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Build your vocabulary with Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day! Each day a Merriam-Webster editor offers insight into a fascinating new word -- explaining its meaning, current use, and little-known details about its origin.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day Merriam-Webster

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    • 3.7、20件の評価

Build your vocabulary with Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day! Each day a Merriam-Webster editor offers insight into a fascinating new word -- explaining its meaning, current use, and little-known details about its origin.

    gamut

    gamut

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 30, 2020 is: gamut \GAM-ut\ noun
    1 : the whole series of recognized musical notes

    2 : an entire range or series

    Examples:

    "Possibly the most interesting man-made structural material is [reinforced concrete](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reinforced%20concrete)…. It is economical, available almost everywhere, fire-resistant, and can be designed to be light-weight to reduce the [dead load](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dead%20load) or to have a whole gamut of strengths to satisfy structural needs." — [Mario Salvadori, Why Buildings Stand Up, 1990](https://www.google.com/books/edition/WhyBuildingsStandUp/N9PMTsCLTEAC?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=%22Possibly+the+most+interesting+man-made+structural+material%22&pg=PA66&printsec=frontcover)

    "[Beverly] Long, whose previous novels run a limited gamut from romance to paranormal romance to romantic suspense, scores well in her transition to hard-boiled thriller." — [Jay Strafford, The Free Lance-Star (Fredericksburg, Virginia), 21 Mar. 2020](https://www.fredericksburg.com/entertainment/arts/books/march-mysteries-roundup-stay-at-home-and-play-detective-with-these-superior-whodunits/article933932e0-f7e2-525a-a06c-e9ad64ebdff0.html)

    Did you know?

    To get the lowdown on gamut, we have to dive to the bottom of a musical scale to which the 11th-century musician and monk Guido of Arezzo applied his particular system of [solmization](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/solmization)—that is, of using syllables to denote the tones of a musical scale. Guido called the first line of his bass staff gamma and the first note in his scale ut, which meant that gamma ut was the term for a note written on the first staff line. In time, gamma ut underwent a shortening to gamut but climbed the scale of meaning. It expanded to cover all the notes of Guido's scale, then to cover all the notes in the range of an instrument, and, eventually, to cover an entire range of any sort.

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    assail

    assail

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 29, 2020 is: assail \uh-SAIL\ verb
    1 : to attack violently : [assault](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/assault#h2)

    2 : to encounter, undertake, or confront energetically

    3 : to oppose, challenge, or criticize harshly and forcefully

    4 a : to trouble or afflict in a manner that threatens to overwhelm

    b : to be perceived by (a person, a person's senses, etc.) in a strongly noticeable and usually unpleasant way

    Examples:

    Most worthwhile achievements require that one persevere even when assailed by doubts.

    "What does it even mean to be good in a world as complex as ours, when great inequity remains unaddressed and often seems too daunting to assail, and when seemingly benign choices—which shoes to buy, which fruit to eat—can come with the moral baggage of large carbon footprints or the undercompensated labor of migrant workers?" — [Nancy Kaffer, The Detroit (Michigan) Free Press, 9 Jan. 2020](https://www.freep.com/story/opinion/columnists/nancy-kaffer/2020/01/09/the-good-place-episodes-series-finale-nbc/4412276002/)

    Did you know?

    Assail comes from an Anglo-French verb, assaillir, which itself traces back to the Latin verb assilire ("to leap upon"). Assilire combines the prefix ad- ("to, toward") with the Latin verb salire, meaning "to leap." (Salire is the root of a number of English words related to jumping or leaping, such as [somersault](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/somersault) and [sally](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sally), as well as [assault](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/assault), a synonym of assail.) When assail was first used in the 13th century, it meant "to make a violent physical attack upon." By the early 15th century, English speakers were using the term to mean "to attack with words or arguments." Now the verb can refer to any kind of aggressive encounter, even if it is not necessarily violent or quarrelsome, as in "Upon entering the room, we were assailed by a horrible odor."

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    empirical

    empirical

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 28, 2020 is: empirical \im-PEER-uh-kul\ adjective
    1 : originating in or based on observation or experience

    2 : relying on experience or observation alone often without due regard for system and theory 

    3 : capable of being verified or disproved by observation or experiment 

    4 : of or relating to [empiricism](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/empiricism)

    Examples:

    "'We have really good empirical research dating back to the 1980s demonstrating that kids who are restricted around treat foods often just want to eat them more,' said Charlotte Markey, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at Rutgers University…." — [Virginia Sole-Smith, The New York Times, 17 Apr. 2020](https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/17/parenting/halloween-candy-rules.html)

    "Burger King's advertising has been telling us that the Impossible Whopper tastes just like a Whopper. And so, in the spirit of empirical science and discovery, I ventured to a Burger King this week to test the claim." — [Eric Felten, The Examiner (Washington, DC), 31 Oct. 2019](https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/burger-kings-impossible-whopper-is-the-first-step-on-the-road-to-state-enforced-vegetarianism)

    Did you know?

    When empirical first appeared as an adjective in English, it meant simply "in the manner of an empiric." An empiric was a member of an ancient sect of doctors who practiced medicine based exclusively on observation or experience as contrasted with those who relied on theory or philosophy. The name empiric derives from Latin empīricus, itself from Greek empeirikós, meaning "based on observation (of medical treatment), experienced." The root of the Greek word (-peiros) is a derivative of peîra, meaning "attempt, trial, test."

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    longueur

    longueur

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 27, 2020 is: longueur \lawn-GUR\ noun
    : a dull and tedious passage or section (as of a book, play, or musical composition) — usually used in plural

    Examples:

    The otherwise crisp pacing of the movie is marred by some unnecessary longueurs that do little to advance the main story.

    "Small, clever musicals are fragile things, though, and I don't want to oversell this one in praising it. 'Scotland, PA' still needs to cure a few structural hiccups (the first act seems to end twice) and to address its longueurs and lapses of logic." — [Jesse Green, The New York Times, 23 Oct. 2019](https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/23/theater/scotland-pa-review.html)

    Did you know?

    You've probably come across long, tedious sections of books, plays, or musical works before, but perhaps you didn't know there was a word for them. English speakers began using the French borrowing longueur in the late 18th century. As in English, French longueurs are tedious passages, with longueur itself literally meaning "length." An early example of longueur used in an English text is from 18th-century writer Horace Walpole, who wrote in a letter, "Boswell's book is gossiping; . . . but there are woful longueurs, both about his hero and himself."

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    homonymous

    homonymous

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 26, 2020 is: homonymous \hoh-MAH-nuh-mus\ adjective
    1 : [ambiguous](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ambiguous)

    2 : having the same designation

    3 : of, relating to, or being [homonyms](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/homonyms)

    Examples:

    "The Chelyabinsk meteorite became a media celebrity after the videos of its explosion in mid-air, occurring in February 2013 near the homonymous city, went viral on social networks." — [Luca Maltagliati, Nature, 17 Feb. 2017](https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-017-0076)

    "Like the bird homonymous with his name, 'Cro' operates like he's under the cover of night. Though Cromartie's numerically best game came against Tulane this fall, in which the senior recorded six tackles and a sack, Downing tabbed South Florida and Connecticut as the raider's brightest." — [Katherine Fominykh, The Capital Gazette (Annapolis, Maryland), 12 Dec. 2019](https://www.capitalgazette.com/sports/high-school/ac-cs-nizaire-cromartie-navy-football-feature-20191212-fhncc4hf3vfwrhun25oyyv7wbm-story.html)

    Did you know?

    The "ambiguous" sense of homonymous refers mainly to words that have two or more meanings. Logicians and scientists who wanted to refer to (or complain about) such equivocal words chose a name for them based on Latin and Greek, from Greek hom- ("same") and onyma ("name"). In time, English speakers came up with another sense of homonymous referring to two things having the same name (Hawaii, the state, and Hawaii, the island, for example). Next came the use of homonymous to refer to [homonyms](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/homonym), such as see and sea. There's also a zoological sense. Sheep and goats whose right horn spirals to the right and left horn spirals to the left are said to be homonymous.

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    instigate

    instigate

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 25, 2020 is: instigate \IN-stuh-gayt\ verb
    : to [goad](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/goad) or urge forward : [provoke](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/provoke)

    Examples:

    "The big thing about effective advertising is that it uses data effectively to instigate behavior." — [Nicole Ortiz, Adweek, 14 Apr. 2020](https://www.adweek.com/programmatic/ben-lamm-what-students-want-to-know-most-about-ad-tech/)

    "In his usual genuine and silly fashion, [Chris] Martin sincerely explained his intent for making the live video and instigating a new series of live Instagram performances. 'What would be nice would be to check in with some of you out there and see how you're doing…. I had an idea that we could call this thing "Together At Home." And who knows, maybe tomorrow someone else will take it over,' he said." — [Sean Glaister, The Johns Hopkins (University) News-Letter, 6 Apr. 2020](https://www.jhunewsletter.com/article/2020/04/together-at-home-artists-and-celebrities-flock-to-social-media-to-deliver-entertainment)

    Did you know?

    Instigate is often used as a synonym of [incite](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/incite) (as in "hoodlums instigating violence"), but the two words differ slightly in their overall usage. Incite usually stresses an act of stirring something up that one did not necessarily initiate ("the court's decision incited riots"). Instigate implies responsibility for initiating or encouraging someone else's action and usually suggests dubious or underhanded intent ("he was charged with instigating a conspiracy"). Another similar word, [foment](https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/foment), implies causing something by means of persistent goading ("the leader's speeches fomented a rebellion"). Deriving from the past participle of the Latin verb instigare, instigate stepped into English in the 16th century, after incite and ahead of foment.

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カスタマーレビュー

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20件の評価

20件の評価

mond-kun

I like this!!

Every day, I can know and experience a new word, which is often completely unknown to me, so which makes me feel curious.
Thank you for making a good show every day!!

Monkafu

Can’t believe it’s Free

It’s all here ... pronunciation, etymology, example sentences of real professional writers, narration in a soothing voice ...

And it’s free?

I personally wouldn’t ask for more.

UCDavis1981

レベルの高い単語

個人的にはMerriam-Webster's Vocabulary Builder ペーパーバック版を毎日やっている。このポッドキャストに配信される単語は当然ながらVocabulary Builderには出てこないネイティヴでも相当タフな単語が一日1語出てくる。語源がフランス語だったり、相当レベルの高い単語が毎日配信される。International Phonetic Alphabet 国際発音記号ではないが、ネイティヴの発音が聞けるのであまり問題ではない。ただダウンロードする際に少し不具合(パソコン上にはダウンロードしてあるのにi-Pod-touchでは同期されなくてダウンロードを要求してくることが稀にある。多少の使い勝手の悪さはあるが、慣れてくればあまり気にならなくなる。一日1語の単語の数分間のリスニングでは不十分である。ノートか辞書ソフト単語帳に記録しておくことが必要かと思われる。一日1語のペースはレベルの高い単語なので私にはちょうど良い。

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