107 episodes

Parts Per Billion is Bloomberg Law's environmental policy podcast. We cover everything from air pollution, to toxic chemicals, to corporate sustainability, and climate change. The reporters from our environment desk offer an inside look at what's happening at Congress, in the courts, and at the federal agencies, and help explain the scientific and policy debates shaping environmental laws and regulations. Host: David Schultz

Parts Per Billion Bloomberg Law

    • Nature

Parts Per Billion is Bloomberg Law's environmental policy podcast. We cover everything from air pollution, to toxic chemicals, to corporate sustainability, and climate change. The reporters from our environment desk offer an inside look at what's happening at Congress, in the courts, and at the federal agencies, and help explain the scientific and policy debates shaping environmental laws and regulations. Host: David Schultz

    Water Shortage Hits Tribes, But Is Mining to Blame?

    Water Shortage Hits Tribes, But Is Mining to Blame?

    With the coronavirus spreading rapidly, several American Indian reservations in the Southwest are experiencing extreme water shortages, a problem worsened by poor water infrastructure.
    Though no one denies the acuteness of the problem, what is in dispute is who's to blame. Activists and environmentalists in these communities say decades of water-intensive coal mining has caused a dramatic drop in their aquifer. But the company that ran these now-shuttered coal mines disagrees.
    On this episode of Parts Per Billion, Bloomberg Law correspondent Tripp Baltz explains the effect this dispute is having on these tribal communities and why Congress may be about to step in.

    • 18 min
    Bird Killing Plan Uses 'Sully' Plane Crash as Rationale

    Bird Killing Plan Uses 'Sully' Plane Crash as Rationale

    The Trump Administration is putting forth a proposal that would eliminate, in some cases, the penalties for killing protected bird species. And, according to Bloomberg Law reporter Bobby Magill, it got pretty creative in justifying why it believes this move is necessary.
    On this episode of Parts Per Billion, Magill explains how the administration cited 2009's "Miracle on the Hudson" plane crash as a reason why allowing more birds to be killed might be a good thing.

    • 17 min
    Even Pandemic Can't Stop Shift to Renewable Energy

    Even Pandemic Can't Stop Shift to Renewable Energy

    You would think that record low fossil fuel prices would spell certain doom for the future of solar, wind, and other forms of renewable energy. But you'd be wrong.
    At least, that's according to Albert Cheung, the head of global analysis at the research group Bloomberg New Energy Finance.
    Cheung joins Parts Per Billion to talk about why the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic likely won't stop renewable energy from slowly but steadily replacing other forms of energy in the coming decades.

    • 19 min
    For PFAS Plaintiffs, Delays Starting to Add Up

    For PFAS Plaintiffs, Delays Starting to Add Up

    The litigation over the toxic nonstick substances known as PFAS—or also known by their nickname "forever chemicals"—was already going to be pretty complicated. But now the pandemic has dialed that complexity up to a whole new level.
    On this week's episode of Parts Per Billion, reporter Ellen M. Gilmer talks about the delays these high stakes lawsuits have suffered in recent months and about whether one side in these types of disputes benefits more than the other when court deadlines get postponed.
    And to check out our new landing page that collects all of Bloomberg Law's reporting on PFAS, click here.

    • 19 min
    California Climate Rules Not Made for Pandemic Times

    California Climate Rules Not Made for Pandemic Times

    California has some of the most aggressive climate change regulations of any state in the country. But, with greenhouse gas emissions plummeting due to the economic shutdown, those regulations may actually be backfiring.

    On this week's episode of Parts Per Billion, Bloomberg News reporter David R. Baker explains how the Golden State's so-called "cap-and-trade" system for greenhouse gasses is struggling to function in a pandemic-afflicted world. 

    • 13 min
    Coronavirus Is in Air, on Surfaces and Even in Sewage

    Coronavirus Is in Air, on Surfaces and Even in Sewage

    The human body isn't the only place the coronavirus can be found. Pieces of the pathogen can be found throughout the environment, even in the waste we flush down the toilet.
    On this week's episode of Parts Per Billion, reporter Sylvia Carignan explains how environmental testing for the coronavirus might work and why scientists are asking the EPA to get to work developing a standard method of testing.

    • 12 min

Listeners Also Subscribed To