261 episodi

The weekly podcast for and about firefighters, "Code 3" covers topics of interest to those in the fire service, through interviews with those who know it best. From Chiefs to Probies, Engineers to Firefighters, and Paramedics to EMTs, award-winning journalist Scott Orr talks with them all.

Code 3 - The Firefighters' Podcast Scott Orr

    • Carriere

The weekly podcast for and about firefighters, "Code 3" covers topics of interest to those in the fire service, through interviews with those who know it best. From Chiefs to Probies, Engineers to Firefighters, and Paramedics to EMTs, award-winning journalist Scott Orr talks with them all.

    Train 'em and get out of their way with Kaci Corrigan

    Train 'em and get out of their way with Kaci Corrigan

    Sometimes, we make things more difficult than we need to. We develop a course of training, then insist on dictating every move firefighters make once they master it. The bottom line, usually, boils down to: put the wet stuff on the red stuff and the fire goes out. More wet stuff applied faster puts the fire out faster. This is taught on, or about Day One in Firefighter-1 classes. It’s certainly not all they’ll learn, but the rest builds on that foundation. And, with experience, they will use their own judgment, which we assumed was sound when they graduated, to guide them. So why do so many officers micromanage their crews? After all, wasn’t the point of training them so they could do the job? I’ve always hated being treated that way, and, conversely, I have loved to be able to point the guy at the job and count on him to get it done. My guest today, Kaci Corrigan, advocates for that same attitude. She’s a lieutenant at a department in Northwest Pierce County, Washington. She’s been on the job for 13 years. She deals heavily with training, including instruction in fire behavior, strategy and tactics, nozzles, hose streams, and tactical ventilation. She is an instructor with First Due Training in Washington State, as well as an adjunct instructor with Fire By Trade.

    • 18 min
    Firefighter PTSD: A Spouse's Perspective with Lori Moore

    Firefighter PTSD: A Spouse's Perspective with Lori Moore

    Last week, we talked with Chris Moore, a captain with the Chesapeake, Virginia Fire Department about his battle with PTSD. This week, I’m bringing you the other half of the equation. That’s his wife, Lori. If you’re a firefighter and you believe you have PTSD, please play this show for your significant other. Because, try as they will, no one fights PTSD alone. It affects all their relationships, especially the one between the firefighter and their spouse. Lori has been married to Chris for 16 years and they have a son, who is now 14. She saw the factors leading to Chris’ trauma begin to mount. And she has some insights as to what a spouse must endure while dealing with their partner’s PTSD.

    • 18 min
    To PTSD Hell and Back with Chris Moore

    To PTSD Hell and Back with Chris Moore

    Twenty years ago, it was a big no-no for a firefighter to admit to having anything like Post-Traumatic Stress. Of course, it’s still stigmatized in many firehouses. That’s a problem. PTSD can affect anyone, even the toughest firefighter. It doesn’t take being part of a line-of-duty-death or even a near-miss to cause it. And it can turn a dream career into a long-term nightmare. Suicides, driven by trauma, now take more firefighter lives than line-of-duty-deaths. But there are solutions. If you have PTSD and you’ll ask for help, it can be dealt with. With me today is Captain Chris Moore of the Chesapeake, Virginia Fire Department. He’s been a firefighter for 27 years. Chris has experienced the darkness of PTSD and recovered from it. Now he works to help others through his department’s Peer Support and Behavioral Health Team.

    • 19 min
    This Volunteer Department’s Got It Figured Out with Ed Dolan and Shawn Heppner

    This Volunteer Department’s Got It Figured Out with Ed Dolan and Shawn Heppner

    How would you define success in a volunteer department? Would it be recruiting and retention? Or how about solid leadership? Maybe response time? Today, we’re going to talk about a department that meets all of those criteria. It’s called Ulster Hose Company 5, and it’s found in New York’s Hudson Valley near the city of Kingston. Ninety members respond from their homes. And they cover 1,500 calls a year with an average time to response of 3 minutes. If you’re struggling just to get members to show up for runs, you’ll want to pay attention. Back again on Code 3 to explain how they do it is Ed Dolan. He’s been studying Ulster Hose 5 and has some interesting insights. Ed’s a member of the Catskill Fire Department in New York for 30 years, and he’s served more than half that time as a chief officer. Shabw Heppner is Chief of Ulster Hose Company 5.

    • 24 min
    How to stop the job from taking over your life with Dr. Donnie Hutchinson

    How to stop the job from taking over your life with Dr. Donnie Hutchinson

    What are your priorities in life? Most firefighters will typically answer this question by saying, “My family, my health, and my job.” But the reality is, most firefighters I’ve known, and I’ll bet most you know, are more likely to put their job first, their family second, and their own health a distant third. For example, a study found that about 80% of career firefighters are obese. And it’s pretty well-known that firefighters are frequently workaholics, taking extra shifts and working second and even third jobs. You do it for your family, of course. But that takes your time away from them, too. There’s an obvious disconnect between what firefighters say they value and what they do. My guest today says that all adds up over time and causes a lot of avoidable problems. Dr. Donnie Hutchinson says it’s time to find a work-life balance. It’s doable, and he’s here to explain how. Donnie is a work-life balance speaker who has held many firefighter health and wellness seminars. He’s spoken at IAFF conferences. He is a professor at the University of Dayton teaching leadership courses in the MBA school. He’s written two books on work-life balance.

    • 18 min
    Using the radio the right way with Mark Szczepanik

    Using the radio the right way with Mark Szczepanik

    One of the critical skills a firefighter needs is the ability to communicate concisely and completely over the radio. Some firefighters, especially new officers, get excited on the radio and are loud, but don’t have much to say. Then the IC has to ask for clarification, which wastes time and ties up the radio. It definitely pays to take a second and be sure of what you’re going to say. The key is a balance between too much info—oh, yeah, that happens more than you’d like to admit—and too little. Here to explain how to find that balance is Mark Szczepanik. He’s a past Chief at the Lake View, New York Fire District and a dispatcher for the town of Hamburg, New York with over 30 years of experience.

    • 13 min

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