62 episodes

Podcast by The Cheeky Natives

The Cheeky Natives The Cheeky Natives

    • Society & Culture

Podcast by The Cheeky Natives

    Natasha Omokhodion-Kalulu Banda: No Be From Hia

    Natasha Omokhodion-Kalulu Banda: No Be From Hia

    ‘My book was inspired by my multicultural background - Zambian, Nigerian, Jamaican and British. I wrote it at a time when I was processing the loss of both sets of grandparents, whom I had visited in Nigeria and in my Zambian village, Chinsali.’ Natasha Omokhodion-Kalulu Banda

    In a search for identity, love and acceptance two ordinary girls travel from London to Lusaka to Lagos in order to save their family and discover their identity.

    Maggie Ayomide and Bupe Kombe are cousins on either side of the world who couldn't be more different. Zambian-Nigerian and Zambian-Jamaican, both yearn for their disbanded family to reunite.

    The Cheeky Natives sat in conversation with Natasha to mediate on No Bia from Hia. We spoke about Migration, mother and daughter relationship, the sisterhood, men who harm and hurt and a meditation on loss and grief.

    • 50 min
    Brit Bennett: The Vanishing Half

    Brit Bennett: The Vanishing Half

    “The only difference between lying and acting was whether your audience was in on it, but it was all a performance just the same.”

    Born and raised in Southern California, Brit Bennett graduated from Stanford University and later earned her MFA in fiction at the University of Michigan, where she won a Hopwood Award in Graduate Short Fiction. In 2014, she received the Hurston/Wright Award for College Writers. She is a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree, and her debut novel The Mothers was a New York Times bestseller. Her second novel The Vanishing Half was an instant #1 New York Times bestseller. Her essays have been featured in The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, The Paris Review, and Jezebel.

    The Mother’s was a best selling debut and her sophomore release was named one of the best books of 2020.

    The Cheeky Natives sat down to discuss The Vanishing Half with her.
    A book exploring the lives of two identical sisters, Desiree and Stella Vignes. This book is a multi generational exploration of the wide ranging impacts of the choices people make in difficult circumstances.

    In a beautifully written page turner, Bennett asks the reader to imagine what difficulties lie at the intersection of grief, family and race.
    Bennett is a tour de force.

    • 52 min
    Brandon Taylor and Paul Mendez: Real Life and Rainbow Milk

    Brandon Taylor and Paul Mendez: Real Life and Rainbow Milk

    “It was a cool evening in late summer when Wallace, his father dead for several weeks, decided that he would meet his friends at the pier after all.” – Brandon Taylor

    “Jesse’s alarm went off at seven, but he’d barely slept. He was excited, if nervous; he’d been scared of London all his life but he was a man now and after a few months saving up, he was ready to do it. He’d found a hostel on the Internet, in Earl’s Court, for twelve pounds a night. He had three hundred pounds in his bank account and no responsibilities to anyone; he packed only what he absolutely needed – his best clothes, some under- wear, ten or so CDs, his Discman, the James Baldwin novel Another Country. He left his key and bible on his pillow” - Paul Mendez

    Shortlisted for 2020 Booker Prize, Real Life is Brandon Taylor’s debut. It explores the life of Wallace, a Black queer PhD student in a white institution. The novel takes place over a weekend. Hauntingly intimate, it puts a spotlight on violence - physically, emotional and structurally. In doing so, it enables us to question (toxic) masculinity.

    Rainbow Milk is an intersectional coming-of-age story, following nineteen-year-old Jesse McCarthy as he grapples with his racial and sexual identities against the backdrop of a Jehovah's Witness upbringing and the legacies of the Windrush generation. It allows us to imagine what freedom may look like for Black queer people.

    This episode is in search of tenderness for Black queer people. In this conversation, the writers speak about the place of location in their novels, how location is used as a literary device – a break from a past. It touches on the shame that is often experienced by Black queer people and how it influences the way that they date. The writers also touches on the pervasiveness of religion and how it adds to the self-loathing.

    In many ways, this episode is a gathering of Black queer people around the world holding space for each other to live more fuller. It is a conversation that pulls at the heart strings.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Phumlani Pikoli: The Fatuous State of Severity

    Phumlani Pikoli: The Fatuous State of Severity

    "The Fatuous State of Severity - a mouthful for most - was a state of mind I had learned to occupy while recuperating from a depressive episode at a psychiatric clinic.” - Phumlani Pikoli

    The Fatuous State of Severity is a debut collection of short stories written by Pikoli while he was recovering from depression in a psychiatric clinic. The book has stories about mental health and its effect on our lives, both directly and indirectly. The stories also explore themes surrounding the experiences of a generation of young, urban South Africans coping with the tensions of social media, language insecurities and relationships of various kinds.

    Intense and provocative, this new edition of the book, which was first self-published in 2016, features six additional stories as well as an introductory essay on Phumlani Pikoli’s publishing journey.

    This episode happened at the beginning of the year where Phumlani had his first exhibition at the Tomorrow Gallery. In the episode, we speak about mental health, social media, male intimacy in a familial context, relationship and suicide ideations. We also spoke about the exhibition and how it came to life and what conversations it will generate. We also touch on writers that inspire Pikoli.

    • 54 min
    Lockdown Edition with Angela Makholwa: The Blessed Girl (Part 2)

    Lockdown Edition with Angela Makholwa: The Blessed Girl (Part 2)

    Even as a young child, Angela Makholwa wanted to be a storyteller. Her first story was published at 13 and from then on a lifetime relationship with words was established. After graduating with a journalism degree, Angela worked as a journalist prior to establishing her own PR and events management company.

    She has written several novels including Red Ink, 30th Candle and Black Widow Society.

    Her most recent novel “The Blessed Girl “ published in the United Kingdom by Bloomsbury, was shortlisted for the Comedy Women in Print (CWIP) prize.

    She spoke to The Cheeky Natives about her literary journey and influences and what it’s meant to write about the interior lives of Black womxn.

    Angela is working on her fifth title “Critical but stable” and shared a few exciting tidbits from this story.

    • 43 min
    Lockdown Edition with Angela Makholwa: The Blessed Girl (Part 1)

    Lockdown Edition with Angela Makholwa: The Blessed Girl (Part 1)

    Even as a young child, Angela Makholwa wanted to be a storyteller. Her first story was published at 13 and from then on a lifetime relationship with words was established. After graduating with a journalism degree, Angela worked as a journalist prior to establishing her own PR and events management company.

    She has written several novels including Red Ink, 30th Candle and Black Widow Society.

    Her most recent novel “The Blessed Girl “ published in the United Kingdom by Bloomsbury, was shortlisted for the Comedy Women in Print (CWIP) prize.

    She spoke to The Cheeky Natives about her literary journey and influences and what it’s meant to write about the interior lives of Black womxn.

    Angela is working on her fifth title “Critical but stable” and shared a few exciting tidbits from this story.

    • 55 min

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To