23 episodes

Smuggled dinosaur bones. Man-made glaciers. An audacious quest to find the world's southernmost tree. Each week, we'll dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations we've overheard around National Geographic's headquarters. You'll be introduced to the explorers, photographers and scientists at the edges of our big, bizarre, and beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

Overheard at National Geographic National Geographic

    • Natural Sciences

Smuggled dinosaur bones. Man-made glaciers. An audacious quest to find the world's southernmost tree. Each week, we'll dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations we've overheard around National Geographic's headquarters. You'll be introduced to the explorers, photographers and scientists at the edges of our big, bizarre, and beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

    The United States v. One Tyrannosaurus Bataar

    The United States v. One Tyrannosaurus Bataar

    When a Mongolian paleontologist sees a dinosaur skeleton illegally up for auction in the United States, she goes to great lengths to stop the sale. For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard

    Want more?
    Read about the latest discoveries in paleontology, such as the T.Rex's survival strategy for when food was scarce.
    Find out about the entrepreneur from Florida who went to jail for smuggling Mongolian fossils.
    Learn about the two leading theories for why dinosaurs went extinct in the first place.

    Also explore:
    Watch the final return of the fossil that was auctioned off in New York to Bolor Minjin and other representatives of the Mongolian government.
    Bolor once took a Winnebago filled with dinosaur exhibits off-road, across the Gobi. Read more about how she's helping to educate Mongolians about paleontology at The Institute for the Study of Mongolian Dinosaurs.

    And for paid subscribers:
    Take a look behind the scenes at the private collectors who are buying dinosaur bones.
    Bones are the most common type of dinosaur fossil, but in the right conditions, scales and even skin can be preserved. See pictures of a petrified nodosaur on our website.

    Got something to say?
    Contact us: overheard@natgeo.com

    • 22 min
    The Unstoppable Wily Coyote

    The Unstoppable Wily Coyote

    They're smart, they're sneaky, and they aren't moving out any time soon. Meet your new neighbor, the coyote, and find out why these cunning canids are on the rise in North America-and beyond. For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/podcasts/overheard.

    Want more?
    Read more of Christine Dell'Amore's reporting about coyotes' remarkable spread.
    See Chicago through a coyote's eyes with video from a Nat Geo Crittercam.
    It's not just coyotes: other animals are finding homes in cities. Dive into Nat Geo stories about urban wildlife.
    Learn about the U.S. government program that killed millions of coyotes in "the most epic campaign of persecution against any animal in North American history."

    Also explore:
    Meet the National Geographic Explorer trying to save jaguars, a key coyote predator in Central America.
    Be prepared: here are tips to avoid coyote conflict and a guide to Hazing 101.
    Check out Roland Kays' podcast, Wild Animals, for more fun animal stories.

    Got something to say?
    Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

    • 23 min
    The Towers of Ladakh

    The Towers of Ladakh

    A mechanical engineer teams up with an unlikely band of students who use middle school math and science to create artificial glaciers that irrigate Ladakh, a region in India hit hard by climate change. For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/podcasts/overheard.

    Want More?
    Read Arati's story about Sonam Wangchuk and his artificial glaciers in this month's issue of the magazine.
    It's not just Ladakh that's facing a water crisis. Learn more about India's struggles with water infrastructure, with more reporting by Arati Kumar-Rao.
    You can read about the complicated history of Kashmir, an area that's witnessed two wars and a longstanding insurgency.

    Also explore:
    Check out photos of Sonam's solar-powered school built from mud.
    You can also make your own pledge to live simply by visiting the I Live Simply movement's website.

    Got something to say?
    Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

    • 20 min
    Overheard Season 3

    Overheard Season 3

    Smuggled dinosaur bones. Man-made glaciers. An audacious quest to find the world's southernmost tree. Each week, we'll dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations we've overheard around National Geographic's headquarters. You'll be introduced to the explorers, photographers and scientists at the edges of our big, bizarre, and beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

    • 1 min
    The Virus Hunter

    The Virus Hunter

    Coronaviruses aren't new. For more than 20 years, German virologist Rolf Hilgenfeld has been looking for ways to slow or stop the virus. What does it take to find a treatment for coronaviruses, and what might that mean for the future of COVID-19? For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard

    Want more?
    Rolf Hilgenfeld is one of the many people who are trying to test and develop medicine for COVID-19. Nat Geo reporter Michael Greshko has put together an article explaining the other approaches out there.
    On our Coronavirus Coverage page you can find National Geographic's most up-to-date articles on the pandemic, including news and explanations of the science.
    On that page, other articles provide new perspectives, such as how astronauts handle social isolation, and what people used to do before toilet paper was invented.
    And if you've had too much news about the pandemic, Nat Geo has put together a new newsletter called Escape, full of awe-inspiring pictures, compelling stories, and no COVID-19 updates whatsoever.

    Also explore:
    If you'd like to dive deeper into the antiviral compound Rolf Hilgenfeld has been developing, check out the research paper.
    The CDC website is the best source for new information about COVID-19 and how you can stay safe and keep others around you safe.

    Got something to say? Contact us:
    overheard@natgeo.com

    • 18 min
    The Frozen Zoo

    The Frozen Zoo

    Right now, one million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction. Conservation scientists are doing whatever they can to save them, or at least of piece of them. For the last 45 years, a team of researchers at the San Diego Zoo has been freezing the cells of endangered animals. With these time capsules of DNA, researchers continue to study endangered animals, and hope to maybe even bring some back from the brink of extinction. For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard

    Want more?
    National Geographic photographer Ami Vitale has covered conflict and nature. She was with Sudan when he died and she believes that the survival of creatures like the northern white rhino is intertwined with our own.
    Move over, Noah. Joel Sartore is building his own ark - out of photographs. He's on a decades-long mission to take portraits of more than 15,000 endangered species before it's too late.
    Stuart Pimm has a lot more to say about species revival. In this editorial he makes a case against de-extinction - and explains why bringing back extinct creatures could do more harm than good.
    It's been a long time since Jurassic Park hit theaters. Today, our revival technology straddles the line between science fact and science fiction - but do we want to go there?

    Also explore:
    Read Kate Gammon's original reporting for InsideScience, which inspired this conversation here at Overheard HQ.
    Want to dive further into the debate? Hear George Church's talk - and talks by some of the greatest minds in conservation - at the TedxDeExtinction conference.
    The Frozen Zoo is working on a lot of exciting research that didn't make it into the episode. For example, they've already managed to turn rhino skin cells into beating heart cells. To learn more about what they're up to, check out the San Diego Zoo's Institute for Conservation Research for yourself.
    Some of the most promising applications for the Frozen Zoo come from new technology that lets us turn one kind of cell into any other kind of cell. Read more about the first mouse that was created from skin cells.

    Got something to say?
    Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com
    Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

    • 26 min

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