310 episodes

Dhammatalks, Chanting, Precepts and Meditation
with Ajahn Dhammasiha and other
experienced Senior Buddhist Monks
in the Theravada Forest Tradition of Ajahn Chah.
Recorded at Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage,
Brisbane, Australia.

You can learn more about our monastery,
Ajahn Dhammasiha and our Sangha
at our website:
https://www.dhammagiri.net

We've also got a Youtube Channel,
including regular live podcasts on the weekend
"Dhammatalks at Dhammagiri":
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw

Our email Newsletter:
https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive


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Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage

    • Religion & Spirituality

Dhammatalks, Chanting, Precepts and Meditation
with Ajahn Dhammasiha and other
experienced Senior Buddhist Monks
in the Theravada Forest Tradition of Ajahn Chah.
Recorded at Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage,
Brisbane, Australia.

You can learn more about our monastery,
Ajahn Dhammasiha and our Sangha
at our website:
https://www.dhammagiri.net

We've also got a Youtube Channel,
including regular live podcasts on the weekend
"Dhammatalks at Dhammagiri":
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw

Our email Newsletter:
https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive


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    Just Stop! Everyone Can Change Themselves - Story of Anugulimala | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhammagiri

    Just Stop! Everyone Can Change Themselves - Story of Anugulimala | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhammagiri

    Ajahn Dhammasiha shares the story of Angulimāla, the most infamous mass murderer ('terrorist') in the time of the Buddha. He had already killed 999 persons, and was wearing their thumb bones as a kind of macabre necklace, when the Buddha visited the forest that was his main haunt.

    Once he had noticed the Buddha, Angulimāla rushed after him, trying to catch up. However, the Buddha used his supreme psychic powers in such a way that it appeared as if he was walking slowly and gracefully, but still moving too fast for Angulimala to reach him. 

    Exasperated, in the end Angulimāla cried out to the Buddha:
    "Stop, Ascetic!"  

    The Buddha replied:
    "I have stopped, please stop yourself, too!"  

    Puzzled, Angulimāla enquired what the Buddha meant.
    After all, he was too fast for him to catch up, so how could he have stopped?  

    The Buddha explains that he has stopped harming any being, that he has completely stopped using any form of violence.  

    This simple teaching had such a profound impact on Angulimāla that he took refuge in the Buddha, completely abandoned his violent lifestyle, and even asked for ordination as a monk. The Buddha granted him ordination, and practising with supreme commitment and determination, Angulimala later fully realized the Dhamma and became an Arahant.   

    Ajahn points out that we often may feel hopeless, or not quite good enough, or have doubts and feeling of guilt about past mistakes - but compared to Angulimāla, whatever we have done wrong is probably much, much less serious. Therefore, if even such an extreme murderer could completely change his ways, it's certainly possible for us as well to overcome whatever bad things we may have done in the past!   

    You can read the whole story in:
    Majjhima Nikāya / Middle Length Discourses
    Sutta #86 "Angulimāla Sutta





    More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage:

    https://www.dhammagiri.net



    Our Youtube Channel:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw



    Our email Newsletter:

    https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive



    Our Podcasts on Spotify:

    https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD



    Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes:

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834











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    • 43 min
    Breath and Dispassion | Guided Buddhist Meditation | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhammagiri | Ananpanasati Viraganupassi

    Breath and Dispassion | Guided Buddhist Meditation | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhammagiri | Ananpanasati Viraganupassi

    In this Guided Meditation, Ajahn Dhammasiha leads us to contemplate the forth foundation of mindfulness (4th Satipaṭṭhāna) in breath meditation (ānāpāṇasati):


    We breathe in and out contemplating & observing impermanence (anicca) not sure, not certain, unreliable

    We breathe in and out contemplating 'fading away' (virāga): both the fading away of external objects like sounds and thoughts, and also the fading away of desire, aversion, fear, liking and disliking, attachment - i.e. dispassion

    We breathe in and out contemplating ending, cessation (nirodha): both the cessation of external objects like sounds and thoughts, and also the ending desire, aversion, fear, liking and disliking, attachment

    We breathe in and out contemplating letting go (paṭinissagga)



    Very important:
    We do not contemplate the impermanence, ending and fading away of the breath. The breath is the anchor of our meditation, we can't let go of it.

    Instead, we contemplate the impermanence, fading away and cessation of all the thoughts, images, memories, phantasies, worries, desires and aversions that constantly arise in our mind and distract us from the breath. Even if we can't let go of them yet, let's just imagine how they are fading away.



    After the bell, it not quite over yet, as Ajahn adds some comments on using the same contemplations we used with the breath for our walking meditation.





    More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage:

    https://www.dhammagiri.net



    Our Youtube Channel:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw



    Our email Newsletter:

    https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive



    Our Podcasts on Spotify:

    https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD



    Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes:

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834



























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    • 30 min
    Renunciation or Non-Attachment? | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhamma Talk at Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage

    Renunciation or Non-Attachment? | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhamma Talk at Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage

    Ajahn Dhammasiha responds to a question:

    "Is renunciation or non-attachment the better practice?"

    Ajahn explains that both terms are often used largely synonymous, and that therefore it's not so much a question of 'either-or'. Both practices are concerned with 'letting go'.

    But it's also possible to understand these two terms with different nuances of meaning.

    On the one hand, one can 'renounce' something, even if one still has attachment to it. For example, someone may observe 8 precepts and not eat in the evening. He is 'renouncing' the evening meal for that day. However, he may still be attached to eating in the evening. It takes deliberate effort and determination to 'renounce' the evening meal, even though one would enjoy it, even though one is still attached to it.

    The term 'non-attachment', on the other hand, usually implies that desire, craving and clinging to the evening meal are really gone. It doesn't require any effort anymore to 'renounce' it, as the attachment is no longer there.

    Usually it's easier to develop real non-attachment by first renouncing. E.g. monks and nuns give up all their money before they ordain. But there may still be attachment, which even after giving it all up physically, takes a much longer time to truly overcome.


    It's more difficult to cultivate non-attachment to things we can't fully 'renounce'. Like for example food, or our physical bodies. Without food we couldn't live, we have to take food while we practice, we can't 'renounce' all food. Instead, we have to cultivate non-attachment while we're still taking food every day. This is much more difficult, and there's a danger that we may delude ourselves into thinking we're not attached, even though we're actually are.

    How deeply we're attached, we often only notice once we can't get the object of our attachment any more. Whenever possible, it's best to practice both, renunciation and non-attachment, together at the same time. First giving it away, or not indulging in it any more, and at the same time using wisdom to gradually abandon any remaining attachments.





    More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage:

    https://www.dhammagiri.net



    Our Youtube Channel:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw



    Our email Newsletter:

    https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive



    Our Podcasts on Spotify:

    https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD



    Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes:

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834







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    • 38 min
    Letting Go | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhammagiri | Why's the Mind Jumping away from the Meditation Object?

    Letting Go | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhammagiri | Why's the Mind Jumping away from the Meditation Object?

    It's good to remind ourselves regularly of the final purpose of all our Dhamma practice. Whether it's offering dana, or keeping precepts, developing sense restraint, or watching the breath in formal meditation - in the end all of this should lead to letting go.

    It's outright impossible to fix all problems in the external world, all issues with our own bodies, and all our relationships and interactions with other beings perfectly. Even if we do our best to make this world a better place, there will still be wars and conflict and sickness and death, as it has always been. The only real 'fix' is simply letting go of it all. Once the heart lets go completely of all conditioned phenomena, it will experience final release and permanent freedom from dukkha, independent from any external conditions. 

    Ajahn Dhammasiha also anwers a related question: Why is the mind jumping away from the meditation object, and how can we overcome this tendency.



    More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage:

    https://www.dhammagiri.net



    Our Youtube Channel:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw



    Our email Newsletter:

    https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive



    Our Podcasts on Spotify:

    https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD



    Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes:

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834



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    • 29 min
    Mudita - Wholesome Joy to Cultivate Awakening | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhammagiri | Buddha Grants 8 Favours to Lady Visakha

    Mudita - Wholesome Joy to Cultivate Awakening | Ajahn Dhammasiha | Dhammagiri | Buddha Grants 8 Favours to Lady Visakha

    Ajahn Dhammasiha encourages us to give more importance to developing forms of wholesome joy. Like muditā, rejoicing in other beings good actions and accomplishments.

    However dark the world sometimes may appear to us, if we look carefully, we can still find countless acts of goodness, kindness and beauty occurring all around us. Rather than focussing on problems, and indulging in the faultfinding mind, we can discover so many admirable deeds in this world.

    When we focus on rejoicing in all the good that is done around us, we have a never ending source of happiness available to us.

    Ajahn also relates the story how Lady Visākhā requested 8 favours from the Buddha. The Buddha granted her request, as he recognized her deep understanding of the mental process to cultivate Bhāvanā:

    She was using her amazing generosity not just to generate good karma and attain a fortunate rebirth. Instead, she deliberately used the joy she experienced when reflecting on her good acts as a support to develop rapture and samādhi. Next, she would then use samādhi to develop the factors of enlightenment (satta bojjhangā) to attain Nibbāna.



    More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage:

    https://www.dhammagiri.net



    Our Youtube Channel:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw



    Our email Newsletter:

    https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive



    Our Podcasts on Spotify:

    https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD



    Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes:

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834







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    • 42 min
    Robe Offering Ceremony, Refuge, Precepts, Blessing | Ajahn Kalyano Visits Dhammagiri in Kathina Season

    Robe Offering Ceremony, Refuge, Precepts, Blessing | Ajahn Kalyano Visits Dhammagiri in Kathina Season

    🔸️Intro (Ajahn Dhammasiha, MC)

    🔸️Requesting Triple Refuge & 5 Precepts (Dr Mallik & Vijitha)

    🔸️Taking Refuge in Buddha, Dhamma & Sangha  (Conducted by Ajahn Dta Candavaṃso)

    🔸️Committing to the 5 Precepts (Conducted by Ajahn Dta Candavaṃso)

    🔸️Recitation of Paṃsukūla Sangha-dāna (Dr Mallik & Vijitha)

    🔸️Offering of Robes & Forest Cloth to Sangha (All Sangha & Laity)

    🔸️Sangha silently contemplates Paṃsukūla Robes (Sangha)

    🔸️Recitation of "Kāle dadanti sappaññā..." - Offerings at Auspicious Occasion (Sangha)

    🔸️Apalokana Sangha Kamma - Formal Decision of the Sangha to share Sangha Offerings for individual use (Ajahn Khantiko)

    🔸️Anumodanā (Rejoicing) & Blessing (Sangha led by Luang Por Kalyano)





    This year Ven Ajahn Kalyano and four other senior monks have kindly  accepted our invitation to join us for the ceremony, giving us a Sangha  of eight Bhikkhus: 

    🔶 Luang Por Kalyano & Ajahn Dta Candavaṃso from Buddha  Bodhivana Monastery, Warburton near Melbourne. 

    🔶 Ajahn Saeang and Ajahn Varadhammo from Bodhisaddha Monastery,  Wilton near Sydney 

    🔶 Ajahn Khantiko from Wat Doi Mongkonsathan Hermitage in Chiang Mai  province

    🔶️ Our own resident monks Ajahn Dhammasiha, Ajahn Moneyyo & Tan Niddaro 





    On the day of the ceremony we had a severe wether event, with torrential  rains, storms, flooding, and the government issuing a warning to do  only 'essential' travel. One of the two main roads to Dhammagiri was  already flooded and impassable.  Amazingly, some 150 people still came out to join, and they all  thoroughly enjoyed it. With their hearts focussed on making good karma  through generostiy, observing precepts, and listening to Dhamma, they  didn't mind some physical discomfort from inclement weather. Even though  the sky was grey 🌧 and raining, our hearts where sunny 🌞, bright, and  joyful throughout the event 😊



    We all received a beautiful teaching that out true happiness does not  depend on external conditions, but on the quality of our heart. A heart  filled with goodness and good karma is happy inside, even in adverse  external conditions.



    Please note ceremony above is not a formal Kathina, but an offering of 'Forest Cloth' (Pali: Pamsukūla) (Thai: Pah Bah), as conducted if less than 5 monks have spent the rains retreat at the monastery.





    More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage:

    https://www.dhammagiri.net



    Our Youtube Channel:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw



    Our email Newsletter:

    https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive



    Our Podcasts on Spotify:

    https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD



    Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes:

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834





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    • 23 min

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