106 episodes

Elixir Outlaws is an informal discussion about interesting things happening in Elixir. Our goal is to capture the spirit of a conference hallway discussion in a podcast.

Elixir Outlaws Elixir Outlaws

    • Technology

Elixir Outlaws is an informal discussion about interesting things happening in Elixir. Our goal is to capture the spirit of a conference hallway discussion in a podcast.

    Episode 107: Nineteen-Something Cats

    Episode 107: Nineteen-Something Cats

    The Elixir Outlaws now have a Patreon. If you’re enjoying the show then please consider throwing a few bucks our way to help us pay for the costs for the show.


    Elixir Outlaws, 01/19/2021


    On today’s episode of the Elixir Outlaws, Sean Cribbs and Amos will talk about WASM (Web assembly) to implement some core parts of the app and discuss the server-side too. Rusts for loop syntax is sugar for iterators, says Sean. So, you can also sort of do method chaining type thing in rust. There is an interesting proposal on the Elixir form for loops.


    Episode Highlights
    FOR loops are not loops, they are a special form in the compiler, basically a macro with special privileges that generates some code, says Sean.
    As per Sean, if you have a lead, then you have for loop variable, and you have to return a two-two pole that has the accumulator as the second, or if you don’t, then it is just the accumulator that becomes quite confusing.
    Amos says that when one uses MapReduce and has FOR loop and you want to step through something and maybe at the same time get an account and a sum, and you want to adjust the current values, then we are getting three things out in adjustment and then two other data points.
    It is hard to step away from an imperative mindset when you have done it forever and adding imperative things back into the language is going to make it even harder for people to step outside of that imperative mindset, says Amos.
    People use Monads to write things that look more imperative because it is easier for us to think that way sometimes, and it’s going to create less maintainable code.
    OCaml is very much like in the same syntactical flavor as Haskell. But it doesn’t have that whole lazy evaluation thing that gets so confusing at times, and it also has the much simpler type of system.
    Sean had tried hard to encourage his coworkers to use things like in the lists module or use list comprehensions or use fold wherever they could. But some people liked making software recursive functions that had a bunch of arguments to them.
    In MapReduce there is a trailing option you can put on for loops. It is like reducing given initial value of the accumulator and then you match the accumulator coming in.
    Using ENUM reduce, there are some tactical forms that represent something, and special form will generate, but they are not things in themselves.
    The things that are browser based we can’t rewrite completely in Rust. There is always going to be JavaScript at some level.
    Sean has seen attempts where people want to have JavaScript running the same code on the front end as in the back end.
    In graphic production, there are many things about memory allocators, but these are all sorts of things that we might have to think about with rust when we are trying to implement.


    3 Key Points
    With MapReduce in the ENUM module, you can do something on each element of the collection, but you are also collecting something about the entire collection as you flow through, says Sean.
    The flipside of list comprehension is that you can only do so many things in the right side of the comprehension. It may be explicit what you were returning from expression because the entire expression is inside the list brackets.
    The biggest thing that Amos have ever had to deal with when working on stuff on the front end or on edge computing is if you don’t control the resource at the endpoint, it may be the slowest thing ever, and it may not work that well.


    Tweetable Quotes
    “I am not against pipes, and you can write non-imperative code with pipes, but it looks imperative.” – Amos
    “In FOR loop, FOR is an expression that returns a value. You can choose to ignore that value that’s returned, but it returns a value, usually a list.” – Sean
    “You can have only one let, which is the other thing that’s a little bit surprising. It works in if statements.” – Sean
    “Being able to have code on the back end, you control the hardware and the performance

    • 41 min
    Episode 106: Outlaws Live at Codebeam 2021

    Episode 106: Outlaws Live at Codebeam 2021

    The Elixir Outlaws now have a Patreon. If you’re enjoying the show then please consider throwing a few bucks our way to help us pay for the costs for the show.
    Support Elixir Outlaws

    • 44 min
    Episode 105: Sports of Sorts

    Episode 105: Sports of Sorts

    The Elixir Outlaws now have a Patreon. If you’re enjoying the show then please consider throwing a few bucks our way to help us pay for the costs for the show.


    On today’s episode of the Elixir Outlaws, Sean Cribbs and Amos King are going to talk about Sports of Sorts. Amos shares some driving wisdom and his fondness for silent thoughts. Sean and Amos will share some random and interesting experiences.


    Episode Highlights:
    Amos reveals how he developed his creativity and problem-solving skills from driving.
    Sean has recently resigned from his job, and he is about to join a new company after 12 days.
    As per Sean, one spends a lot of your time sleeping because their dreams help them to work through problems
    Amos loves jogging around the river next to the hotel early in the morning when nobody is up. For him, it is nice and quiet.
    Brittany Matthews is a co-owner of the women's soccer team. She has been big in promoting women’s sports in Kansas City, but especially soccer, and Patrick and Brittany broke ground on a new training center earlier this year. Then, three or four weeks ago, they revealed their new team name.
    The stadium is first of its kind for the women’s soccer team, which is huge because this team has only been here a year. They just announced that they were going to have a team this January 2021.
    For those not in Kansas City, the streetcar is absolutely free , which is really awesome with all the buses because buses are free too. So you can go anywhere for free in Kansas City.
    We have one of the best women soccer players in Samuels who has been on the national team. An Incredible midfielder, dynamic player, and she is going be exciting to watch, says Sean.
    While talking about the new company where Sean is going to join. He explains that the company is doing motion graphics or motion design.
    People really want the ability to collaborate to provide feedback on designs, work on different iterations, compare them, and build out a portfolio for you, says Sean.
    There are multiple companies out there called Fable, so if you want to go look it up, it is Fable, not Fable dot IO, not fable com. It is the Fable Dot app. It is one of those easy, easy ones to find.
    Amos says he doesn’t know how possible it would be, but it would be interesting if, two designers could work on the same like image or animation at the same time, doing the same kind of ideas of passing changes back and forth.
    Part of the reason why Sean’s friend wanted to hire him is because he has distributed systems experience, where all the bodies are buried, where all the problems are gonna be like what if we want to have real time collaboration or like something like Miro where people are dragging things around on the on the project at the same time.
    What always kills me on the front end in the browser, or even if you are compiling and making things faster, is that you really have zero control over the quality of the computer it is running on and the problems like the interactions between the things, says Amos.
    Sean says that they are going to write C+ code because it was mostly C code, but using the C ++compiler and very few features of C and like the Windows API and like working with it directly to build a 2D kind of Zelda light game.
    Sean says that the JavaScript community is huge. You have a lot of people experience in JavaScript. It doesn’t take that many of them to make a good customization.
    Amos shares that his first editor for code other than the QBasic editor was Emacs and that was 22 years ago.
    Amos says that his first experience with C not running everywhere was in an AI class and they had to write a chess engine and then they all played the developed chess engines against each other.
    Sean says there is a bytecode format that you can take from running on a Intel being VM and run it on an ARM beam VM or on some other processor that is running your nerves project.


    3 Key Points
    Those of you who don’t know anything about

    • 38 min
    Episode 104: Hot Pockets and Refresh Buttons

    Episode 104: Hot Pockets and Refresh Buttons

    The Elixir Outlaws now have a Patreon. If you’re enjoying the show then please consider throwing a few bucks our way to help us pay for the costs for the show.


    On today’s episode of the Elixir Outlaws, Sean Cribbs and Amos King are going to talk about
    the Elixir Conference. Amos talks about his ordeal to reach the Elixir Conference, his flight
    continuously got canceled, and the entire journey was hectic for him. From the scariest
    landing to nonstop flights getting canceled, rescheduled, and re-routed, Sean’s travel ordeal
    covers all.


    Episode Highlights:
     Amos gives detailed insights about his talk and pre-preparation. He has a habit of
    continuously improving his speech and slides, and this is precisely what he did when
    he got the extra time due to flight cancellations and re-routing.
     Amos received a lot of positive feedback, and he had a wonderful experience at the
    conference. For him, it was nice to be around people again post-pandemic.
     Amos suggests before giving a speech, and you don’t have to write out the entire
    talk, write notes for things that you need to say in a specific way.
     Sean talks about a funny incident that happened in QCON 2014, and he explains
    why he has a meme and a Russian Fake Facebook account.
     While giving a talk at the vendor track at QCON, which is a big industry very
    expensive enterprise technology conference type thing, Sean made a funny posture
    with his hands.
     At the QCON, the photographers have a talent for catching speakers with their hands
    and really interesting and kind of disturbing positions. Sean tried hard not to make
    any postures, but the photographer still got a funny picture that later got circulated as
    a meme.
     Amos explains how nerves are set up; you can use nerves to deploy to your servers
    if you want to. Because you just have to have something that can run Linux. So now
    you have B partitions that automatically swap over if one fails. So you can use the
    nerves hub to deploy to your servers. You just have to build a nerves image for
    whatever server you have.
     Sean and Amos explain how you can accomplish really great things when your tools
    are well built.
     Amos says there have been a lot of things that the nerves team and working on
    nerves has brought back to the ecosystem as a whole.
     Sean feels that there is a lot of good stuff going right now, but there is also a long
    way to go before you can really feel like, hey, this out of the box or very close to out
    of the box new Elixir project, it is going to have metrics tracing, logging, built in. So,
    Sean feels that he just has to add his own flavor for this particular project and make
    that part of his engineering process.
     Sean talks about a crypto finance company and one of its major functions, i.e.,
    trading.
     Sean explains how there are multiple systems within an infrastructure that interacts
    as part of the process.
     As soon as you know your product is viable, you get feedback to give users better
    experiences, says Amos.
     Sean explains how one can directly correlate to the cost of the server, and one can
    save memory.
     Talking about his side projects, Sean said his project capacity planner became one
    of his major projects.
     Sometimes you just have to turn people away in order to serve anyone, says Sean.


     There are a bunch of products without the sort of visibility to their customers even
    those products do not have value or not apparent value like the content distribution
    networks (CDN).
     While talking about passing the acceptance test, Sean says to Amos that you can
    build these kinds of things that look like single-page apps, but they are completely
    server-side driven, and you can manage this state and Elixir, and that is great.


    3 Key Points



    Amos says that at the conference, they mainly talked about whenever you are doing
    acceptance tests driver browser or really any system that you have to wait for things
    like transitions so that as a user, you might not thin

    • 51 min
    Episode 103: Welcome back Anna

    Episode 103: Welcome back Anna

    Anna, Sean, and Amos talk about what they do to take a break, and follow it up with how to get started on hard problems when there is no clear path forward.


    The Elixir Outlaws now have a Patreon. If you’re enjoying the show then please consider throwing a few bucks our way to help us pay for the costs for the show.
    Support Elixir Outlaws

    • 54 min
    Episode 102: Who's that host? It's Sean.

    Episode 102: Who's that host? It's Sean.

    How do we get started?


    How does context affect the software we write?


    The Elixir Outlaws now have a Patreon. If you’re enjoying the show then please consider throwing a few bucks our way to help us pay for the costs for the show.
    Support Elixir Outlaws

    • 34 min

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