300 episodi

What you need to know about money each week and what the news means for you, from the UK's best financial website.

This is Money Podcast This is Money

    • Investimenti

What you need to know about money each week and what the news means for you, from the UK's best financial website.

    Is furloughing workers the best way to save jobs in the coronavirus crisis?

    Is furloughing workers the best way to save jobs in the coronavirus crisis?

    Every year Collins Dictionary chooses its word of the year and just three months into 2020, it feels like coronavirus might be a shoe-in for the title.
    But among the other words likely to be picked as high-fliers, it seems that furlough will also be in with a shout.
    Until a few weeks ago, it's unlikely many people had ever considered what being furloughed would mean, but now it's the topic on many workers’ minds.
    The concept of asking workers to go on furlough lies at the heart of the government’s coronavirus jobs rescue scheme – as it seeks to stall firms making people redundant and offers to pay 80% of their wages up to £2,500 a month.
    But is picking up the wage bills of big businesses a wise move, will it help save jobs and is the price worth paying because the cost of not doing it is worse?
    On this week’s podcast, Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce and Georgie Frost discuss what it means to be furloughed and whether the emergency plan can work.
    They also look at the travel industry chaos and how airlines attempts to dig themselves out of a hole by dodging cash refunds is backfiring.
    Why aren’t people getting money back for cancelled flights – and is there a way forward that could help airlines and customers?
    Also on the agenda are the household bills rising at just the wrong time – and finally, at the opposite end of the scale, how did Agent Million deliver this month’s Premium Bond jackpot news to the lucky winners while still managing social distancing?

    • 44 min
    Will coronavirus sink the property market?

    Will coronavirus sink the property market?

    Britain is on lockdown and so is the property market.
    The Government has told people not to move home while the coronavirus lockdown is on, and the property market has been frozen as estate agents are instructed not to do viewings and valuations and surveys can’t happen.
    Meanwhile, banking giants Barclays and Halifax have axed a big chunk of their mortgage ranges – only offering new deals through brokers to those with the largest deposits – and the industry says it has been overwhelmed with requests for mortgage holidays.
    Amidst all this, many are asking the inevitable question: ‘What will happen to house prices?’
    On this week’s podcast, Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce and Georgie Frost look at what buyers and sellers can do, how the freeze is affecting those due to move, and explore what could happen next for the property market.
    They also discuss Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s rescue package for the self-employed and why it is a welcome measure that seems to have some glaring gaps.
    And finally, among all this coronavirus chaos, the team remind listeners not to forget the tax deadline and why in troubled times it’s even more important to use the tax-friendly investing and saving that pensions and Isas provide.
    We won’t send a drone round to make sure you do it, but you’ve been warned.

    • 52 min
    Will helicopter money save us from the coronavirus crisis?

    Will helicopter money save us from the coronavirus crisis?

    Britain has been told to stay at home, pubs have been ordered to shut and you’re not even allowed to go to the gym instead.
    The coronavirus crisis has turned the consumer economy upside down. Businesses and workers risk going bust on an almost unprecedented level, unless a rescue plan that works can be cooked up.
    Cutting interest rates and quantitative easing was the medicine in the financial crisis, but that’s not working this time round, so is it time to start up the helicopter and drop some money.
    Helicopter money, people’s QE and a universal basic income are three of the highly unusual measures suggested, as we go through the back of the financial looking glass.
    All involve handing out money directly to people and businesses to combat a global economic crisis triggered by pressing the pause button, but is that wise?
    On this week’s podcast, we discuss why rescue attempts so far have failed to stop share prices falling, how Chancellor Rishi Sunak stepped things up with a £350billion bailout plan, and what might happen next, with ideas such as helicopter money, people’s QE and universal basic income.
    We also discuss how the interest rate cut to a historic low of 0.1 per cent will affect borrowers and savers, how brave investors can buy in if they are willing to risk some money on a future bounce back, and why supermarkets are unable to keep up with panic buying.
    And finally, if the podcast audio isn’t up to the usual standards, please accept our apologies, we are working hard to make sure we can keep recording without access to a studio.

    • 59 min
    The Budget, the base rate cut and the stock market crash

    The Budget, the base rate cut and the stock market crash

    Well, what a week. We've had a Budget, a 0.5 per cent base rate cut and stock markets going haywire thanks to coronavirus and oil price crashes.
    Why did the Bank of England cut rates to 0.25 per cent on the morning of the Budget and what are policymakers hoping to achieve?
    How did Rishi Sunak perform in his first Budget as Chancellor and what was announced in his speech?
    On Thursday, the FTSE 100 saw its second biggest dive on record. What is happening to the markets and where does it end?
    On this week's podcast, Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce and Georgie Frost, dissect what has been one of the most turbulent weeks in living memory.
    In the Budget, we had a number of coronavirus measures – but also some titbits of personal finance news that could hit the pound in your pocket.
    We also look at what coronavirus means for travel insurance and your refund rights to events

    • 1h 4 min
    Does Nationwide's savings lottery show there's still life in the cash Isa?

    Does Nationwide's savings lottery show there's still life in the cash Isa?

    Every year, between March and April, there used to be a cash Isa season. Banks and building societies clambered over each other in the race to top the best buy tables.
    This hasn't been the case for a while. However, Nationwide - with a new savings lottery - and Coventry - with a new deal - have offered signs of some green shoots this year, but is it even worth having a tax-free savings account anymore?
    On this week's podcast, Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce and Georgie Frost go to Isa-town, to talk cash savings deals, the best services to invest, and how to overcome the fear that coronavirus-induced stock market falls have delivered.  
    Elsewhere, the coronavirus also hit the Geneva Motor Show, but the motor industry decided many of the launches could take place online instead. 
    What cars were unveiled? Well it broadly fell into two camps, very expensive limited edition hypercars and electric cars that might be the future for the mass market. Simon and Lee talk through the best of them.
    Meanwhile, a reader takes the taxman to court over a child benefit penalty and finally Lee cracks open a low-alcohol beer at Adnams brewery, in Suffolk, and asks: has the taste become better... and why?

    • 48 min
    Making the Money Work: Shappi Khorsandi on getting comedy to pay the bills?

    Making the Money Work: Shappi Khorsandi on getting comedy to pay the bills?

    On this episode of Making the Money Work podcast, comedian Shappi Khorsandi joins Andi Peters and Simon Lambert to discuss how she built a career in comedy, her unusual life as the daughter of an exiled Iranian poet - and how she once hired Alan Carr to work in a charity call centre.
    This is the final episode of five in the Making the Money Work series, in partnership with FSCS, that has appeared in the This is Money podcast feed every fortnight since the start of the year. We hope you have enjoyed them.
    Your usual This is Money podcast will continue to be published every Friday
    How do you make comedy pay the bills?
    That’s not a problem for the handful of star names with giant arena tours, but what about the majority of comedians who’ve dedicated a life’s work to standing up and making people laugh without raking in millions?
    Shappi tells of her route to becoming a comedian and how she realised a job in an office wasn’t for her early on, swapping that for being a cleaner and nude life model for art students - because she could do those jobs while daydreaming. 
    Later on, she says having stripped off to sit for artists meant she was less worried about getting up on stage and doing stand-up in front of a crowd.
    The comedian, who has appeared on popular TV shows including Have I Got News for You, QI, Live at the Apollo and Mock the Week, is a single mother-of-two who supports her and her two children alone and has struggled to make ends meet.
    Shappi says she spent many years being ‘skint’ but that when her career took off, she was so taken aback at suddenly having money that she had to learn she had earned it and was worth it, and not to be overly generous in giving it away.
    She says she loves her work so much that she cannot imagine ever doing anything else, but now plans her comedy and writing so that the money she earns enables her to spend the time she wants to with her children.
    And as for the money she earned for doing I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out of Here? 
    That, says Shappi, bought her entire year of bedtimes with her children.

    • 26 min

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