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The Glossy Beauty Podcast is the newest podcast from Glossy.
Each 30-minute episode features candid conversations about how today’s trends, such as CBD and self-care, are shaping the future of the beauty and wellness industries. With a unique assortment of guests, The Glossy Beauty Podcast provides its listeners with a variety of insights and approaches to these categories, which are experiencing explosive growth. From new retail strategies on beauty floors, to the importance of filtering skincare products through crystals, this show sets out to help listeners understand everything that is going on today, and prepare for what will show up in their feeds tomorrow.

The Glossy Beauty Podcast Glossy

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The Glossy Beauty Podcast is the newest podcast from Glossy.
Each 30-minute episode features candid conversations about how today’s trends, such as CBD and self-care, are shaping the future of the beauty and wellness industries. With a unique assortment of guests, The Glossy Beauty Podcast provides its listeners with a variety of insights and approaches to these categories, which are experiencing explosive growth. From new retail strategies on beauty floors, to the importance of filtering skincare products through crystals, this show sets out to help listeners understand everything that is going on today, and prepare for what will show up in their feeds tomorrow.

    "Browse commerce is just done': Stella & Dot founder and CEO Jessica Herrin

    "Browse commerce is just done': Stella & Dot founder and CEO Jessica Herrin

    Millions of Americans are still out of work as the coronavirus pandemic's ripples through the economy, and many are unlikely to return to the jobs they held a few months ago.
    A few companies -- including Stella & Dot, Ever and Keep -- have stepped into that vacuum, offering gig economy work for people willing and able to sell cosmetics, clothes and fashion accessories.
    "We really started growing when unemployment was at 8 and 9%. And in some ways you could say the growth of our business was somewhat counter-cyclical, because when people had a greater financial need, not only did you see more people join, but you saw the people that did join work more and earn more," Stella & Dot founder and CEO Jessica Herrin said on the Glossy Podcast of the 2008 final crisis.
    The company counts about 30,000 "ambassadors," though the number of people actively selling on a monthly basis is between 8,000 and 10,000, according to Herrin.
    Prior to Covid-19, Stella & Dot, Ever and Keep went through a $50 million tech revamp to connect sellers with a digital platform (inspired by Shopify, Pinterest and Polyvore) allowing them to set up a curated selection of products -- a storefront, essentially -- which they can then email or text to customers.
    That foresight has been key to surviving as a business during coronavirus.
    "Browse commerce is just done," Herrin said. "Who wants to go to a website and search and come up with a thousand options and look for reviews that may or not be real, rather than get a curated assortment texted to you with personalized recommendations?"

    • 38분
    Starring's Ted Gibson and Jason Backe on redefining what a salon looks like

    Starring's Ted Gibson and Jason Backe on redefining what a salon looks like

    Ted Gibson and Jason Backe had to close one business to make another work.
    The married couple (a hairstylist and colorist, respectively) and business partners say it took closing down their flagship salon location on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 2017 to allow them to rethink their futures. What they landed on was a L.A. smart salon "powered by Amazon," that had no receptionist and no inventory -- their hero product, the Shooting Star Texture Meringue, was not sold in store, but on Amazon.
    "We knew that that model of 25 chairs, 12 assistants, a huge front desk staff, the overhead of the product -- we knew that that model was a dinosaur," Backe said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast.
    In the latest Glossy Beauty podcast, Gibson and Backe talk about bouncing back from having just $2,500 in the bank because of Covid-19, how some beauty companies are all talk when it comes to supporting Black businesses and what the salon of the future looks like.

    • 54분
    'Diversity is good for business, period': Uoma Beauty founder Sharon Chuter

    'Diversity is good for business, period': Uoma Beauty founder Sharon Chuter

    Uoma Beauty founder Sharon Chuter is more than ready for the reckoning coming to monocultural corporations in America.
    "Now I can be more vocal about it because I have little to lose," Chuter said on this week's episode of the Glossy Beauty Podcast. "I didn't start my business to be a billionaire. It was part of me using a platform to speak up against what was going on."
    The Nigerian-born founder launched the #PullUpForChange campaign earlier this month, calling for the brands that had come out in support of Black Lives Matter to disclose the number of Black employees on their own payrolls, including those at the corporate and executive level.
    "You're not giving them jobs," Chuter said about the brands. "You take their culture, you repackage it and you sell it back to them at a premium. Meanwhile, you're not employing them."
    Some beauty companies divulged these statistics, alongside promises to improve, but for Chuter, "pulling up" also means being held accountable for that down the line -- every six months, specifically.
    "In six months, some people won't have made much progress. That's reality. Especially right now in the Covid-19 era," she said. "So we want to establish two national days where all national companies pull up for the Black community and let us see."
    The Black population makes up 13.4% of the country as a whole, but Black employees only account for 8.6% of Fortune 500 board seats and 3.2% of senior managers, according to data reported in The Economist. According to McKinsey & Company, only 1% of Black business owners get a bank loan in their first year of business, compared with 7% of white business owners. And The Washington Post found that only 1% of founders who have raised venture capital are Black; in 2018, 81% of VC firms didn’t have a single Black investor.
    Chuter is ultimately optimistic. "I have to be," she said. By way of solutions, she urged companies to develop executive talent from within a company's ranks while putting out calls for employment at historically Black colleges and universities; to front ad campaigns and messaging with Black models and organizers even at the cost of alienating certain consumers (or investors) who don't understand the moral urgency; and creating diversity boards that exist outside a company's own workforce.
    "Unless they're independent, they do not have power to implement change because they answer to you, so they're going to give you the answers that you want to hear," Chuter said. "And that's something that every big company should be thinking of right now."

    • 48분
    Mented Cosmetics' KJ Miller and Amanda Johnson on the reasons to bet on diverse brands

    Mented Cosmetics' KJ Miller and Amanda Johnson on the reasons to bet on diverse brands

    Beauty companies that fail to bring diverse employees into their teams, for executive-level to entry-level roles, aren't just at risk of failing on a moral front -- they're also leaving money on the table, according to Mented co-founders KJ Miller and Amanda Johnson.
    "Money talks. So maybe you don't understand why it's important that I have a lipstick that works for my skin tone, but you can understand that black women outspend their non-black counterparts by 80%," Miller said on this week's episode of the Glossy Beauty Podcast. "The smart investors got it and they are now investors in a really successful brand, and the other investors didn't. And that's on them"
    Miller and Johnson graduated from the same 2014 class at Harvard Business School, and launched Mented in January 2017. Sales grew by roughly 400% in the following year, during which -- after pitching 80 VCs -- they raised a pre-seed investment of $1 million. In 2018, the company raised $3 million in further funding.
    In Johnson's view, "Diversity in beauty has always been 'a trend.' Sometimes it's really up, sometimes it's really down. It depends on what models are on the runway, what's chic in a season," she said. "But the reality is people of color have always been around."
    Regarding the killing of George Floyd and the protests that continue to sweep the country, Johnson acknowledged the gravity of the climate, especially as black founders and leaders.
    "We’re making it," she said. "The thing that continues to brighten the day and push us forward is obviously, our families and our passion for the thing we’re building, but also our customers. We have had some of the most heartfelt emails and social comments over the last couple of months and weeks, whether it was about Covid[-19] or about social injustice, encouraging us to keep going, to keep fighting, that our company matters, that what we're doing is important. Sometimes just that one message is the thing that can keep you going in what is an incredibly difficult day."

    • 43분
    'I definitely don't think we're looking at the death of retail': Unilever Prestige Group CEO and EVP Vasiliki Petrou

    'I definitely don't think we're looking at the death of retail': Unilever Prestige Group CEO and EVP Vasiliki Petrou

    The coronavirus pandemic has created more uncertainty for brick-and-mortar locations, but it's an opportunity for companies to ramp up the expertise and service stores were known for digitally.
    "That is not going away," Unilever Prestige Group CEO and EVP Vasiliki Petrou said in regard to virtual consultations and other digital innovations. "It just will grow stronger. Being future fit is definitely taking that muscle to the next stage," she said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast of the group's brands such as Tatcha and Murad.
    And while that aspect of a brand's presence demands evolution, Petrou thinks that conversely, consumers these days are especially attracted to hero products from the brands they know and love.
    "In crisis people tend to go back to the bigger, credible, iconic products versus, let's say, the more 'discovery' ones," Petrou said. "Consumers want to go to a safe haven."
    Petrou wouldn't confirm or deny rumors that Unilever Prestige was in talks to acquire British makeup brand Charlotte Tilbury, only teasing that "some [rumors] are true, some are not." But she did explain the company's overall approach to M&A.
    "We're always about founder-led brands. We're always looking at new business models, new approaches, whether there's a big idea that's globally relevant, and definitely looking at all categories," Petrou said.

    • 38분
    Murad CEO Michelle Shigemasa on reaching 50% DTC 'in the next two years, max'

    Murad CEO Michelle Shigemasa on reaching 50% DTC 'in the next two years, max'

    When Murad CEO Michelle Shigemasa turned the skin care company's focus to direct-to-consumer sales versus wholesale last year, it was with the goal of getting to 50% DTC within five years.
    Now Shigemasa estimates a much faster timeline. "I think that'll happen in the next two years, max," Shigemasa said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast.
    "We've seen digital sales that frankly surprised us. We knew that they would accelerate, but to this degree, I don't think we understood," she said. Sales on Amazon and Murad's own website have also at last doubled, Shigemasa added.
    Like just about every company in the industry, the Unilever-owned brand is aiming to take as much customer engagement as it can online with the onset of Covid-19. Shigemasa called virtual events "One of the big challenges we have on our list that we're working on."
    Virtual "skin check-ins," an effort that involved shifting personnel from frozen brick-and-mortar outlets -- including Sephora, Ulta, Macy’s and Nordstrom -- have led to 300-400 appointments a day, she said
    Considering the uncertainty caused by the pandemic, Shigemasa sees no reason to look back. "When we look forward at brick-and-mortar, I'm not sure they'll ever be the same, to be frank."

    • 34분

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