62 episodes

This is the Mental Health Foundation podcast. A series in which we bring to you a range of mental health topics, real life stories, expert comments and mental health tips.

Mental Health Foundation podcast Mental Health Foundation

    • Health & Fitness

This is the Mental Health Foundation podcast. A series in which we bring to you a range of mental health topics, real life stories, expert comments and mental health tips.

    Coronavirus pandemic and mental health

    Coronavirus pandemic and mental health

    What is the Mental Health Foundation Podcast?
    This is the Mental Health Foundation podcast. A series which brings to you a range of mental health topics, real life stories, expert comments, and mental health tips.

    Bethan Buswell is your producer and host. She has her own lived experience of mental health problems and with this podcast she and the Mental Health Foundation want to raise awareness, get people talking and provide support and hope.

    **Remember to rate, like, review and subscribe**

    !Before we introduce the episode, we want to remind you that government advice designed to keep us safe during the Covid-19 outbreak is under constant review and will be different depending on where you live. Please remember to keep up to date via reputable sources.

    On today’s episode Bethan talks to you about the coronavirus pandemic and its effect on our mental health.

    We recorded this episode in early September 2020 when for many of us, we had been seeing a gradual easing of lockdown, children heading back to school, students back to uni and some people heading back to work. For some people this brought longed-for opportunities. But for many, even the happy, much anticipated changes were difficult for our mental health. And lastly, we are still far from knowing what the pandemic means for our society moving forward...

    So, on the show we want to explore these big themes – and Bethan has some great guests to help her tackle them. Firstly, she will be speaking to, Suba, a junior doctor who has been working in the Emergency Department of an NHS hospital in London during the coronavirus outbreak. Then Dr David Crepaz-Keay, who is the Head of Applied Learning at the Foundation. He will talk us through what has been happening with mental health in the UK during the coronavirus pandemic. Lastly, we finish with Bethan and Linda Liao, Digital Manager at the Mental Health Foundation sharing some tips on how we can look after our mental health during these uncertain times...

    Enjoy the show!

    Coronavirus and mental health hub
    We have created a coronavirus and mental health hub filled with advice on how to look after your mental health during the coronavirus outbreak.
    Find out more here: mentalhealth.org.uk/coronavirus

    Who’s on the show today?
    Bethan Buswell: Producer & host, Digital Engagement Officer at the Foundation
    Suba: Guest, Junior Doctor
    Podcast:
    Bio: mentalhealth.org.uk/about-us/people/bethan-buswell
    David Crepaz-Keay: Guest, Head of Applied Learning, at the Foundation
    Bio: https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/about-us/people/dr-david-crepaz-keay
    Linda Liao: Guest, Digital Manager, at the Foundation
    Podcast editor: Tim Butcher, filmmaker, podcast editor, writer, and producer
    Website: timbutcher.co.uk/

    Podcast episode links:
    https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/coronavirus
    https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/our-work/research/coronavirus-mental-health-pandemic/

    Find out more about the Mental Health Foundation:
    Website: mentalhealth.org.uk
    Instagram: instagram.com/mentalhealthfoundation
    Facebook: facebook.com/mentalhealthfoundation
    Twitter: twitter.com/mentalhealth
    Get in touch with us: online@mentalhealth.org.uk
    Our podcast is also available on iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/mental-health-foundation-podcast/id665005881

    **Remember to rate, like, review and subscribe**

    Helplines
    If you are feeling like ending your life, please call 999 or go to A&E and ask for the contact of the nearest crisis resolution team. These are teams of mental health care professionals who work with people in severe distress.

    If you need someone to talk to then Samaritans are available on 116 123 (UK) for free, 24/7. They are there to talk to, listen and they won't judge or tell you what to do.

    C.A.L.M.: National helpline for men to talk about any troubles they are feeling. Call 0800 58 58 58.

    If you’re experiencing a personal crisis,

    • 52 min
    Creativity & innovation - The creative arts / Mental health in the community

    Creativity & innovation - The creative arts / Mental health in the community

    ‘Mental health in the community’ is a series of six podcasts brought to you by the Mental Health Foundation and the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.

    What is this series about?
    From 2016 to 2019 the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust ran the Mental Health Fellowships programme, funding individuals to travel abroad to learn more about how community-based solutions are being created to respond to some of today’s most pressing mental health challenges.

    The Mental Health Foundation was the expert partner in this programme, helping to shape its aims, select the successful candidates and provide mentoring to the successful Fellows. In total, 59 Churchill Fellows were chosen to investigate best practice in 18 countries and bring back new evidence and ideas to create positive change in their profession, practice and communities in the UK.

    This series of podcasts distils the key findings from this rich body of learning, and makes recommendations for policy and practice in the UK. Each episode focuses on an aspect of the Mental Health Fellowships’ overarching theme ‘community-based solutions’. There are also corresponding briefings for each of the categories below, available at www.mentalhealth.org.uk or www.wcmt.org.uk.

    Episode 2: Creativity and Innovation: the creative arts

    Who’s on the podcast today?
    Trevor Barnes: Host, freelance journalist and BBC radio presenter.

    Dr Kat Taylor: a clinical psychologist and art and mental health innovation programme manager at Greater Manchester i-Thrive, travelled to Finland and the USA (2017) to study initiatives embedding the arts into health care.

    Alison O’Connor: a psychotherapist, trainer and co-founder of Cardiff based Arts in Health organisation, Re-Live. Alison travelled to Bosnia and Herzegovina and the USA (2016) to investigate the impact of the creative arts on families and veterans affected by trauma and moral injury.

    What is the episode about?
    This episode features two Fellows’ findings about how the creative arts are being used abroad to support people’s mental health.

    We hear about the Dance Centre of Central Finland in Jyvaskyla where the Baby Dance Hour is an opportunity for mothers to play, sing and dance with their young children. Led by a professional dance teacher and supported by care staff, these sessions allow mother and baby to bond in the simplest and most natural of ways, generating habits of connection through touch, talk, movement and music that help to lay the foundations of good mental health for life.

    Trevor then interviews Alison O’Connor about how the performing arts are providing more holistic approaches for supporting veteran’s mental health, in addition to more traditional methods such as talking therapies.

    Need support?
     If you need someone to talk to then Samaritans are available on 116 123 (UK) for free, 24/7. They are there to talk to, listen and they won't judge or tell you what to do.
     C.A.L.M.: National helpline for men to talk about any troubles they are feeling. Call 0800 58 58 58 (UK). They are available 5pm-midnight 365 days a year.
     For support in a crisis, Text Shout to 85258. If you’re experiencing a personal crisis, are unable to cope and need support. Shout can help with urgent issues such as: Suicidal thoughts, abuse or assault, self-harm, bullying, relationship challenges.

    • 40 min
    Creativity & innovation - Digital technology / Mental health in the community

    Creativity & innovation - Digital technology / Mental health in the community

    ‘Mental health in the community’ is a series of six podcasts brought to you by the Mental Health Foundation and the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.

    What is this series about?
    From 2016 to 2019 the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust ran the Mental Health Fellowships programme, funding individuals to travel abroad to learn more about how community-based solutions are being created to respond to some of today’s most pressing mental health challenges.

    The Mental Health Foundation was the expert partner in this programme, helping to shape its aims, select the successful candidates and provide mentoring to the successful Fellows. In total, 59 Churchill Fellows were chosen to investigate best practice in 18 countries and bring back new evidence and ideas to create positive change in their profession, practice and communities in the UK.

    This series of podcasts distils the key findings from this rich body of learning, and makes recommendations for policy and practice in the UK. Each episode focuses on an aspect of the Mental Health Fellowships’ overarching theme ‘community-based solutions’. There are also corresponding briefings for each of the categories below, available at www.mentalhealth.org.uk or www.wcmt.org.uk.

    Episode 3: Creativity and Innovation: digital technologies

    Who’s on the podcast today?
    Trevor Barnes: Host, freelance journalist and BBC radio presenter.

    Rebecca Cotton: formerly Director of Mental Health Policy for the NHS Confederation, travelled to Australia and the USA in 2017 to research approaches to using digital technology in mental health support.

    Marcus Gardiner: a Software Developer and Management Consultant, travelled to the USA in 2018 to explore the use of digital technology to support good mental health in the workplace.

    Dr Erin Hope Thompson: founder and director of The Loss Foundation, travelled to the USA in 2017 to research best practice in bereavement support, with a particular focus on the role of digital technology.

    What is the episode about?
    This episode features details on a wide range of programmes abroad that are using digital technologies to support people’s mental health.

    Trevor interviews the three Fellows about the changing nature of the digital, artificial intelligence and machine learning landscape and the need for UK-based community mental health services to be attuned to these developments and learn from their ever-evolving applications across the world.

    We hear about the Dinner Party, a worldwide network helping 20-and 30-somethings who have experienced bereavement. Individuals who have lost a close friend or family member are encouraged to sign up to 'the club nobody wants to join' where they are carefully matched with people in their area who have suffered similar loss.

    Need support?
     If you need someone to talk to then Samaritans are available on 116 123 (UK) for free, 24/7. They are there to talk to, listen and they won't judge or tell you what to do.
     C.A.L.M.: National helpline for men to talk about any troubles they are feeling. Call 0800 58 58 58 (UK). They are available 5pm-midnight 365 days a year.
     For support in a crisis, Text Shout to 85258. If you’re experiencing a personal crisis, are unable to cope and need support. Shout can help with urgent issues such as: Suicidal thoughts, abuse or assault, self-harm, bullying, relationship challenges.

    • 37 min
    Equality & diversity / Mental health in the community

    Equality & diversity / Mental health in the community

    ‘Mental health in the community’ is a series of six podcasts brought to you by the Mental Health Foundation and the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.

    What is this series about?
    From 2016 to 2019 the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust ran the Mental Health Fellowships programme, funding individuals to travel abroad to learn more about how community-based solutions are being created to respond to some of today’s most pressing mental health challenges.

    The Mental Health Foundation was the expert partner in this programme, helping to shape its aims, select the successful candidates and provide mentoring to the successful Fellows. In total, 59 Churchill Fellows were chosen to investigate best practice in 18 countries and bring back new evidence and ideas to create positive change in their profession, practice and communities in the UK.

    This series of podcasts distils the key findings from this rich body of learning, and makes recommendations for policy and practice in the UK. Each episode focuses on an aspect of the Mental Health Fellowships’ overarching theme ‘community-based solutions’. There are also corresponding briefings for each of the categories below, available at www.mentalhealth.org.uk or www.wcmt.org.uk.

    Episode 1: Equality and Diversity

    Who’s on the podcast today?
    Trevor Barnes: Host, freelance journalist and BBC radio presenter.

    Erica Mapule Mcinnis: a chartered clinical psychologist, travelled to the USA (2016) to investigate African-centered psychological services for wellbeing.

    Jacqui Jobson: former Director of Advocacy at Connected Voice and freelance consultant, travelled to Australia and Canada (2017) to explore advocacy approaches addressing mental health among LGBT+ communities.

    What is the episode about?
    This episode on Equality and Diversity features Erica and Jacqui’s findings from Australia, Canada and the USA demonstrating how approaches abroad are being used to help reduce mental health inequalities and protect the rights of vulnerable groups.

    We hear about "Ascensions Psychological and Community Services" (which Erica visited in Washington DC) - a mental health service infused with black heritage. Operating from an ordinary house on an ordinary street in a predominantly black neighbourhood, it projects a pride in its African heritage that is immediately obvious to anyone entering the building.

    We also hear about programmes Jacqui visited in Sydney and Toronto that ensure that everyone in the organisation, from receptionists to therapists and counsellors, were either themselves from the LGBT+ community or had been professionally trained to understand and affirm the community's cultural sensitivities and world view.

    Need support?
     If you need someone to talk to then Samaritans are available on 116 123 (UK) for free, 24/7. They are there to talk to, listen and they won't judge or tell you what to do.
     C.A.L.M.: National helpline for men to talk about any troubles they are feeling. Call 0800 58 58 58 (UK). They are available 5pm-midnight 365 days a year.
     For support in a crisis, Text Shout to 85258. If you’re experiencing a personal crisis, are unable to cope and need support. Shout can help with urgent issues such as: Suicidal thoughts, abuse or assault, self-harm, bullying, relationship challenges.

    • 33 min
    Growing up & growing old / Mental health in the community

    Growing up & growing old / Mental health in the community

    ‘Mental health in the community’ is a series of six podcasts brought to you by the Mental Health Foundation and the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.

    What is this series about?
    From 2016 to 2019 the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust ran the Mental Health Fellowships programme, funding individuals to travel abroad to learn more about how community-based solutions are being created to respond to some of today’s most pressing mental health challenges.

    The Mental Health Foundation was the expert partner in this programme, helping to shape its aims, select the successful candidates and provide mentoring to the successful Fellows. In total, 59 Churchill Fellows were chosen to investigate best practice in 18 countries and bring back new evidence and ideas to create positive change in their profession, practice and communities in the UK.

    This series of podcasts distils the key findings from this rich body of learning, and makes recommendations for policy and practice in the UK. Each episode focuses on an aspect of the Mental Health Fellowships’ overarching theme ‘community-based solutions’. There are also corresponding briefings for each of the categories below, available at www.mentalhealth.org.uk or www.wcmt.org.uk.

    Episode 6: Growing up and growing old

    Who’s on the podcast today?
    Trevor Barnes: Host, freelance journalist and BBC radio presenter.

    Olivia Richards: teacher at St Paul’s C of E Primary School in Addlestone, Surrey and leader of The Story Project. Travelled to the USA and Canada in 2016 to explore how reading and writing can be used to teach young people social and emotional skills.

    David Humphreys: a family therapist, travelled to Canada and the USA in 2016 to explore ways of improving the involvement of family members in community mental health treatment.

    What is the episode about?
    This episode features discussions around how community-based approaches are being used abroad to support the mental health of both younger and older people.

    We hear about the 'The Story Project', the work of Churchill Fellow, Olivia Richards, who travelled to the US and Canada to study how reading and writing are used in schools to teach children and young people the kind of social and emotional skills that can nurture emotional literacy and offer protection from anxiety and depression in later life.

    Need support?
     If you need someone to talk to then Samaritans are available on 116 123 (UK) for free, 24/7. They are there to talk to, listen and they won't judge or tell you what to do.
     C.A.L.M.: National helpline for men to talk about any troubles they are feeling. Call 0800 58 58 58 (UK). They are available 5pm-midnight 365 days a year.
     For support in a crisis, Text Shout to 85258. If you’re experiencing a personal crisis, are unable to cope and need support. Shout can help with urgent issues such as: Suicidal thoughts, abuse or assault, self-harm, bullying, relationship challenges.

    • 37 min
    Trauma & adversity - Trauma-informed care / Mental health in the community

    Trauma & adversity - Trauma-informed care / Mental health in the community

    ‘Mental health in the community’ is a series of six podcasts brought to you by the Mental Health Foundation and the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.

    What is this series about?
    From 2016 to 2019 the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust ran the Mental Health Fellowships programme, funding individuals to travel abroad to learn more about how community-based solutions are being created to respond to some of today’s most pressing mental health challenges.

    The Mental Health Foundation was the expert partner in this programme, helping to shape its aims, select the successful candidates and provide mentoring to the successful Fellows. In total, 59 Churchill Fellows were chosen to investigate best practice in 18 countries and bring back new evidence and ideas to create positive change in their profession, practice and communities in the UK.

    This series of podcasts distils the key findings from this rich body of learning, and makes recommendations for policy and practice in the UK. Each episode focuses on an aspect of the Mental Health Fellowships’ overarching theme ‘community-based solutions’. There are also corresponding briefings for each of the categories below, available at www.mentalhealth.org.uk or www.wcmt.org.uk.

    Episode 5: Trauma and Adversity: trauma-informed care

    Who’s on the podcast today?
    Trevor Barnes: Host, freelance journalist and BBC radio presenter.

    Dr Karen Treisman: a clinical psychologist, trainer, and author, travelled to the USA to research international approaches to integrating adversity, culturally, and trauma-informed and responsive principles at a system-wide and organisational level.

    Daniel Johnson: forensic psychologist and service manager at Kibble Education and Care Centre, a specialist provider of child and youth care services, travelled to the USA, Norway and Sweden to investigate how trauma-informed principles have been turned into tangible practice in young people’s residential care services.

    What is the episode about?
    This episode features details of a number of leading trauma-informed organisations delivering services in a variety of community-based contexts abroad.

    We hear about Jasper Mountain, a large care, education and treatment centre in the Oregon forest, initially opened by a husband and wife who were practising therapists frustrated by the systems in which they worked. The main residential building is a castle, with a keep, large central hall and even a drawbridge. It has been built like this as children had said this was the structure they would prefer and in which they would feel most safe.

    Need support?
     If you need someone to talk to then Samaritans are available on 116 123 (UK) for free, 24/7. They are there to talk to, listen and they won't judge or tell you what to do.
     C.A.L.M.: National helpline for men to talk about any troubles they are feeling. Call 0800 58 58 58 (UK). They are available 5pm-midnight 365 days a year.
     For support in a crisis, Text Shout to 85258. If you’re experiencing a personal crisis, are unable to cope and need support. Shout can help with urgent issues such as: Suicidal thoughts, abuse or assault, self-harm, bullying, relationship challenges.

    • 33 min

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