53 episodes

Cycling’s odd couple is back with an informative, entertaining, and occasionally feisty new podcast. Longtime friends and former teammates Bobby Julich and Jens Voigt shared the agonies and ecstasies of World Tour racing, gaining an unrivaled understanding and appreciation for the sport. Every week, they bring insightful commentary and unique chemistry to conversations with the riders, coaches, and diverse new personalities shaping today’s scene. Tune in for revealing interviews about life at the front—and back—of the peloton, along with behind-the-scenes stories about emerging trends in training, gear, and coaching.

Bobby and Jen‪s‬ VeloNews

    • Sports

Cycling’s odd couple is back with an informative, entertaining, and occasionally feisty new podcast. Longtime friends and former teammates Bobby Julich and Jens Voigt shared the agonies and ecstasies of World Tour racing, gaining an unrivaled understanding and appreciation for the sport. Every week, they bring insightful commentary and unique chemistry to conversations with the riders, coaches, and diverse new personalities shaping today’s scene. Tune in for revealing interviews about life at the front—and back—of the peloton, along with behind-the-scenes stories about emerging trends in training, gear, and coaching.

    João Correia

    João Correia

    Bobby Julich and Jens Voigt sit down with former pro and cycling super agent João Correia.

    He's the man behind Corso, the rider agency that has launched the careers of young riders like Tao Geoghegan Hart, Joao Almeida, Mads Pederson, Ruben Guerreiro, Michael Valgren and many, many more. João talks about crashing into ambulances, supporting equality and upsetting Marc Madiot! 

    Plus find out which rider has absolutely buried themselves for the cause as Bobby and Jens dish out their #shutuplegs rider of the week! Don't forget to nominate yours for next week by using the hashtag #shutuplegs on Twitter or Instagram.

    Bobby and Jens is a VeloNews production in association with Shocked Giraffe. This episode was produced by Mark Payne and edited by Kirk Warner.

    • 52 min
    Marcel Kittel

    Marcel Kittel

    Bobby Julich and Jens Voigt sit down with sprinting sensation Marcel Kittel for his first English language interview in two years.
    Sit down for an enlightening conversation as Marcel talks about earning the rainbow bands as a time trialist in the junior ranks, dominating sprints in a time trialist, surviving the mammoth mountains of the Grand Tours and finding peace in retirement - amongst many other things!
    Plus find out which rider has absolutely buried themselves for the cause as Bobby and Jens dish out their #shutuplegs rider of the week! Don't forget to nominate yours for next week by using the hashtag #shutuplegs on Twitter or Instagram
    Bobby and Jens is a VeloNews production in association with Shocked Giraffe. This episode was produced by Mark Payne and edited by Kirk Warner.
    To advertise on the podcast email Sales@velonews.com

    • 54 min
    The Prologue

    The Prologue

    Bobby Julich and Jens Voigt roll down the ramp for this prologue episode! While the boys will be spending the rest of the season talking to cycling's stars, this time it'll just be Bobby and Jens chatting about the sport they love and their relationship.
    In the roadbook for this episode - banning the super tuck, disc brakes and why Jens is never on time for breakfast!
    Remember to subscribe to never miss an episode!
    This episode was edited by Kirk Warner. The producer was Mark Payne on behalf of VeloNews and Shocked Giraffe.

    • 29 min
    PYSO, ep. 83: Nike's Kieran Ronan on riding all day inside for World Bicycle Relief

    PYSO, ep. 83: Nike's Kieran Ronan on riding all day inside for World Bicycle Relief

    One day. Five hundred kilometers — inside. And one cause - World Bicycle Relief.

    On this special episode of Put Your Socks On, Bobby and Gus check in with Kieran Ronan, a longtime Nike executive and cyclist who is preparing to ride 500km — 310 miles — on December 30 as a fundraiser for World Bicycle Relief.

    There are the numbers, and then there are the reasons behind the ride. PYSO digs into both.

    "It's just really an interesting way how somebody of my age has had to adapt, and how the virtual world on social media can actually do good," Ronan says. "And that's that's the big takeaway that I've had in a sense of community with a love of cycling, that can be transported across the globe and bring more people along."

    If you are interested in supporting or even joining Ronan for part or all of his Zwift ride, you can read more here:https://www.velonews.com/culture/the-grind-up-for-a-challenge-try-500km-on-december-30/

    • 48 min
    PYSO, ep. 82: Chris Froome on his unusual path to the top of cycling

    PYSO, ep. 82: Chris Froome on his unusual path to the top of cycling

    At the 2006 UCI world championships in Austria, a young Chris Froome walked into the manager's briefing meeting, sopping wet in his cycling kit. He was told he wasn't welcome - the meeting was for managers only. He said he was the manager, and he plopped himself down.

    And in fact he was. He was Kenya's sole representative in Austria. Earlier that year, Froome had impersonated the Kenya cycling federation president in email to enter himself into the races. There was no one else to support him. He had flown, alone with his time trial and road bikes, to Europe for the first time.

    He was figuring it out.

    Two days later, he started the U23 time trial and, just as he was getting underway, collided with a race official on course.

    Fast forward to today, and Froome of course has won seven grand tours and multiple Olympic and world championship medals. The young man from Kenya found a way.

    On this episode of Put Your Socks On, Froome checks in from California, where he is training four day a week at the Red Bull Performance Center. Froome talks about what is was like growing up in Africa, the obstacles he faced in breaking into a European sport, and his love for racing.

    • 53 min
    PYSO, ep. 81: UCI innovation manager Michael Rogers on progress and regulation

    PYSO, ep. 81: UCI innovation manager Michael Rogers on progress and regulation

    The Lugano Charter, constructed in 1996, formed the UCI's basis for regulation of bike technology with a noble ideal: the rider, not his or her access to technology, should determine who wins a bike race. The devil, as always, is in the details.

    Now, Michael "Mick" Rogers, a three-time world time trial champion, is tasked with guiding the regulation of bicycle equipment and clothing as innovation manager at the UCI.

    Rogers got his start in big-time racing with Mapei in 2000. He proceeded to have a successful career with Quick-Step, T-Mobile, Team Sky and Saxo-Tinkoff before retiring in 2016. In addition to having world-class physiology, Rogers was also fascinated with the physics and mathematics at play in bike racing, whether that was in the mechanics of a long sprint leadout train, or in the interconnected variables of a fast time trial position.

    At T-Mobile, which became HTC, Rogers said "we were one of the the teams to really master the leadout train. If we go back into the mid ’90s with [Marco] Cipollini and Saeco, they revolutionized the leadout train. At HTC, we took that that one step further, we started to understand some of the mathematics. We started to understand that when we were riding on the front, with two or three kilometers to go, we're at 60 plus K an hour — the amount of energy that the riders behind us would would need to come up beside Mark Cavendish was going to have a massive effect on the actual sprint."

    Rogers' real-world studying later included time racing at Team Sky, a team famous for its analysis and methodical racing tactics. Rogers talks about how the team could be so effective when riding in coordination.

    "It just kind of came down to, we knew what we were good at as riders," Rogers said of being able to reel in breakaways and attacking riders with confidence. "Simple math — when we were riding at our threshold, the power values and very high power to weight ratios. We knew that anyone riding out over that threshold, to be able to open up a large enough gap, the amount of energy required to put in is almost for most people unbearable. When you're attacking on some of these climbs, you might have to ride at 600 650 watts for for 30 to 40 seconds. And there's only a handful of guys that can withstand that kind of intensity for anything longer than a minute. So it's simple math, they're going to come back."

    Now at the UCI, Rogers and his coworkers are tasked with keeping up to speed with a sport that is changing rapidly.

    "We are aware that cycling must progress. There must be evolution," Rogers said.

    How that looks, and how a level playing field can be enforces among teams and nations with varying levels of financial ability, will be an ongoing challenge.

    Tune in to this episode of Put Your Socks On to hear Rogers' thoughts on the challenges and the excitement of regulating bike racing heading into a new world of cycling.

    • 56 min

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