137 episodes

CHADD's podcasts—ADHD 365 and All Things ADHD—address a variety of topics for anyone dealing with ADHD. Listen for interventions, strategies, and tips for parents, teens, adults, educators, and professionals.

Children and Adults with ADHD (CHADD‪)‬ CHADD

    • Health & Fitness

CHADD's podcasts—ADHD 365 and All Things ADHD—address a variety of topics for anyone dealing with ADHD. Listen for interventions, strategies, and tips for parents, teens, adults, educators, and professionals.

    Creencias culturales y el manejo del TDAH en familias latinas

    Creencias culturales y el manejo del TDAH en familias latinas

    Descripción:
    Los padres latinos muchas veces están navegando por aguas difíciles cuando se trata de proporcionar apoyo a sus hijos que tienen TDAH. Muchos padres tienen conexiones fuertes con su cultura y relaciones con amigos y familiares que no están familiarizados con el diagnóstico de TDAH. Las escuelas muchas veces luchan con su diferenciación entre lo que es el TDAH y un problema cultural, disciplinario, familiar o problemas de hablar y el lenguaje. Aumentar la comprensión y el empoderamiento de los padres es un primer paso fundamental para ayudar a los jóvenes latinos con TDAH a prosperar en el hogar y la escuela.

    Objetivos:
    1. Identificar las suposiciones y entendimientos comunes que tienen los padres latinos sobre el TDAH.
    2. Describir las formas en que las escuelas malinterpretan los síntomas del TDAH en los jóvenes latinos.
    3. Nombrar formas clave en las que los padres y las escuelas pueden trabajar juntos para promover la comprensión, la empatía y la colaboración.
     
     

    • 20 min
    Women in Midlife and ADHD

    Women in Midlife and ADHD

    Many women struggle at midlife with undiagnosed and untreated ADHD complicated by hormonal changes. They typically report feeling overwhelmed, inadequate, misunderstood, and distressed at a time in their lives when they often have the greatest demands on their time and energy. Women not diagnosed with ADHD until adulthood are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep disorders, eating disorders, substance use, and low self-esteem.


     


    In this episode, Dr. Carol Robbins provides an understanding of the challenges women face in midlife with ADHD, coping strategies, and the importance of reaching out when help is needed.


     


    Read more about women in midlife and ADHD.


     


    Carol Ann Robbins, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD across the lifespan. She is the clinical director of the Annapolis ADHD Center and works with Kathleen Nadeau, PhD, an internationally known expert on ADHD, at the Chesapeake ADHD Center of Maryland. Dr. Robbins is a seasoned speaker, presenter, and author, as well as past president of the Maryland Psychological Association and coordinator of the MPA Post-Doctoral Institute on ADHD Across the Lifespan. She has served as coordinator of the Anne Arundel County chapter of CHADD since 2002.


     

    • 11 min
    ADHD and the Struggle with Suicidal Ideation

    ADHD and the Struggle with Suicidal Ideation

    ADHD impairments are made worse for many individuals by their struggles with excessive anxiety, persistent depression, compulsive behaviors, difficulties with mood regulation, or other coexisting disorders that persistently disrupt their daily lives. Sometimes this could lead a person struggling with their ADHD down a dark road to contemplating suicide.


    Talking about suicide, suicidal ideation, and self-harm with a loved one you suspect has these feelings can be challenging. Dr. Roberto Olivardia talks with Susan Buningh about the risk factors in children and adults who have ADHD, warning signs, and preventive measures to help someone you think may be considering self-harm or suicide.


     


    Dr. Roberto Olivardia is a clinical psychologist and lecturer in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He maintains a private psychotherapy practice in Lexington, Massachusetts, where he specializes in the treatment of ADHD, executive functioning issues, and students with learning differences. He also specializes in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and eating disorders in boys and men. He currently serves on the professional advisory boards for CHADD, ADDA, and the National Association for Males with Eating Disorders.

    • 23 min
    Latino Culture and ADHD Treatment

    Latino Culture and ADHD Treatment

    ADHD is found in all communities. For Latinos, cultural norms and barriers to healthcare affect the perception of ADHD symptoms in children, which may go unnoticed or undiagnosed. What are some of the cultural barriers to ADHD treatment? How can cultural beliefs affect treatment for ADHD? Dr. Lauren Haack will discuss common symptoms of ADHD and its presence in the Latino population. In addition, she gives insight into important cultural considerations professionals need to be aware of when treating Latinos with ADHD. She will also discuss how gender roles and family values may influence decisions about treatment options.


     


    Lauren Haack, PhD, is an assistant professor and attending psychologist in the department of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Her research program and clinical practice focus on accessible and culturally attuned evidence-based services for vulnerable youth and families, with a particular specialty in ADHD services for children in Spanish-speaking, Latinx families.


     

    • 17 min
    Adult ADHD and Suicide Prevention

    Adult ADHD and Suicide Prevention

    The death of someone you love is often met with sadness. But the heartache felt by family members and friends can become more confusing and unnerving when the cause of death is suicide. Researchers say adults with ADHD have a high prevalence of attempted suicide. But is there a direct link between ADHD and suicide? What other risk factors are involved? Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman shares insight and understanding of risk factors and other conditions that often coexist with ADHD, increasing suicidal thoughts and attempts. She also discusses warning signals, preventive measures, and the approach to take if faced with someone expressing suicidal ideation.


     


    Jill Harkavy-Friedman, PhD, is vice president of research at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She works with over 200 scientific advisors to evaluate progress in the field and chart the next areas of inquiry to yield impactful insights and strategies for suicide prevention. Dr. Harkavy-Friedman has published over 100 articles. She works closely with AFSP’s education, communication, and public policy and advocacy teams to develop programs and messages to ensure they follow best practices in suicide prevention and reflect the latest findings in research. She earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and her master’s degree and doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Florida. In 1984, she joined Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine as an assistant professor. She established the Adolescent Depression and Suicide Program. In 1989, Dr. Harkavy-Friedman moved to Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, first as an assistant professor and later as an associate professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains a clinical practice in Manhattan.

    • 22 min
    Teens, ADHD, and Suicide

    Teens, ADHD, and Suicide

    Children and teenagers are more exposed than ever due to social media. They share what they are doing in real-time. As a result, experts say kids are growing up with more anxiety and less self-esteem. For parents, knowing what their child or teen is thinking and feeling becomes even more challenging. So, when do the usual ups and downs of a child with ADHD become something to worry over?  What if your teen is thinking about suicide? Do you know the warning signs? In this episode, Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman talks about the warning signs for parents to watch for in their children. Also, she provides strategies for talking to your child and teen about suicide, building a support network, and preventive measures.


     


    Jill Harkavy-Friedman, PhD, is vice president of research at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She works with over 200 scientific advisors to evaluate progress in the field and chart the next areas of inquiry to yield impactful insights and strategies for suicide prevention. Dr. Harkavy-Friedman has published over 100 articles. She works closely with AFSP’s education, communication, and public policy and advocacy teams to develop programs and messages to ensure they follow best practices in suicide prevention and reflect the latest findings in research. She earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and her master’s degree and doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Florida. In 1984, she joined Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine as an assistant professor. She established the Adolescent Depression and Suicide Program. In 1989, Dr. Harkavy-Friedman moved to Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, first as an assistant professor and later as an associate professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains a clinical practice in Manhattan.

    • 20 min

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