3 min

Tuesday April 15: He Took Our Nature Sabbath School Lesson podcast

    • Spirituality

Many of His contemporaries considered Jesus an unusual person,
yet they each knew Him to be a human being, a man. When the
Samaritan woman rushed to her village to spread the word about the
unusual Jew she just had met at the well, her announcement was
straightforward: “ ‘Come, see a man’ ” (John 4:29, NIV). Hers was the
universal testimony of Jesus’ contemporaries. Even after He had
calmed the storm, the exclamation of those closest to Him was,
“ ‘What kind of man is this?’ ” (Matt. 8:27, NIV).

Howdo the following texts help support the fact that Jesus was a genuine
human being of flesh and blood?

Matt. 8:24
Matt. 21:18
John 4:5,6
John 4:7, 19:28
John 11:33-35

While on earth, Jesus voluntarily surrendered the independent exercise
of the Divine attributes. He surrendered; He did not relinquish.
The attributes remained in Him. He could have used them at any time
for His own advantage, but He did not. The temptation to call on these
attributes to extricate Himself from difficulty (in ways not open to us)
was a major ingredient of His daily trials.
It is helpful to keep in mind that the Scriptures are not definitive on
every point that stirs our interest. They make no overt attempt, for
example, to spell out precisely how the human and Divine components
of Jesus’ nature are related. But they make it clear that Christ
was one unified person. They do not discuss the technicalities of this
union, limiting themselves, rather, to the clear confession that such a
union did occur, that the Son made of a woman was, indeed, the Son
of God (Gal. 4:4). “Christ did not make-believe take human nature;
He did verily take it. He did in reality possess human nature.”—Ellen
G. White, Lift Him Up, p. 74.

Why is Christ’s humanity so important to us? What does it mean
to us to know that Jesus became a human being? How does it
encourage you to know that Jesus shared our human limitations?

Many of His contemporaries considered Jesus an unusual person,
yet they each knew Him to be a human being, a man. When the
Samaritan woman rushed to her village to spread the word about the
unusual Jew she just had met at the well, her announcement was
straightforward: “ ‘Come, see a man’ ” (John 4:29, NIV). Hers was the
universal testimony of Jesus’ contemporaries. Even after He had
calmed the storm, the exclamation of those closest to Him was,
“ ‘What kind of man is this?’ ” (Matt. 8:27, NIV).

Howdo the following texts help support the fact that Jesus was a genuine
human being of flesh and blood?

Matt. 8:24
Matt. 21:18
John 4:5,6
John 4:7, 19:28
John 11:33-35

While on earth, Jesus voluntarily surrendered the independent exercise
of the Divine attributes. He surrendered; He did not relinquish.
The attributes remained in Him. He could have used them at any time
for His own advantage, but He did not. The temptation to call on these
attributes to extricate Himself from difficulty (in ways not open to us)
was a major ingredient of His daily trials.
It is helpful to keep in mind that the Scriptures are not definitive on
every point that stirs our interest. They make no overt attempt, for
example, to spell out precisely how the human and Divine components
of Jesus’ nature are related. But they make it clear that Christ
was one unified person. They do not discuss the technicalities of this
union, limiting themselves, rather, to the clear confession that such a
union did occur, that the Son made of a woman was, indeed, the Son
of God (Gal. 4:4). “Christ did not make-believe take human nature;
He did verily take it. He did in reality possess human nature.”—Ellen
G. White, Lift Him Up, p. 74.

Why is Christ’s humanity so important to us? What does it mean
to us to know that Jesus became a human being? How does it
encourage you to know that Jesus shared our human limitations?

3 min