its own stage of its individual property cycle and within each state there are many markets segmented by geographic location, dwelling type and price point. 
    Expect the Unexpected. Every year an unexpected X factor comes out of the blue to undo the best laid plans – some on the upside (like the miracle election result in mid-2019) and sometimes on the downside. Sometimes these are local issues and at other times they come from overseas. However, over the long term our housing markets are driven by the fundamentals so don’t make 30-year property investment or home buying decisions based on the last 30 minutes of news. 
    Bonus Lesson: The property market is not a get rich quick scheme, however those who own well located properties will benefit from the long-term growth of their properties. As Warren Buffet wisely said: “Wealth is the transfer of money from the impatient to the patient.”
    An expert answers your property questions 
    While our property markets are entering a new property cycle, currently there are lots of mixed messages in the media – some positive and many negative.
    This has led to many listeners to our podcasts leaving questions and asking for clarification.
    So, in my chat with Dr. Andrew Wilson today I’m going to ask him to answer these questions which, if you’re interested in property, are likely to be on your mind also.

    Is Australia going to fall into recession in 2020? During 2019 the RBA realised that the Australian economy wasn’t as rosy as it had hoped. 
    The labour market deteriorated, unemployment rose, incomes growth languished, inflation failed to increase, and our GDP slowed down despite 3 interest rate cuts.
    It was really only mining sector and government spending that kept our economies head above water.
    But as the year finished off, the latest labour market data at the end of the year showed a slight fall in unemployment and jobs growth albeit mainly part time jobs.
    But there are now signed of an improving global economy, particularly driven b

    • 33 min
    10 hard truths about the Wealth Gap

    10 hard truths about the Wealth Gap

    During his five years studying the rich and the poor Tom Corley identified 10 hard truths about the wealth gap that no politician or member of the mainstream media would dare reveal. 
    And as I share them with you today, you’ll probably get a few surprises.
    These aren’t just our thoughts.
    In his 5 year study, Tom asked 361 rich and poor people 144 questions each. That’s 51,984 questions.
    From the data he gathered, he was able to identify 344 differences between the way the rich and the poor conducted their lives.
    Over one hundred million individuals have read something about my research, which has been cited, quoted, referenced, commended and criticised in 25 countries around the world.
    As a result, Tom has made a lot of friends and a lot of enemies.
    And he’s about to make some more with this podcast.
    His research opened my eyes.
    One of the many benefits of having done this research is that he became privy to the inner workings of the lives of the rich and the poor.
    For five years he was that fly on the wall.
    And this fly has identified 10 hard truths about the wealth gap.
    10 Hard Truths About the Wealth Gap
    Bad Parents – The poor have parents who simply do not do their job. Drugs, alcohol, gambling and a host of other parent character flaws pull the rug out from underneath their kids.  Broken Families – The poor are raised in broken families. Divorce, incarceration, abandonment are common denominators among the poor that fracture the family unit. No Work Ethic – The poor are bad employees who have a bad work ethic. As a result, they find themselves regularly unemployed. Financial Negligence – The poor spend their money as quickly as it comes. They don’t save. They don’t invest. They are financially illiterate. Poverty Ideology – The poor believe they will be poor their entire lives. They see poverty as a fact of life. They are without hope and thus, without motivation to escape their poverty. Bad Health – The poor do not exercise regularly. They eat and drink too much junk food. They frequent fast-food restaurants. They take drugs and drink too much alcohol in order to numb their pain. They are overweight and out of shape. Uneducated – The poor do not embrace education. It’s not part of their culture. They do not self-educate themselves. They do not read. They do not engage in self-improvement. Bad Habits – The poor have many bad habits and few good habits. Entitlement Ideology – The poor believe they are entitled to things others have to work very hard for. Victim Ideology – The poor believe others hold them back in life. They see themselves as victims. They look to the government to take the wealth of those who are producing and working hard in society and redistribute it to poor people. I now know that rich people, particularly the self-made rich, are the good people.
    They were raised by good parents, parents who cared and who mentored them to succeed.
    Poor people, conversely, were raised by bad parents.
    Some were raised in broken homes, some were raised with little to no work ethic, some were raised to be ignorant of finances, some were raised with a poverty mindset, some were raised to disregard their health, some were raised to shun education, some were raised with bad habits, some were raised to believe they should be given free stuff and some were raised to believe the world was aligned against them.
    We don’t have a wealth gap in this country. 
    We have a parent gap.
    If, as a society, we truly want to end poverty, we have to first acknowledge the cause of poverty.
    Parents.
    Parents cause poverty.
    Parents are to blame.
    As a great man once said, “the truth shall set you free.”
    Links and Resources: 
    Michael Yardney
    Tom Corley - Rich Habits
    Get your own copy of our international bestseller Rich Habits Poor Habits 
    Show notes plus more: 10 hard truth

    • 38 min
    5 Property myths that aren’t true |7 Ways Australia’s property markets are different with Dr. Andrew Wilson

    5 Property myths that aren’t true |7 Ways Australia’s property markets are different with Dr. Andrew Wilson

    Our property markets have been on the move for a while now. 
    But some people are saying no, it’s all going to end, there’s still a property crash coming. 
    Others are saying that Australia’s property markets are different. 
    But are they really different? That’s what we’re going to discuss today with Dr. Andrew Wilson.
    But first, we’re going to bust another 5 property market myths so that you don’t get fooled.
    I also have a great mindset moment today. 
    At the end of this episode, you’re going to be a more informed property investor.
    Property Myths Busted
    Myth: Buying near capital cities is a certain money-spinner
    Fact: Capital cities are a good choice for investment-grade properties, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that properties there are automatically successful. 
    There will always be some suburbs that perform better than others. Some have socio-economic problems, some have better transport than others, and so on. 
    It’s a question of finding the right investment-grade locations and then the right properties in those locations.
    Myth: Property prices double every 7-10 years
    Fact: On average, that might be true. 
    The problem is that average means that half all properties double in value every 7-10 years and the other half don’t.  
    Markets move in cycles, and there are multiple property markets – depending on location, price points, and property types. There’s no guarantee that any property will double in value in 7-10 years. You have to do your due diligence.
    Myth: You can’t lose with property
    Fact: Yes, you can. 
    Not every property is an investment-grade property. Succeeding in property has to do with choosing the right property, in the right location, at the right time, and for the right price. 
    Myth: Houses are a better investment because of their land component
    Fact: Land is the component that increases in value, so it can be a good choice to own a property with a high land to asset ratio. 
    But land is not the only consideration, and not all land is the same. Desirability, demand, and location are also fundamental components of a successful property.
    Myth: It’s too late for me to invest
    Fact: Sure, it’s tougher to reap the rewards of property growth if you’re older, but it’s never too late. 
    Even late in life, there’s still the opportunity to grow your retirement funds and leave a legacy for your own children and grandchildren.
    The 7 Ways Australia’s Property Markets Are Different with Dr. Andrew Wilson 
    Population growth underpins our property markets Population growth is concentrated in our three big capital cities, creating a strong demand for housing.
    We have a sound banking system Australia’s banking system is well regulated and risk averse.
    Australia has a long-term undersupply of the right type of property The supply of new dwellings has not kept up with demand, thanks mostly to an increase in immigration.
    Debt is not a real worry Much of Australia’s debt is in the hands of borrowers who have the ability to service their loans. And much of the debt is good debt.
    Australian has a culture of homeownership This is different from overseas where many people expect to be tenants for life.
    Rental accommodation is in the hands of private investors In Australia, the majority of rental accommodation is owned by private investors.
    The government wants us to own property Because of Australia’s culture of homeownership, the government encourages first home buyers with certain incentives and property investors with tax breaks.
    Links and Resources: 
    Michael Yardney
    Metropole Property Strategists
    Metropole’s Strategic Property Plan – to help both beginning and experienced investors
    Ahmad Imam- Director of Metropole Properties Sydney
    Dr. Andrew Wilson, chief economist of MyHousingMarket.com.au 
    See the show notes

    • 40 min

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