17 episodi

"Save poetry read a poem" nasce con l'obbiettivo di diffondere la poesia e fare in modo che chiunque possa ascoltarla e apprezzarla. Perché la poesia è per tutti.

Save Poetry, Read a Poem Carlotta Cimenti

    • Libri
    • 5.0, 3 valutazioni

"Save poetry read a poem" nasce con l'obbiettivo di diffondere la poesia e fare in modo che chiunque possa ascoltarla e apprezzarla. Perché la poesia è per tutti.

    Il calamaio - Gianni Rodari

    Il calamaio - Gianni Rodari

    Che belle parole
    se si potesse scrivere
    con un raggio di sole.

    Che parole d’argento
    se si potesse scrivere
    con un filo di vento.

    Ma in fondo al calamaio
    c’è un tesoro nascosto
    e chi lo pesca
    scriverà parole d’oro
    col più nero inchiostro.

    • 24 sec
    Sonnet CXXIX - William Shakespeare

    Sonnet CXXIX - William Shakespeare

    The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
    Is lust in action: and till action, lust
    Is perjured, murderous, bloody, full of blame,
    Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust;
    Enjoyed no sooner but despised straight;
    Past reason hunted; and no sooner had,
    Past reason hated, as a swallowed bait,
    On purpose laid to make the taker mad.
    Mad in pursuit and in possession so;
    Had, having, and in quest to have extreme;
    A bliss in proof, and proved, a very woe;
    Before, a joy proposed; behind a dream.
    All this the world well knows; yet none knows well
    To shun the heaven that leads men to this hell.

    • 1m
    Già la pioggia è con noi - Salvatore Quasimodo

    Già la pioggia è con noi - Salvatore Quasimodo

    Già la pioggia è con noi
    scuote l’aria silenziosa.
    Le rondini sfiorano le acque
    presso i laghetti lombardi,
    volano come gabbiani sui piccoli pesci;
    il fieno odora oltre i recinti degli orti.
    Ancora un giorno è bruciato,
    senza un lamento, senza un grido
    levato a vincere d’improvviso un giorno.

    • 30 sec
    La belle dame sans merci - John Keats

    La belle dame sans merci - John Keats

    O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
    Alone and palely loitering?
    The sedge has wither'd from the lake,
    And no birds sing.

    O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
    So haggard and so woe-begone?
    The squirrel's granary is full,
    And the harvest's done.

    I see a lily on thy brow
    With anguish moist and fever dew,
    And on thy cheeks a fading rose
    Fast withereth too.

    I met a lady in the meads,
    Full beautiful—a faery's child,
    Her hair was long, her foot was light,
    And her eyes were wild.

    I made a garland for her head,
    And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
    She look'd at me as she did love,
    And made sweet moan.

    I set her on my pacing steed,
    And nothing else saw all day long,
    For sidelong would she bend, and sing
    A faery's song.

    She found me roots of relish sweet,
    And honey wild, and manna dew,
    And sure in language strange she said—
    "I love thee true."

    She took me to her elfin grot,
    And there she wept, and sigh'd full sore,
    And there I shut her wild wild eyes
    With kisses four.

    And there she lulled me asleep.
    And there I dream'd—Ah! woe betide
    The latest dream I ever dream'd
    On the cold hill's side.

    I saw pale kings and princes too,
    Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
    They cried—"La Belle Dame sans Merci
    Hath thee in thrall!"

    I saw their starved lips in the gloam,
    With horrid warning gaped wide,
    And I awoke and found me here,
    On the cold hill's side.

    And is this is why I sojourn here,
    Alone and palely loitering,
    Though the sedge is wither'd from the lake,
    And no birds sing.

    • 2 min
    Il vetro rotto - Umberto Saba

    Il vetro rotto - Umberto Saba

    Tutto si muove contro te. Il maltempo,
    le luci che si spengono, la vecchia
    casa scossa a una raffica e a te cara
    per il male sofferto, le speranze
    deluse, qualche bene in lei goduto.
    Ti pare il sopravvivere un rifiuto
    d'obbedienza alle cose.
    E nello schianto
    del vetro alla finestra è la condanna.

    • 26 sec
    Sonnet CXXX - William Shakespeare

    Sonnet CXXX - William Shakespeare

    My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
    Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
    If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
    If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
    I have seen roses damask'd, red and white,
    But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
    And in some perfumes is there more delight
    Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
    I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
    That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
    I grant I never saw a goddess go;
    My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
       And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
       As any she belied with false compare.

    • 56 sec

Recensioni dei clienti

5.0 su 5
3 valutazioni

3 valutazioni

imwonderwall ,

Splendido

La poesia è di tutti e meno male che c’è la splendida voce di Carlotta a ricordarcelo.

Top podcast nella categoria Libri