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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    Protesting Her Own Employer

    Protesting Her Own Employer

    “As a Black woman who works at Adidas my experiences have never been business as usual.”

    Julia Bond, an assistant apparel designer at the sportswear giant, says she had resigned herself to experiencing and witnessing racism at work — until she saw the George Floyd video.

    Today, we speak to Ms. Bond, an assistant apparel designer at Adidas, who has brought the global racial reckoning to the company’s front door.

    Wanting more than just schemes and targets, she has been protesting in front of the company’s Portland headquarters every day since June, awaiting an apology from leadership and an admission that they have enabled racism and discrimination. Guest: Julia Bond, assistant apparel designer at Adidas, who has been protesting outside the company’s Portland headquarters for the last three months. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Adidas has made a number of pledges to diversify its work force. However, Black employees want more: an admission that the company’s leadership has enabled racism and an apology.  From Facebook’s pledge to double the number of Black and Latinx by 2023 to YouTube creating a $100 million fund for Black creators, organizations across the U.S. have committed to redressing racial imbalance. 

    • 42 min
    Why Teachers Aren’t Ready to Reopen Schools

    Why Teachers Aren’t Ready to Reopen Schools

    With the possibility that millions or tens of millions of American children will not enter a classroom for an entire year, school districts face an agonizing choice: Do the benefits of in-person learning outweigh the risks it poses to public health in a pandemic? Today, we explore how teachers and their unions are responding to demands from some parents, and the president, to reopen their schools this fall. Guest: Dana Goldstein, a national correspondent for The New York Times, who covers the impact of education policies on families, students and teachers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: With almost 1,200 staff and students now quarantined, the reopening of Atlanta’s Cherokee County School District could presage a difficult back-to-school season.Many teachers are anxious and angry: They say crucial questions about how schools will stay clean, keep students physically distanced and prevent further spread of the virus have not been answered.Our illustrator imagined what going back to school might look like this fall.

    • 26 min
    A Historic V.P. Decision

    A Historic V.P. Decision

    Joseph R. Biden Jr. picked Senator Kamala Harris of California as his running mate, making her the first Black woman and the first Asian American woman to run for vice president on a major party ticket. Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times, shares his thoughts on the decision. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Joe Biden selected Kamala Harris as his vice-presidential running mate on Tuesday. She will be the first is the first Black woman and the first person of Indian descent to be nominated for the office by a major party.The selection of Ms. Harris was conventional by some political standards, and groundbreaking in others. Democrats hope that having her on the ticket will attract moderates and Black voters in swing states.Here’s what you should know about the California senator and her stances on key policy issues. 

    • 27 min
    Cancel Culture, Part 2: A Case Study

    Cancel Culture, Part 2: A Case Study

    Yesterday on “The Daily,” the New York Times reporter Jonah Bromwich explained how the idea of cancel culture has emerged as a political and cultural force in 2020. In the second of two parts, he returns with a case study. 

    Guest: Jonah Engel Bromwich, who writes for the Styles section of The New York Times, spoke with Zeeshan Aleem about his experience of cancel culture. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Here’s the first episode in this two-part series exploring cancel culture’s origins and political power.There’s an emerging class of people canceled for bad, conservative or offensive opinions. Cancellation is bringing many of them together.For teenagers, cancellation on social media is not a new phenomenon. Here are some of their own experiences with being canceled.

    • 32 min
    Cancel Culture, Part 1: Where It Came From

    Cancel Culture, Part 1: Where It Came From

    In the first of two parts, the New York Times reporter Jonah Bromwich explains the origins of cancel culture and why it’s a 2020 election story worth paying attention to. 

    Guest: Jonah Engel Bromwich, who writes for the Styles section of The New York Times

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: What does it mean to be canceled? It can take only one thing — and sometimes, nothing — for fans to dump a celebrity.Many figures in the public eye — including Kanye West and J.K. Rowling — have fretted about being, or claimed to have been, canceled. When an open letter published by Harper’s and signed by 153 prominent artists warned against an “intolerant climate” engulfing the culture, the reaction was swift.The prevalence of “call-out culture” is something former President Barack Obama has challenged. 

    • 34 min
    The Sunday Read: 'A Speck in the Sea'

    The Sunday Read: 'A Speck in the Sea'

    John Aldridge fell overboard in the middle of the night, 40 miles from shore, and the Coast Guard was looking in the wrong place. This is a story about isolation — and our struggle to close the space between us.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    This is the article read in this episode, written by Paul Tough.

    • 48 min

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