680 episodes

Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 40 million downloads and the #1 search result for management on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

Coaching for Leaders Dave Stachowiak

    • Business

Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 40 million downloads and the #1 search result for management on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

    The Way to Handle Q&A, with Matt Abrahams

    The Way to Handle Q&A, with Matt Abrahams

    Matt Abrahams: Think Faster, Talk Smarter

    Matt Abrahams is an educator, author, podcast host, and coach. He is a lecturer in Organizational Behavior at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and a keynote speaker and communication consultant for Fortune 100 companies. He is the host of the popular podcast Think Fast, Talk Smart and the author of Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You're Put on the Spot*.



    One of the most common places leaders get put on the spot is when facilitating a question and answer session. In this episode, Matt and I discuss the mindset, preparation, and steps that will help you answer questions with confidence and increase credibility with your audience.

    Key Points



    Many presenters think about a Q&A session like playing dodgeball. It’s more helpful to frame it as dialogue.

    Answering questions well allows you to project authenticity, expand on key points, and resolve objections.

    Use the ADD framework to respond to a question. A: answer the question, D: detail an example, and D: describe the value. If helpful, adjust the order.

    Set boundaries for the kinds of questions you’ll answer and the timeframe for them. The audience expects you to lead the conversation.

    Ask yourself a question if nobody else asks one first. This might start with, “A question I’m commonly asked…”

    End with an exclamation point. Sticking the landing provides you confidence and shows credibility to your audience.



    Resources Mentioned



    Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You're Put on the Spot* by Matt Abrahams



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450)

    How to Rehearse Before a Presentation, with Jacqueline Farrington (episode 645)

    That’s a Great Question (Dave’s Journal)



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    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

    • 39 min
    Becoming More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier

    Becoming More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier

    Michael Bungay Stanier: The Coaching Habit

    Michael Bungay Stanier is the author of eight books, including The Coaching Habit*, which has sold more than a million copies and is the best-selling book on coaching this century. He is the founder Box of Crayons, a learning and development company that’s trained thousands of people around the world to be more coach-like. His TEDx Talk on Taming Your Advice Monster has been viewed more than a million times.



    One of the most common desires leaders espouse is wanting to get better at helping others grow. One great way to do that is to become more coach-like. In this conversation, Michael and I explore how we can do better at building this skill.

    Key Points



    Care deeply for others while also being disconnected from their outcomes. Give people responsibility for their own freedom.

    Consider asking, “How much risk are you willing to take?” Allow the other party to define the boundaries.

    Bring a difficult observation as a third point. Separate the message from the person and let them decide what’s true.

    Avoid asking “why” questions of others to avoid putting people on the defensive and trying to solve their problems.

    A helpful checkpoint: is this question something that’s helping me or helping the other party?

    Silence is a measure of success. When you ask as question that lands, people need time to answer.

    Your body leads your brain. Notice your physical presence and how it manifests when you’re listening well.



    Resources Mentioned



    The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier

    Register your book receipt for bonus items from Michael



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)

    Leadership in the Midst of Chaos, with Jim Mattis (episode 440)

    How to Lead Better Through Complexity, with Jennifer Garvey Berger (episode 613)

    How to Help Others Be Seen and Heard, with Scott Shigeoka (episode 654)



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    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

    • 38 min
    Make it Easier to Discuss Hard Things, with Jeff Wetzler

    Make it Easier to Discuss Hard Things, with Jeff Wetzler

    Jeff Wetzler: Ask

    Jeff Wetzler is co-CEO of Transcend, a nationally recognized innovation organization, and an expert in learning and human potential. His experience spans 25+ years in business and education, as a management consultant to top corporations, a learning facilitator for leaders, and as Chief Learning Officer at Teach For America.



    He is a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network and is an Edmund Hillary Fellow. Jeff is the author of Ask: Tap Into the Hidden Wisdom of People Around You for Unexpected Breakthroughs in Leadership and Life*.



    Leaders are not the only people who need to have difficult conversations in the workplace. Yet, leaders set the tone for how much people are willing and able to talk about hard things. In this episode, Jeff and I discuss how leaders can make it easier for those important conversations to happen.

    Key Points



    In one study of managers, most people admitted to remaining silent with their bosses and nearly 75% said colleagues also felt uncomfortable speaking up.

    Meet people on their own turf. Others are more likely to speak up if they are in a setting that’s more comfortable for them.

    Leaders should consider shifting timing and/or medium to one that’s of the preference for the person who doesn’t have power.

    Explain why you’re asking about a topic and your intention for a conversation at the start. Providing context prevents people from having to guess at your agenda.

    Set a mutual agenda for a conversation by asking a question like, “In addition to this, what else should be part of our conversation today?”

    Establish a tone for open communication by radiating resilience. Words like these might help: “If I were in your shoes, I might be feeling frustrated or even resentful. If that’s how you’re feeling, I would understand completely. Please don’t hold back.”



    Resources Mentioned



    Ask: Tap Into the Hidden Wisdom of People Around You for Unexpected Breakthroughs in Leadership and Life* by Jeff Wetzler



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454)

    The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529)

    How to Grow From Your Errors, with Amy Edmondson (episode 663)



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    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

    • 34 min
    The Power of Unlearning Silence, with Elaine Lin Hering

    The Power of Unlearning Silence, with Elaine Lin Hering

    Elaine Lin Hering: Unlearning Silence

    Elaine Lin Hering is a facilitator, speaker, and writer who helps people build skills in communication, collaboration, and conflict management. She is a former Managing Partner of Triad Consulting Group and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, specializing in dispute resolution, mediation, and negotiation. She is the author of Unlearning Silence: How to Speak Your Mind, Unleash Your Talent, and Live More Fully.



    Those of us who have struggled to speak up have been told, “Just be more confident,” or, “Say this to get started.” As Elaine and I discuss in this conversation, there’s a larger context at play…and great power for both leaders and the people they lead, in unlearning silence.

    Key Points



    Start with why. For change to actually happen, find something that matters more than the old behavior.

    What seems obvious to us isn’t always obvious to others. Connecting the dots for others demonstrates the meaning you’re making.

    Beginning a thought with, “From where I sit…” provides a entry point for what you need to say while also acknowledging different perspectives from others.

    Most people want to be helpful, but don’t always know how. Tell them how they can be helpful in the moment.

    Resistance is part of the process of influencing others. While it doesn’t feel good in the moment, it’s often the catalyst for creating movement.



    Resources Mentioned



    Unlearning Silence: How to Speak Your Mind, Unleash Your Talent, and Live More Fully* by Elaine Lin Hering



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546)

    End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556)

    The Mindset Leaders Need to Address Burnout, with Christina Maslach (episode 608)



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    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

    • 38 min
    How Leaders Can Better Support High-Achieving Women, with Sohee Jun

    How Leaders Can Better Support High-Achieving Women, with Sohee Jun

    Sohee Jun

    Sohee Jun is a leadership coach for female executives, leaders, founders, and entrepreneurs. She is also a TEDx speaker, Forbes Coaches Council member, keynote speaker, leadership development expert, and author. With over twenty years in the corporate world, she has worked with Fortune 500 companies, including those in the entertainment, production, and media sectors such as Netflix, Fox, and Disney.



    In 2020, Sohee released her first book, Mommytracked: How to Take Authentic Risks and Find Success on Your Terms, with the goal of helping ambitious women tap into their inner core throughout the different phases of their lives. She's now the author of a second book, The Inner Game: Secrets of High-Achieving Women for Navigating Work, Life, and Mindset*.



    In a world where still too few women are represented in senior leadership roles, many of us want to do whatever we can to support high-achieving women. In this conversation, Sohee and I explore what her research and experience indicates that leaders can do to better support women in their careers.

    Key Points



    Leaders can support both women and men by framing the larger “why” or North Star. Providing context helps a point of focus to emerge.

    Do it afraid. Provide support to work through fearful situations with success.

    When supporting women in building confidence, help them recognize what they’ve already achieved.

    Normalize the discussion about financial literacy. Opening the door to dialogue around salary negotiation helps equalize the salary gap.

    One question can set the tone for better work and life integration. Leaders can proactively ask about boundaries.



    Resources Mentioned



    The Inner Game: Secrets of High-Achieving Women for Navigating Work, Life, and Mindset* by Sohee Jun



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Prioritize, with Christy Wright (episode 545)

    How to Protect Your Confidence, with Nate Zinsser (episode 573)

    The Path Towards Your Next Promotion, with Adam Bryant (episode 653)



    Discover More

    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

    • 39 min
    How to Change People’s Minds, with Michael McQueen

    How to Change People’s Minds, with Michael McQueen

    Michael McQueen: Mindstuck

    Michael McQueen has spent the past two decades helping organizations and leaders win the battle for relevance. He specializes in helping clients navigate uncertainty and stay one step ahead of change.



    Michael is a bestselling author of nine books and a familiar face on the international conference circuit, having shared the stage with the likes of Bill Gates, Dr. John C. Maxwell, and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak. Having formerly been named Australia’s Keynote Speaker of the Year, he has been inducted into the Professional Speakers Hall of Fame. He is the author of Mindstuck: Mastering the Art of Changing Minds*.



    There’s a lot of evidence that our minds would rather feel right than be right. How then, do you influence someone when they are really convinced of their position? In this conversation, Michael and I discuss the initial steps that help in changing people’s minds.

    Key Points



    Our tendency is to convince to the inquiring mind, but we’ll do better if we speak to the instinctive mind first.

    Help others lessen loss and maintain dignity by preserving titles, language, and symbols in things that are new.

    Instead of trying making an argument, ask a question that allows the other person to listen to themselves.

    Ask questions that clarify points of resistance or misunderstanding.

    Speak like you’re right, listen like you’re wrong.



    Resources Mentioned



    Mindstuck: Mastering the Art of Changing Minds* by Michael McQueen



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450)

    Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500)

    Three Practices for Thriving in Negotiations, with William Ury (episode 669)



    Discover More

    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

    • 39 min

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