15 episodi

Econ Minute covers real world economics that can affect you, your family, and your work. The podcast is more than a minute and covers much more than just economics. For more, visit EconMinute.com.

Econ Minute Podcast Eric Fruits, Ph.D.

    • Economia

Econ Minute covers real world economics that can affect you, your family, and your work. The podcast is more than a minute and covers much more than just economics. For more, visit EconMinute.com.

    How does a family business survive three generations? An interview with the CEO of Beaverton Foods

    How does a family business survive three generations? An interview with the CEO of Beaverton Foods

    For this episode of the EconMinute podcast, we again co-host with Jim Pasero, publisher of the Oregon Transformation Newsletter. We are joined by Dominic Biggi, CEO of Beaverton Foods. The maker of dozens of flavored mustards, horseradishes and other condiments employs about 80 workers and is selling its products around the world. The company was founded by Dominic’s grandmother, an Italian immigrant who began bottling and selling horseradish as a way to make a living during the Great Depression. Most family businesses don’t survive the second generation. Let’s here how the Biggi’s have kept their business alive and independent for 88 years.

    • 54 min
    Wildfires and regulation: How the Portland Spirit business deals with disaster

    Wildfires and regulation: How the Portland Spirit business deals with disaster

    For this episode of Econ Minute, we are doing an experiment. In collaboration with the Oregon Transformation Project, we have Jim Pasero - author of the Oregon Transformation Newsletter - co-hosting while we interview Dan Yates, President of The Portland Spirit. Portland Spirit provides river cruises on the Willamette and Columbia Rivers and owns a restaurant on the Columbia at Cascade Locks. Dan discusses the challenges of running a smallish business and how Oregon’s summer wildfires took a huge toll on his and other Northwest businesses. We also talk about some of the regulatory challenges of running a business in Portland.
    If you want to receive the Oregon Transformation Newsletter, just follow the link.

    • 1h 14 min
    Reforming health care: A lesson from Apollo 13

    Reforming health care: A lesson from Apollo 13

    “Houston, we have a problem.” It’s the most famous line from Apollo 13 and perhaps how most Republicans are feeling about their plans to repeal and replace Obamacare. As repeal and replace has given way to tinker and punt, Congress should take a lesson from one of the other memorable scenes in Apollo 13. 
    Here’s how you can hear more:
    Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
    The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.
    Originally posted on Truth on the Market.

    • 14 min
    Taxes, more taxes, and ... "recreational" marijuana

    Taxes, more taxes, and ... "recreational" marijuana

    With the ink barely dry on Oregon's costly Low Carbon Fuel Standard law, Portland city commissioner Steve Novick bets than a 10-cents-a-gallon gas tax will be his ticket to re-election. Along the way, Ann asks the question: What if we can say how our tax dollars are spent? 
    We wrap with the one "sin" that's not subject to a "sin tax." That's right, "recreational" marijuana in Oregon is not taxed. Who will be the first politician to come out of the ganja closet? 
    Here’s how you can hear more:
    Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
    The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

    For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

    For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

    • 22 min
    Unspoiled by progress

    Unspoiled by progress

    With legalization of recreational marijuana sales in Oregon just a day away, Portland City Hall is still working out how it plans to regulate the new business. What have they been doing for the past year? 
    This is nothing new, however. The most progressive city in the U.S. often seems stymied by progress. New businesses and technologies seem to take city council by surprise. More than one commissioner is still stuck in the pre-smartphone era. 
    How can city government regulation entire industries, when the decision makers are simultaneously surprised, scared, and befuddled by technological progress? Tuesday Memo and Econ Minute try to answer these questions and more. Here's how you can hear more:
    Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
    The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

    For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

    For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

    • 25 min
    Déjà vu all over again

    Déjà vu all over again

    It’s "déjà vu all over again" on the Tuesday Memo / Econ Minute podcast.
    A few days after Los Angeles declares a state of emergency on homeless, Portland's Mayor Charlie Hales enters "me too" mode and declares a state of emergency in Portland ... even though homelessness has been an emergency since he was city commissioner 20 years ago.
    Yet again, even though the city can't find money for homelessness or streets ... Portland has $3.3 million to pour into the streetcar for - get this - marketing!
    Citizen activists get a ballot title to change the make-up of city council. Now, can they get the signatures?

    Here's how you can hear more:
    Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
    The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

    For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

    For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

    • 22 min

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