50エピソード

Rewilding Earth podcast is produced by The Rewilding Institute. Our guests range from activists to scientists to wildlands stewards and policy makers with whom we discuss wilderness recovery, species reintroduction, wildlands connectivity, and important work on the ground to restore wild nature to as much of the Earth as possible. Rewilding's mission is to develop and promote the ideas and strategies to advance continental-scale conservation in North America and beyond, particularly the need for large carnivores and a permeable landscape for their movement, and to offer a bold, scientifically-credible, practically achievable, and hopeful vision for the future of wild Nature and human civilization.

Rewilding Earth Podcas‪t‬ The Rewilding Institute

    • 非営利

Rewilding Earth podcast is produced by The Rewilding Institute. Our guests range from activists to scientists to wildlands stewards and policy makers with whom we discuss wilderness recovery, species reintroduction, wildlands connectivity, and important work on the ground to restore wild nature to as much of the Earth as possible. Rewilding's mission is to develop and promote the ideas and strategies to advance continental-scale conservation in North America and beyond, particularly the need for large carnivores and a permeable landscape for their movement, and to offer a bold, scientifically-credible, practically achievable, and hopeful vision for the future of wild Nature and human civilization.

    Episode 71: Population Stabilization And Biodiversity With Leon Kolankiewicz

    Episode 71: Population Stabilization And Biodiversity With Leon Kolankiewicz

    About

    Leon Kolankiewicz is scientific director of NumbersUSA and vice-president of Scientists and Environmentalists for Population Stabilization (SEPS).  He is also a consulting environmental scientist and natural resources planner. He has managed many Environmental Impact Statements (EIS’s) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) on proposed projects ranging from dams and reservoirs to flood control facilities, roads, parks, coal-fired power plants, wind farms, power lines, nuclear facilities, oil & gas drilling, and mines. Leon has assisted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the preparation of long-term management plans of habitat, wildlife populations, and public use at more than 40 national wildlife refuges in many states and territories. 

    Receiving his B.S. at Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA) and M.Sc. at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, B.C. Canada), during his career Leon has worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, National Marine Fisheries Service, Orange County (CA) Environmental Management Agency, University of Washington, University of New Mexico, the NGO Carrying Capacity Network, as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Honduras, and as an environmental consultant.  As a contractor, he has consulted for the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy, Army Corps of Engineers, NASA, and NOAA, among other federal agencies.  He is the author of two books and chapters in three other books, scores of technical environmental reports, a dozen studies on population growth and urban sprawl, and hundreds of articles and blog posts. 

    Among other writings, Leon co-authored “The Environmental Movement’s Retreat from Advocating U.S. Population Stabilization: A First Draft of History” in the scholarly Journal of Policy History, and wrote the chapter “Overpopulation versus Biodiversity: How a Plethora of People Produces a Paucity of Wildlife” in Life on the Brink: Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation (University of Georgia Press), an excerpt of which appeared alongside other classic and contemporary selections in the anthology Environment and Society: A Reader (New York University Press).   

    Leon is an avid naturalist, star-gazer, hiker, mountain climber, ocean kayaker, angler, and wilderness enthusiast.  

    Topics



    * Having productive, effective conversations about population stabilization

    * The culture and history of building large numbers for safety

    * The economics of endless growth and how it is destroying biodiversity



    Extra Credit



    * Reading: Overshoot: The Ecological Basis of Revolutionary Change and “Too Smart For Our Own Good“

    * Listen to other Rewilding Earth Podcast episodes on population stabilization

    * For you University of New Mexico Daily Lobo fans, check out Leon’s 1988 article “Overpopulation A Real Concern” Daily Lobo, Nov. 1988



     

    About

    Leon Kolankiewicz is scientific director of NumbersUSA and vice-president of a href="http://www.populationstabilization.

    • 31分
    Episode 70: Robert and Terri TallTree On Finding Balance For Conservationists Living In Challenging Times

    Episode 70: Robert and Terri TallTree On Finding Balance For Conservationists Living In Challenging Times

    Intro music: Native American Flute “Welcome Song” by Robert TallTree

    Outro Music: “Healing Song” by Robert TallTree

    About Robert and Terri TallTree

    Robert and Terri TallTree are spiritual leaders to a great many people around the world. Robert is a direct lineal descendent of Black Elk of the Swan Creek Black River Band of Chippewa Indians of Michigan. Multi-talented and boundlessly energetic, TallTree appears to have found his own balance through numerous outlets, not just as a professional speaker, but in the arts as well. An accomplished flautist, Robert was nominated for the prestigious Native American Music Awards. He is also an author, business owner, and former elected Chief of the Lone Feather Indian Council of Colorado Springs.

    Terri TallTree has used her skill in identifying and motivating human potential to create and develop innovative training programs in a wide variety of fields. She was presented a Humanitarian Award for outstanding contributions in developing programs for children with asthma. After 25 years in the corporate world, Terri now focuses on empowering people to live with purpose and vision in their professional and personal lives. A singer/songwriter and international recording artist, it’s been said “she has the voice of an angel”; “her voice is a gift which she uses with humility and grace.”

    Topics



    * River personhood – sentient being

    * The feather nation, the swimmers, the crawlers, we are all interdependent.

    * Staying grounded when you’re bombarded by tough issues and the daily modern grind

    * Creating peace in whatever space you’re provided – taking the forest with you

    * Music as prayer

    * Getting back to balance, lead with your heart, staying connected

    * An Ojibwe prayer for Earth



    Extra Credit

    Chief Robert TallTree’s “Healing Song”





    * Visit the TallTrees at their website “How To Live On Purpose“

    * New York Times article mentioned this episode: “They Want to Start Paying Mother Nature for All Her Hard Work“



     

    Intro music: Native American Flute “Welcome Song” by Robert TallTree

    Outro Music: “Healing Song” by Robert TallTree

    About Robert and Terri TallTree

    Robert and Terri TallTree are spiritual leaders to a great many people around the world. Robert is a direct lineal descendent of Black Elk of the Swan Creek Black River Band of Chippewa Indians of Michigan. Multi-talented and boundlessly energetic, TallTree appears to have found his own balance through numerous outlets, not just as a professional speaker, but in the arts as well. An accomplished flautist, Robert was nominated for the prestigious Native American Music Awards. He is also an author, business owner, and former elected Chief of the Lone Feather Indian Council of Colorado Springs.

    Terri TallTree has used her skill in identifying and motivating human potential to create and develop innovative training programs in a wide variety of fields. She was presented a Humanitarian Award for outstanding contributions in developing programs for children with asthma. After 25 years in the corporate world, Terri now focuses on empowering people to live with purpose and vision in their professional and personal lives. A singer/songwriter and international recording artist, it’s been said “she has the voice of an angel”; “her voice is a gift which she uses with humility and grace.”

    Topics



    * River personhood – sentient being

    * The feather nation, the swimmers, the crawlers, we are all interdependent.

    * Staying grounded when you’re bombarded by tough issues and the daily modern grindbr /...

    • 52分
    Episode 69: Keeping The Promise Of Wilderness With The Wilderness Land Trust

    Episode 69: Keeping The Promise Of Wilderness With The Wilderness Land Trust

    About

    Aimee joined the Trust in 2009 as the California Program Manager. Her experience includes serving as executive director of the Sacramento Valley Conservancy. Previously, she was a founder of Friends of the Sacramento River Greenway. She worked with the American Institute of Architects as Director of Governmental Relations, and served as legislative advocate for the California Bicycle Coalition. She holds a BA from Pomona College. Aimee is based in South Lake Tahoe, California.

    Topics



    * Putting wilderness back together

    * What happens when we love a place too much and how to fix

    * Abacho Canyon project

    * Mt Shasta Trail association and sisquiyou land trust

    * Restoring inholdings to wilderness quality

    * Flying cabins

    * Trail route restoration



    Extra Credit

    Visit & Support The Wilderness Land Trust

    Read: “Conserving Canyon Country” about New Mexico’s Organ Mountains Wilderness

    About

    Aimee joined the Trust in 2009 as the California Program Manager. Her experience includes serving as executive director of the Sacramento Valley Conservancy. Previously, she was a founder of Friends of the Sacramento River Greenway. She worked with the American Institute of Architects as Director of Governmental Relations, and served as legislative advocate for the California Bicycle Coalition. She holds a BA from Pomona College. Aimee is based in South Lake Tahoe, California.

    Topics



    * Putting wilderness back together

    * What happens when we love a place too much and how to fix

    * Abacho Canyon project

    * Mt Shasta Trail association and sisquiyou land trust

    * Restoring inholdings to wilderness quality

    * Flying cabins

    * Trail route restoration



    Extra Credit

    Visit & Support The Wilderness Land Trust

    Read: “Conserving Canyon Country” about New Mexico’s Organ Mountains Wilderness

    • 30分
    Episode 68: The Lowdown On Colorado Wolf Reintroduction With Gary Skiba

    Episode 68: The Lowdown On Colorado Wolf Reintroduction With Gary Skiba

    About Gary

    Gary joined SJCA in April 2020 and was a board member for several years prior to that. Gary worked for the Colorado Division of Wildlife for 23 years. Throughout his professional career, Gary focused on threatened and endangered species management and spearheaded the agency’s efforts on biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management.

    He has also worked for Great Old Broads for Wilderness and as an environmental consultant and monitoring conservation easements for La Plata Open Space Conservancy. Gary has a B.S. in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire and a M.S. in wildlife biology from Colorado State University. He enjoys a wide range of outdoor activities and lives near Aztec, NM with his wife, Kate Pickford, and three dogs.

    Topics



    * The importance of collaboration with landowners for a successful Colorado wolf reintroduction

    * How soon can Colorado wolf reintroduction proceed?

    * How much habitat is needed for a healthy wolf population in Colorado?

    * How will private landowners coexist with wolves?



    Extra Credit



    * Visit and Support San Juan Citizens Alliance

    * Gary Skiba’s wolf posts on the San Juan Citizens Alliance site

    YouTube video describing the impacts of wolves on the environment in Yellowstone: How wolves change rivers

    Visit: Yellowstone Wolves website



    Two Great Books



    Wolves by Mech/Boitani

    Yellowstone Wolves , book trailer





    About Gary

    Gary joined SJCA in April 2020 and was a board member for several years prior to that. Gary worked for the Colorado Division of Wildlife for 23 years. Throughout his professional career, Gary focused on threatened and endangered species management and spearheaded the agency’s efforts on biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management.

    He has also worked for Great Old Broads for Wilderness and as an environmental consultant and monitoring conservation easements for La Plata Open Space Conservancy. Gary has a B.S. in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire and a M.S. in wildlife biology from Colorado State University. He enjoys a wide range of outdoor activities and lives near Aztec, NM with his wife, Kate Pickford, and three dogs.

    Topics



    * The importance of collaboration with landowners for a successful Colorado wolf reintroduction

    * How soon can Colorado wolf reintroduction proceed?

    * How much habitat is needed for a healthy wolf population in Colorado?

    * How will private landowners coexist with wolves?



    Extra Credit



    * Visit and Support San Juan Citizens Alliance

    * Gary Skiba’s wolf posts on the San Juan Citizens Alliance site

    YouTube video describing the impacts of wolves on the environment in Yellowstone: How wolves change rivers

    Visit: Yellowstone Wolves website



    Two Great Books



    Wolves by Mech/Boitani

    Yellowstone Wolves , book trailer

    • 40分
    Episode 67: The Case For Removing 4 Dams On The Lower Snake River

    Episode 67: The Case For Removing 4 Dams On The Lower Snake River

    “For decades, eight lower Snake and Columbia river dams and reservoirs have hampered, harmed, killed, and rendered threatened and endangered four anadromous fish species. The lack of Snake River chinook salmon, a primary food source for the Salish Seas’ southern resident orcas, has concurrently brought these orcas to the brink of extinction.” ~Great Old Broads Don’t Dam Salmon page

    Today’s Guests

    Mickey is a co-chair of the board of the national conservation group Great Old Broads for Wilderness. Co-founder of the CV chapter (or “broadband” as we call them) of Great Old Broads, covers the region of NW Oregon and SW Washington. Mickey is a lawyer and in her career she focused on social justice work, representing people without housing and low income tenants in their housing and related legal needs.

    Amy worked for the past 40 years as a fish and wildlife biologist and spent 3 of those 4 decades with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Most of her work was as a fish biologist in central and eastern Oregon with experiences including fish habitat and population management and restoration, hydropower project relicensing and dam removals, and most recently as the Deschutes Basin manager.

    “I have been involved with opposition to the Four Lower Snake River Dams since the late 1960s. They were not a good idea even before their installation!” -Julie Weikel

    Forty five years as a large animal veterinarian, including academia, private practice, and regulatory medicine, gave Julie a big window on the American West. All those observations led inevitably to a realization that much of our natural world is in jeopardy and needs a more thoughtful and longer view.

    Maps

     





    Extra Credit

    Learn More About The Salmon Wars: The $34 Billion Dollar Plan To Breach The Lower Snake River Dams

    What if ? | Simpson on Salmon Recovery”





    * Great Old Broads Don’t Dam Salmon page

    * Watch: Dammed to Extinction movie

    * Niimipuu Protecting the Environment

    * Earth Justice





    Here is a short list of actions that you can take based on the Dammed to Extinction movie:



    * Letters to governors, congress and legislators

    * Letters to editors (LTEs) for local and regional newspapers.

    * Tell 5 people (and your family) what you have learned about salmon restoration. (Send them a link to this podcast page!)

    * Donate to non-profit groups that take action to restore rivers and promote dam breaching of the LSRD.

    * Join and participate in non-profit groups that advocate for dam removal of the LSRD.

    * Participate in activities by non profits such as the flotilla to restore salmon.





    “For decades, eight lower Snake and Columbia river dams and reservoirs have hampered, harmed, killed, and rendered threatened and endangered four anadromous fish species. The lack of Snake River chinook salmon, a primary food source for the Salish Seas’ southern resident orcas, has concurrently brought these orcas to the brink of extinction.” ~Great Old Broads Don’t Dam Salmon page

    Today’s Guests

    Mickey is a co-chair of the board of the national conservation group Great Old Broads for Wilderness. Co-founder of the CV chapter (or “broadband” as ...

    • 39分
    Episode 66: We Elected A President, Not A Fairy Godmother

    Episode 66: We Elected A President, Not A Fairy Godmother

    In this episode

    Rewilding’s Wildlands Coordinator Kim Crumbo clarifies how the conservation community must lean into the 30×30 campaign. He reminds us, while we have a friendly administration, we still have much work to do. And The Rewilding Institute is ready to provide the on-the-ground plan for protecting at least 30% land and water by 2030 for North America.

    Also:



    * The Wild Horses issue

    * Wolf recovery in Colorado



    About Kim Crumbo

    As The Rewilding Institute’s Wildlands Coordinator, Kim Crumbo leads our efforts to restore native carnivores to their rightful place on landscapes across the West. He works closely with diverse conservation partners and regional coalitions to engage scientists, communities, and elected leaders in the effort to secure species recovery and public support for wolves, bears, lynx, cougars, and other native carnivores.

    Kim served 20 years with the National Park Service in Grand Canyon, first as a river ranger and later as Wilderness Coordinator. He also worked as a river guide for a decade, and as Utah Wilderness Coordinator for the Sierra Club for 2 years. Beginning in 2000, Kim assumed various roles with the Grand Canyon Wildlands Council, including a stint as the northern representative for the Arizona Wilderness Coalition. Before working on rivers and in wilderness activism, he spent 4 years with the Navy’s SEAL Team One, completing two combat deployments in Vietnam.

    Extra Credit



    * Learn more about the Rewilding Institute’s efforts toward 30×30

    * Download a transcript of this episode. (PDF)



    In this episode

    Rewilding’s Wildlands Coordinator Kim Crumbo clarifies how the conservation community must lean into the 30×30 campaign. He reminds us, while we have a friendly administration, we still have much work to do. And The Rewilding Institute is ready to provide the on-the-ground plan for protecting at least 30% land and water by 2030 for North America.

    Also:



    * The Wild Horses issue

    * Wolf recovery in Colorado



    About Kim Crumbo

    As The Rewilding Institute’s Wildlands Coordinator, Kim Crumbo leads our efforts to restore native carnivores to their rightful place on landscapes across the West. He works closely with diverse conservation partners and regional coalitions to engage scientists, communities, and elected leaders in the effort to secure species recovery and public support for wolves, bears, lynx, cougars, and other native carnivores.

    Kim served 20 years with the National Park Service in Grand Canyon, first as a river ranger and later as Wilderness Coordinator. He also worked as a river guide for a decade, and as Utah Wilderness Coordinator for the Sierra Club for 2 years. Beginning in 2000, Kim assumed various roles with the Grand Canyon Wildlands Council, including a stint as the northern representative for the Arizona Wilderness Coalition. Before working on rivers and in wilderness activism, he spent 4 years with the Navy’s SEAL Team One, completing two combat deployments in Vietnam.

    Extra Credit



    * Learn more about the Rewilding Institute’s efforts toward 30×30

    * Download a transcript of this episode. (PDF)

    • 27分

非営利のトップPodcast

他のリスナーはこちらのサブスクリプションにも登録しています