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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Hell for Tether: a cryptocurrency crimped

    Hell for Tether: a cryptocurrency crimped

    The notionally dollar-pegged “stablecoin” quietly underpins many crypto-market moves. We ask what the currency issuer’s clash with New York authorities means for the wider crypto craze. In many African countries, parliamentarians are asked to fill public-service gaps—at great personal cost. We examine moves toward a fairer forking out of funds. And why physical-education exams are popping up in China.
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    • 22 min
    Babbage: Collusions and collisions

    Babbage: Collusions and collisions

    After Facebook reached a deal with Australia, the tech giants are coming under fire once again -- this time from each other. Are their cosy monopolies under threat? Also, The Economist’s defence editor investigates the multi-billion dollar industry which exploits vulnerabilities in vital software. And, how whales could help the study of seismology in the ocean. Kenneth Cukier hosts 




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    • 26 min
    Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles

    Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles

    Planners are in a corner. Delaying or cancelling the summer tournament looks like defeat; pressing ahead looks like a danger. We take a look at the sporting chances. Britain has decarbonised faster than any other rich country, but getting to “net zero” will be a whole lot harder. And why South Koreans have such trouble with noisy neighbours.
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    • 21 min
    Money Talks: Pricing pollution

    Money Talks: Pricing pollution

    Could the success of the world’s biggest carbon market provide a model for the world? Plus, Cristina Junqueira, cofounder of Nubank, a Brazilian digital bank, on how the pandemic is supercharging the fintech revolution. And, why sports cards’ leap from the schoolyard to the stock exchange reveals the growing financial power of social networks. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.


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    • 26 min
    Confirmation biases: Biden’s cabinet picks

    Confirmation biases: Biden’s cabinet picks

    President Joe Biden’s top posts are shaping up as Senate confirmation hearings continue—but some controversial nominations await a vote. We look at who is on the docket. Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become messy, at the expense of some promised and much-needed reforms. And why the global rap scene is picking up a London accent. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 20 min
    The Jab: Are the vaccines effective enough?

    The Jab: Are the vaccines effective enough?

    Three vaccines have been approved by stringent regulators. Ten are being used in one or more countries. How do they work and are they effective enough against new variants of the coronavirus?


    Sarah Gilbert, inventor of the Oxford/Astrazeneca vaccine, tells us adapting to new variants should be easy. The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief David Rennie reports from China, which faces a huge test of its homegrown vaccine technology as it tries to re-open. James Fransham from our data team on how far the variants have spread.


    Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Slavea Chankova, The Economist's health-care correspondent, joins them.


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    • 36 min

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