16 min

009 - Shared parental leave April 2015 Engage - The Human Resource Podcast Show

    • Economia

In episode 9 of Engage, Alistair Booth discusses the Shared Parental Leave regulations that came into effect on 5 April 2015.

This is a new system of shared parental leave which replaces additional paternity leave, for parents of babies due from 5th April.

Shared parental leave overlaps with a mother’s right to take maternity leave and exists alongside her partner’s right to take one or two weeks’ paternity leave. It replaces the right to additional paternity leave. However, not everyone qualifies for shared parental leave; both parents need to have at least 26 weeks’ service with their current employer and earn at least the minimum threshold needed to qualify for maternity allowance.

KEY POINTS TO NOTE:

Each parent must give eight weeks’ notice of his or her intention to take shared parental leave (in the mother’s case, this will be in addition to the notice that she must give in relation to her maternity leave).

The employer is also entitled to see a copy of the child’s birth certificate and to be given the other parent’s national insurance number and the name and address of his or her employer.

SHARED PARENTAL LEAVE KEY FACTS

After 2 or 4 weeks’ compulsory maternity leave following the baby’s birth, a mother can opt to take the remaining leave as “shared parental leave” – which can then be shared with the baby’s father
Both parents can take leave at the same time
Leave can be taken in several separate “blocks”
All leave must be used by the baby’s first birthday

You can reach out to Alistair on twitter @TheHrBooth, by email info@thehrbooth.co.uk or via www.thehrbooth.co.uk

Disclaimer: You must not rely on the information in this podcast as an alternative to Human Resource Management advice from an appropriately qualified professional. If you have any specific questions about any Human Resource Management matter you should consult an appropriately qualified professional.

You should never delay seeking Human Resource Management advice, disregard Human Resource Management advice, or commence or discontinue any Human Resource Management action because of information in this podcast.

Please contact The HR Booth directly for specific advice and guidance.

In episode 9 of Engage, Alistair Booth discusses the Shared Parental Leave regulations that came into effect on 5 April 2015.

This is a new system of shared parental leave which replaces additional paternity leave, for parents of babies due from 5th April.

Shared parental leave overlaps with a mother’s right to take maternity leave and exists alongside her partner’s right to take one or two weeks’ paternity leave. It replaces the right to additional paternity leave. However, not everyone qualifies for shared parental leave; both parents need to have at least 26 weeks’ service with their current employer and earn at least the minimum threshold needed to qualify for maternity allowance.

KEY POINTS TO NOTE:

Each parent must give eight weeks’ notice of his or her intention to take shared parental leave (in the mother’s case, this will be in addition to the notice that she must give in relation to her maternity leave).

The employer is also entitled to see a copy of the child’s birth certificate and to be given the other parent’s national insurance number and the name and address of his or her employer.

SHARED PARENTAL LEAVE KEY FACTS

After 2 or 4 weeks’ compulsory maternity leave following the baby’s birth, a mother can opt to take the remaining leave as “shared parental leave” – which can then be shared with the baby’s father
Both parents can take leave at the same time
Leave can be taken in several separate “blocks”
All leave must be used by the baby’s first birthday

You can reach out to Alistair on twitter @TheHrBooth, by email info@thehrbooth.co.uk or via www.thehrbooth.co.uk

Disclaimer: You must not rely on the information in this podcast as an alternative to Human Resource Management advice from an appropriately qualified professional. If you have any specific questions about any Human Resource Management matter you should consult an appropriately qualified professional.

You should never delay seeking Human Resource Management advice, disregard Human Resource Management advice, or commence or discontinue any Human Resource Management action because of information in this podcast.

Please contact The HR Booth directly for specific advice and guidance.

16 min

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