300 episodes

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Intelligence The Economist

    • Daily News
    • 4.5, 2 Ratings

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

    Therein Lai’s a tale: Hong Kong’s revealing arrests

    Therein Lai’s a tale: Hong Kong’s revealing arrests

    The dramatic arrest of Jimmy Lai, a pro-democracy newspaper owner, reveals just how enthusiastically Beijing’s new security law will be deployed to quash any dissent. A reservoir is filling behind an enormous new dam in Ethiopia—and that has soured relations with Egypt downriver. And why Britain’s “urban explorers” may soon have far fewer derelict buildings to conquer.
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    • 22 min
    Buy now, save later: financing vaccine candidates

    Buy now, save later: financing vaccine candidates

    As clinical trials progress, policymakers must determine how heavily to fund the pre-emptive manufacture of candidate vaccines, and how to distribute the successful ones. Given Britain’s bungled pandemic response, the separatist mood in Scotland has surged to record levels. And travel tips from the vloggers of illegal migration.
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    • 22 min
    Bytes and pieces: America’s Chinese-tech attack

    Bytes and pieces: America’s Chinese-tech attack

    First it was Bytedance’s app TikTok, now it’s Tencent’s WeChat: the Trump administration’s fervour to ban or dismantle wildly popular Chinese apps is increasing. In these straitened times, employees naturally worry that robots and software are coming for jobs—but the pandemic may actually slow that transition. And Britain’s government suggests slimming down even as it subsidises meals out.
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    • 21 min
    That history should not repeat: Hiroshima’s storytellers

    That history should not repeat: Hiroshima’s storytellers

    Survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings are now in their eighties. A new generation is learning to tell their tales, in hopes of preventing more atomic tragedies. Belarus’s president of 26 years will probably win in Sunday’s election, but an invigorated—and unexpected—opposition has him on the back foot. And the horror movie that will make you nervous to use Zoom. 
    Additional archive courtesy of Soka Gakkai Women’s Peace Committee. Additional sounds by InspectorJ at Freesound.org. 
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    • 22 min
    A broken system, a broken city: Beirut

    A broken system, a broken city: Beirut

    Some 300,000 people are homeless after an explosion of unthinkable size. The culprit appears to be sheer negligence, brought on by a broken system of governance. The Economist’s data team has updated its excess-death tracker, giving ever-better insight into just how deadly covid-19 is. And the tricky trade-offs for both bosses and workers as they return to the office. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 22 min
    One nation, under gods? India’s divisive temple

    One nation, under gods? India’s divisive temple

    Consecration at Ayodhya, the country’s most contested holy site, is another tick box in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu-nationalist agenda. Is India’s foundational secularism at risk? The pandemic has been particularly cruel for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s; we examine new research that gives them a ray of hope. And the massive, wheel-terms growth in e-bike sales. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

DinaraAstana ,

Please add more diversity among expert speakers

I listen to Economist Intelligence podcast almost everyday. I am really enjoying it in the mornings and I would like to thank you for your work.

However, I noticed that most of the time the speaking experts are men, so I just listen to men (given the fact that the moderator is a man too). They all do great job, but I would love to listen women experts and I am sure there female experts almost in every field, maybe it just takes extra times to reach out.

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