25 episodes

Race is a topic many of us struggle to talk about at work, yet it shapes so many of our career experiences and outcomes. But host Porter Braswell (Jopwell) is on a mission to create a safe space to share those stories – and learn from them. Hear leaders from business and government trace their personal journeys with race, equity, and inclusion. And learn from their mistakes and their triumphs.

The views expressed on this podcast are those of its hosts, guests, and callers, and not those of Harvard Business Review.

Race at Work with Porter Braswell Harvard Business Review

    • Business

Race is a topic many of us struggle to talk about at work, yet it shapes so many of our career experiences and outcomes. But host Porter Braswell (Jopwell) is on a mission to create a safe space to share those stories – and learn from them. Hear leaders from business and government trace their personal journeys with race, equity, and inclusion. And learn from their mistakes and their triumphs.

The views expressed on this podcast are those of its hosts, guests, and callers, and not those of Harvard Business Review.

    UCLA Law’s Laura E. Gómez: Understanding Critical Race Theory, Part 2

    UCLA Law’s Laura E. Gómez: Understanding Critical Race Theory, Part 2

    This is the second part of a two-part series exploring critical race theory (CRT) and its influence on diversity and inclusion efforts in workplaces and classrooms.

    Laura E. Gómez, a law professor at UCLA, teaches in the school’s Critical Race Studies Program, which uses CRT to explore how legal and other systems intersect with race in the U.S. In the final episode of Season 2, she tells host Porter Braswell that racism isn’t about individual prejudice, but rather about the messages our larger society gives us about our identities.

    • 33 min
    The Guardian’s Julia Carrie Wong: Understanding Critical Race Theory, Part 1

    The Guardian’s Julia Carrie Wong: Understanding Critical Race Theory, Part 1

    This is part one of a two-part series exploring critical race theory (CRT) and its influence on diversity and inclusion efforts in workplaces and classrooms.

    Julia Carrie Wong is a senior reporter for The Guardian, and she’s been covering the ongoing debate around CRT in schools and federal employee trainings. CRT is an academic discipline that teaches that racism is deeply embedded into U.S. legal and political systems. Wong talks with host Porter Braswell about what CRT is, efforts to ban CRT from classrooms, and why some institutions are resistant to making CRT a standard educational tool.

    • 24 min
    Former McDonald’s CEO Don Thompson and Cleveland Avenue Foundation’s Liz Thompson: Breaking Barriers

    Former McDonald’s CEO Don Thompson and Cleveland Avenue Foundation’s Liz Thompson: Breaking Barriers

    Don and Liz Thompson are leaders in their respective industries. Don had a long career rising through the ranks of McDonald’s, eventually becoming the company’s first Black CEO. Meanwhile his wife Liz Thompson was a rising executive in education and nonprofits – like City Year Chicago, where she was the founding executive director.

    Throughout their careers, the Thompsons kept their community in mind. In 2014, they started the Cleveland Avenue Foundation for Education (The CAFE), an organization focused on college access and career attainment for the Black community. They talk to host Porter Braswell about being intentional with their work, in order to build economic equity in the Black community whenever they had the opportunity. They also discuss breaking racial barriers while climbing to the top of corporate America.

    • 36 min
    McKinsey Institute’s Shelley Stewart: Black Americans and Economic Mobility

    McKinsey Institute’s Shelley Stewart: Black Americans and Economic Mobility

    Shelley Stewart III, leader of the McKinsey Institute for Black Economic Mobility, discusses a new report that examines the gaps and barriers Black Americans face in the U.S. economy. Stewart and host Porter Braswell review the report’s findings and explore how addressing representational imbalances could create greater economic equity.

    • 30 min
    AT&T’s Anne Chow: Creating a Safe Workplace

    AT&T’s Anne Chow: Creating a Safe Workplace

    Anne Chow is the first woman of color to be the CEO in AT&T’s history. As a business leader and the daughter of Taiwanese immigrants, she’s made it a point to have conversations about race and ethnicity in the workplace throughout her 30-year career at the company. Chow is the co-author of a book about unconscious bias in the workplace, and she tells host Porter Braswell how business leaders can create safe spaces for employees of color.

    • 32 min
    High on the Hog’s Stephen Satterfield: The Power of Black Storytelling

    High on the Hog’s Stephen Satterfield: The Power of Black Storytelling

    As host of a hit new Netflix TV show, “High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America,” and founder of a food media company, Stephen Satterfield has a platform to share Black narratives. He tells host Porter Braswell how powerful it is to share these stories, and why it’s important for them to be told through the lens of an all-Black production crew.

    • 40 min

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