40 episodi

Every semester the Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics invites a distinguished theoretical physicist in order to present a short series of lectures with increasing level of specialization. Usually it includes a public talk for a general audience, a theory colloquium and a specialized seminar.

Sommerfeld Lecture Series (ASC) Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

    • Scienze

Every semester the Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics invites a distinguished theoretical physicist in order to present a short series of lectures with increasing level of specialization. Usually it includes a public talk for a general audience, a theory colloquium and a specialized seminar.

    • video
    Theory Colloquium: Scaling Down the Laws of Thermodynamics

    Theory Colloquium: Scaling Down the Laws of Thermodynamics

    Thermodynamics provides a robust conceptual framework and
    set of laws that govern the exchange of energy and matter.
    Although these laws were originally articulated for macroscopic
    objects, nanoscale systems also exhibit “thermodynamic-like”
    behavior – for instance, biomolecular motors convert chemical
    fuel into mechanical work. To what extent can the laws of
    thermodynamics be scaled down to apply to individual
    microscopic systems, and what new features emerge at the
    nanoscale? I will describe some of the recent progress and
    challenges associated with addressing these questions.

    • 1h 13 min
    • video
    Statistical Physics Seminar: Quantum Impulse Control

    Statistical Physics Seminar: Quantum Impulse Control

    The quantum adiabatic theorem governs the evolution of a
    wavefunction under a slowly time-varying Hamiltonian. I will
    consider the opposite limit of a Hamiltonian that is varied
    impulsively: a strong perturbation U(x,t) is applied over a time
    interval of infinitesimal duration e->0. When the strength of the
    perturbation scales like 1/eˆ2, there emerges an interesting
    dynamical behavior characterized by an abrupt displacement of
    the wave function in coordinate space. I will solve for the
    evolution of the wavefunction in this situation. Remarkably, the
    solution involves a purely classical construction, yet describes
    the quantum evolution exactly, rather than approximately. I will
    use these results to show how appropriately tailored impulses
    can be used to control the behavior of a quantum wavefunction.

    • 1h 6 min
    • video
    Public Lecture: Adventures of an Idea – the Life and Travels of Maxwell’s Demon

    Public Lecture: Adventures of an Idea – the Life and Travels of Maxwell’s Demon

    In a letter written in 1867, James Clerk Maxwell described a
    hypothetical creature: a “neat-fingered being” capable of
    separating fast molecules from slow ones. Maxwell mused that
    such a creature would seem to violate the second law of
    thermodynamics, which had recently been enunciated by
    Rudolf Clausius and is now a pillar of our understanding of the
    natural world. Over the past century and a half, that hypothetical creature – Maxwell’s demon – has wandered through
    the thoughts of eminent scientists, has appeared in research
    articles and popular cultural references, and in recent years has
    been observed in laboratory experiments. Along the way, the
    mischievous devil has sharpened our understanding of the
    second law of thermodynamics, exposing a deep relationship
    between physics and information. I will give an overview of the
    questions raised and the lessons learned from contemplating
    Maxwell’s demon, and I will summarize our current understanding of this topic. This story highlights the importance of
    imagination and whimsy in scientific discovery.

    • 1h 12 min
    • video
    Theory Colloquium: When a Symmetry Breaks

    Theory Colloquium: When a Symmetry Breaks

    Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking is a very universal concept applicable for a wide range of subjects: crystal, superfluid, neutron stars, Higgs boson, magnets, and many others. Yet there is a variety in the spectrum of gapless excitations even when the symmetry breaking patterns are the same. We unified all known examples of internal symmetries in a single-line Lagrangian of the low-energy effective theory. In addition, we now have a better understanding of what happens with spacetime symmetries, and predict gaps for certain states
    exactly based on symmetries alone.

    • 1h 25 min
    • video
    Public Lecture: Quantum Universe

    Public Lecture: Quantum Universe

    Where do we come from? Science is making progress on this age-old question of humankind. The Universe was once much smaller than the size of an atom. Small things mattered in the small Universe, where quantum physics dominated the scene.
    To understand the way the Universe is today, we have to solve remaining major puzzles. The Higgs boson that was discovered recently is holding our body together from evaporating in a nanosecond. But we still do not know what exactly it is. The
    mysterious dark matter is holding the galaxy together, and we would not have been born without it. But nobody has seen it directly. And what is the very beginning of the Universe?

    • 1h 10 min
    • video
    Fields and Strings Seminar: What is dark matter?

    Fields and Strings Seminar: What is dark matter?

    I review what we know about dark matter right now and some hints about its nature. In particular, I discuss candidates away from the conventional WIMP (Weakly Interactive Massive Particle) paradigm.

    • 1h 8 min

Top podcast nella categoria Scienze

Gli ascoltatori si sono iscritti anche a

Altri contenuti di Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München