6 episodes

The 2M Podcast is a conversation in which two journalists with a combined experience of 40 years in the media cut through the noise and interrogate the problems that many Kenyans do not want to talk about - but should. Our goal is to help Kenyans connect the dots, change their current reality, and re-imagine how they interact with State agencies and corporates. Our vision is to prompt a national conversation that goes beyond rhetoric and allows our audiences to make the kind of choices that will make Kenya more inclusive, more prosperous, and more just.

The 2M Podcast The 2M Podcast

    • News

The 2M Podcast is a conversation in which two journalists with a combined experience of 40 years in the media cut through the noise and interrogate the problems that many Kenyans do not want to talk about - but should. Our goal is to help Kenyans connect the dots, change their current reality, and re-imagine how they interact with State agencies and corporates. Our vision is to prompt a national conversation that goes beyond rhetoric and allows our audiences to make the kind of choices that will make Kenya more inclusive, more prosperous, and more just.

    Media Madness and the Kenyan Culture of Blame Game

    Media Madness and the Kenyan Culture of Blame Game

    This week, our conversation is on the Kenyan media, one of the institutions that certain Kenyans love to hate and blame for all the shortcomings in the country. Media Madness and the Kenyan Culture of Blame Game, we have called it because that is what it is. This group of Kenyans never see anything good coming from newsrooms, and always feel that the issues that should be covered are never covered. It is not untrue to say that the media have their shortcomings, but they deliver despite the tough conditions they operate in. Invariably, the media have been accused of being corrupt because of certain individual journalists. As a matter of fact, Kenyans, more so the online community, imply that media houses are full of idiots who do not know how to do their job, which in essence, most of the critics do not understand because they are not media-literate, so to write. Internally, media houses have several issues to deal with including sexism and sexual harassment, but at the end of the day, can Kenyan media be redeemed or it is a gone case?

    • 43 min
    Revolution and the culture of episodic outrage in Kenya

    Revolution and the culture of episodic outrage in Kenya

    This week we are talking about revolution. Whenever Kenyans feel that their voices are not being heard, or when they feel that there is an issue that needs to be addressed, — and this is quite often — the war cry becomes We Need a Revolution. Of what kind, is never said. A popular uprising or a violent spring starting with streets protests and such like? Well, that is not happening. While it is easy to conclude that the talk about a revolution is just that, talk, it can be said that the revolution is happening, quietly, through the concerted efforts of a group or groups of Kenyans whose utterances or actions are leading to the attainment of some of the changes that people need. How about the big revolutions that have been seen in other countries in Africa or Europe and the Americas? Can it happen, will it happen, can Kenyans make it happen? Are there Kenyans who are ready to sacrifice, their time or anything else for the revolution to happen...? Listen in.

    • 37 min
    All the President's Names: Examining Kenya's Fat Shaming Culture

    All the President's Names: Examining Kenya's Fat Shaming Culture

    This week we’re talking about bodies, fat and shaming. A few days ago, the notorious #KOT took aim at Kenyan president, Uhuru Kenyatta, making fun of him for gaining a few pounds. This came after images of the president on an official visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo started making rounds on social media. In the images, it was evident that Uhuru has packed on a few kilos. He looked rounder than his usual self, and for that fact alone, he became the subject of a plethora of mean memes and cruel comments. Some went so far as to accuse him of “adding weight” because he had been “eating our taxes”. All the attacks were targeted at the personhood of the president, with a very tenuous link being drawn between Uhuru the man and Uhuru the policymaker. But it is one thing to criticise a president for poor governance and quite another to critique him on his personal appearance. Listen is as we take the long view of the various arguments for and against.

    • 31 min
    Tabloid Radio and Rape Culture Part 2

    Tabloid Radio and Rape Culture Part 2

    In this week's episode, we're having our final conversation on tabloid radio and rape culture in Kenya. Last week we spoke about the boundaries that radio presenters cross in their quest to attract and keep listeners. We were reacting to the comments made by Shaffie Weru and his co-hosts on HomeBoyz Radio. The three men made disrespectful comments about a young lady who was pushed off the 12th floor of a building by a man because she refused to have sex with him. Their comments caused a public outcry. Last week we discussed how we came to a place where media personalities feel emboldened to make comments that make light of sexual violence. And this week, our focus is regulation. We spoke with Mr Victor Bwire, who is the Deputy CEO of the Media Council of Kenya, and he explained how media regulators engage with journalists and media workers.

    • 36 min
    Tabloid Radio and Rape Culture in Kenya

    Tabloid Radio and Rape Culture in Kenya

    If there is any kind of talk that excites radio listeners in Kenya, it is about relationships, and that means sex. While that kind of talk shores up ratings for the shows’ hosts and the respective stations, it also rubs people the wrong way, especially when the hosts get carried away as they always do. In this episode, we discuss how, what we call tabloid radio, perpetuates rape culture in Kenya. 

    • 25 min
    2M Podcast Trailer

    2M Podcast Trailer

    If there is any kind of talk that excites radio listeners in Kenya, it is about relationships, and that means sex. While that kind of talk shores up ratings for the shows’ hosts and the respective stations, it also rubs people the wrong way, especially when the hosts get carried away as they always do. In this episode, we discuss how, what we call tabloid radio, perpetuates rape culture in Kenya.

    • 1 min

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