80 episodes

Interview-style hematology/oncology podcast from MDedge Hematology-Oncology. The show is hosted by Dr. David Henry with Pearls from Dr. Ilana Yurkiewicz for clinical hematology and oncology health care professionals. The information in this podcast is provided for informational and educational purposes only.

Blood & Cancer MDedge Hematology & Oncology

    • Medicine
    • 5.0, 1 Rating

Interview-style hematology/oncology podcast from MDedge Hematology-Oncology. The show is hosted by Dr. David Henry with Pearls from Dr. Ilana Yurkiewicz for clinical hematology and oncology health care professionals. The information in this podcast is provided for informational and educational purposes only.

    Non small-cell lung cancer: How to choose the best therapy and reviewing the first virtual ASCO

    Non small-cell lung cancer: How to choose the best therapy and reviewing the first virtual ASCO

    Jack West, MD, joins the podcast to discuss how he chooses first-line treatment in new patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Dr. West is an associate clinical professor in medical oncology at City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in Duarte, Calif., and a thought leader in thoracic oncology. Dr. West also explores how the COVID-19 pandemic influences treatment approaches, the usefulness of liquid biopsy, and how he weighs the potentially higher risk for COVID-19 complications from checkpoint inhibitors.
     
    Check out Dr. West’s last two appearances on the podcast:
    https://www.mdedge.com/podcasts/blood-cancer/immunotherapy-lung-cancer-dr-jack-west-part-1 https://www.mdedge.com/podcasts/blood-cancer/immunotherapy-lung-cancer-dr-jack-west-part-2  
    Disclosures:
    Dr. Henry reported having no financial disclosures relevant to this episode.
    Dr. West has a full list of his financial disclosures here.
    *  *  *  
    For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgehemonc
    David Henry on Twitter: @davidhenrymd

    • 35 min
    Would you choose oncology again? Plus, breast cancer research: HER2CLIMB, KEYNOTE 522, and DESTINY BREAST01 with Dr. Bill Gradishar 

    Would you choose oncology again? Plus, breast cancer research: HER2CLIMB, KEYNOTE 522, and DESTINY BREAST01 with Dr. Bill Gradishar 

    David H. Henry, MD, answers the question, "Would you choose oncology again?" This question was asked of oncologists surveyed for the Medscape Oncologist Compensation Report 2020, and 96% of oncologists said they would still choose oncology as their specialty.
    Later, William J. Gradishar, MD, of Northwestern University in Chicago, joined Dr. Henry to discuss recent developments in breast cancer. Dr. Gradishar reviewed three trials presented at the 2019 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS), two of which will be updated at the ASCO Annual Meeting.
    *  *  *  
    SABCS highlights
    HER2CLIMB trial:
    This trial led to the recent U.S. approval of tucatinib in combination with trastuzumab and capecitabine. The phase 2 trial enrolled patients with heavily pretreated, HER2-positive, metastatic breast cancer (N Engl J Med. 2020 Feb 13; 382:597-609). Patients who received tucatinib plus trastuzumab and capecitabine had superior progression-free and overall survival, compared with patients who received placebo plus trastuzumab and capecitabine. Tucatinib even improved outcomes in patients with brain metastasis, Dr. Gradishar noted. Additional results from HER2CLIMB are scheduled to be presented at ASCO in Abstract 1005. DESTINY-BREAST01 trial:
    This trial led to the U.S. approval of trastuzumab deruxtecan. Trastuzumab deruxtecan produced durable responses and a median progression-free survival of 16.4 months in patients with HER2-positive, metastatic breast cancer who had previously received trastuzumab emtansine (N Engl J Med 2020; 382:610-621). A key side effect of trastuzumab deruxtecan is interstitial lung disease, which led to deaths in the trial and a black box warning for the antibody-drug conjugate. A subgroup analysis of data from DESTINY-BREAST01 is scheduled to be presented at ASCO in Abstract 1036. KEYNOTE-522 trial:
    The phase 3 trial enrolled patients with early triple-negative breast cancer (N Engl J Med 2020; 382:810-821). The rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) was significantly higher in patients who received pembrolizumab plus neoadjuvant chemotherapy than in patients who received placebo plus neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Although it is clear that pembrolizumab improves pCR, it isn’t clear if the checkpoint inhibitor will improve long-term outcomes, Dr. Gradishar said. Disclosures:
    Dr. Henry reported having no financial disclosures relevant to this episode.
    Dr. Gradishar reported financial relationships with AstraZeneca, Celltrion, Genentech, MacroGenics, Merck, Pfizer, and Seattle Genetics.
    *  *  *
    For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgehemonc
    David Henry on Twitter: @davidhenrymd
     
     

    • 27 min
    VTE rate, "COVID toes," and Virchow's triad: What you need to know about COVID and coagulation

    VTE rate, "COVID toes," and Virchow's triad: What you need to know about COVID and coagulation

    Adam C. Cuker, MD, joins host David H. Henry, MD, to discuss recent findings regarding coagulation in COVID-19 patients. Both Dr. Cuker and Dr. Henry both practice at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.
    Dr. Cuker cited data suggesting at least 25%-30% of patients with COVID-19 develop venous thromboembolism (VTE), despite receiving prophylactic anticoagulation. Furthermore, COVID-19 patients have presented with “lots of different thrombotic manifestations,” he said. This includes stroke and “COVID toes syndrome,” a condition in which patients present with ischemic toes, which appears to have a thromboembolic etiology.
    Dr. Cuker suggested that all three aspects of Virchow’s triad may be at play in patients with COVID-19 who have thrombotic manifestations, including:
    Circulatory stasis (in patients who are immobilized/sedated/prone/paralyzed). Hypercoagulability (inflammation, high levels of factor VIII and fibrinogen, neutrophil extracellular traps). Endothelial injury (SARS-CoV-2 may infect endothelial cells via ACE2). Dr. Cuker notes that high D-dimer correlates with disease severity and prognosis in COVID-19 patients. He also compares COVID-19 to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), noting that both are associated with venous and arterial thromboses. And, like HIT patients, those with COVID-19 may require therapeutic-intensity anticoagulation to prevent clots.
    Dr. Cuker says his hospital’s recommendations for anticoagulation in COVID-19 patients are as follows:
    Stable hospitalized patients should receive standard-intensity prophylaxis. ICU patients should receive intermediate- or therapeutic-intensity anticoagulation (at the discretion of the provider). On discharge, patients should receive low-dose rivaroxaban (Xarelto) at 10 mg daily for 30 days as prophylaxis. A nonhospitalized patient who has no risk factors for thrombotic events should not receive thromboprophylaxis. Dr. Cuker also discusses two recent publications on thrombosis and anticoagulation in COVID-19 patients. In one study, thrombotic events occurred in 31% of COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU at three Dutch hospitals (Thromb Res. 2020 Apr 10. pii: S0049-3848(20)30120-1).
    Another study suggested that systemic anticoagulation may improve outcomes of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2020 May 5. pii: S0735-1097(20)35218-9).
    Show notes by Emily Bryer, DO, resident in the department of internal medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
    Disclosures:
    Dr. Henry has no financial disclosures relevant to this episode.
    Dr. Cuker has served as a consultant for Synergy CRO. His institution has received research support on his behalf from Alexion, Bayer, Pfizer, Novo Nordisk, Sanofi, Spark, and Takeda.
    *  *  * 
    For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgehemonc
    David Henry on Twitter: @davidhenrymd
     
     
     

    • 32 min
    Curbsiders Host Dr. Matt Watto on being an internist in the COVID-19 pandemic

    Curbsiders Host Dr. Matt Watto on being an internist in the COVID-19 pandemic

    In this episode, Matthew Watto, MD, an internist at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, tells host David H. Henry, MD, also of Pennsylvania Hospital, how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected him personally and professionally.
    Dr. Watto recounts how COVID-19 has impacted patient volume, shifts, teaching, and interactions between patients and staff. Dr. Watto also discusses his internal medicine podcast, The Curbsiders, which, he says, provides listeners with “clinical pearls, practice-changing knowledge, and bad puns.”
    Disclosures:
    Dr. Henry has no financial disclosures relevant to this episode. Dr. Watto has no financial disclosures relevant to this episode.
    *  *  * 
    For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgehemonc
    David Henry on Twitter: @davidhenrymd
    Ilana Yurkiewicz on Twitter: @ilanayurkiewicz

    • 31 min
    Treating genitourinary malignancies in the COVID-19 era

    Treating genitourinary malignancies in the COVID-19 era

    How should oncologists be treating genitourinary malignancies during the COVID-19 pandemic? Aly-Khan A. Lalani, MD, of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and colleagues recently published recommendations that help answer that question (Can Urol Assoc J. 2020 May;14[5]:e154-8).
    In this episode, Dr. Lalani reviews some of these recommendations with podcast host David H. Henry, MD, of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. The pair discuss when and how to use androgen receptor axis-targeted therapies and radium-223 in metastatic prostate cancer, platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced urothelial carcinoma, and checkpoint inhibitors in patients with urothelial carcinoma or renal cell carcinoma.
    *  *  *  
    Disclosures:
    Dr. Henry reported having no financial disclosures relevant to this episode.
    Dr. Lalani has relationships with Astellas Pharma, Bayer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche/Genentech, TerSera, AbbVie, Eisai, Ipsen, and Janssen.
    *  *  *  
    For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgehemonc
    David Henry on Twitter: @davidhenrymd
    Ilana Yurkiewicz on Twitter: @ilanayurkiewicz

    • 34 min
    The first virtual ASCO meeting; plus Part 2 of tech tools for docs

    The first virtual ASCO meeting; plus Part 2 of tech tools for docs

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology is gearing up for its first-ever virtual meeting at the end of May 2020. ASCO’s president Howard A. “Skip” Burris, III, MD, joins David H. Henry, MD, of Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, to explain how the virtual meeting will work, from releasing research to earning continuing medical education credits. Dr. Burris also explores how the society is responding to COVID-19.
    Later in the podcast, Bernard A. Mason, MD, an oncologist with Pennsylvania Hospital and the University of Pennsylvania, both in Philadelphia, is back with some bonus technology tips for taking notes and syncing them across devices, sharing large files, and best practices for backing up files.
    Disclosures:
    Dr. Henry reported having no financial disclosures relevant to this episode.
    Dr. Burris has a full list of his financial disclosures here.
    Dr. Mason reported having no financial disclosures relevant to this episode.
    *  *  * 
    For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgehemonc
    David Henry on Twitter: @davidhenrymd
    Ilana Yurkiewicz on Twitter: @ilanayurkiewicz

    • 37 min

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