368 episodes

Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Wednesday by Economist Podcasts.
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Money Talks from The Economist The Economist

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Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Wednesday by Economist Podcasts.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Money Talks: The rate shock

    Money Talks: The rate shock

    The world’s financial markets are going through their most painful adjustment since the global financial crisis. Global stock markets have sold off sharply and bond markets are on course for their worst year since 1949. The British pound briefly fell to its lowest level ever against the dollar. And the Japanese government has intervened to prop up the value of the yen for the first time since 1998. What’s underlying this shift?
    On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood, Mike Bird and Soumaya Keynes are joined by our business affairs editor Patrick Foulis to parse the fallout from this month’s synchronous decision by the majority of the world’s central banks to raise interest rates. They’ll look at the idiosyncrasies of two outliers: Britain, where the government’s tax cuts are at odds with the Bank of England’s desire to reign in prices, and Japan, where the central bank recently decided to keep rates negative. Plus, Blue Bay Asset Management’s chief investment officer Mark Dowding explains why he’s decided to bet against sterling. And former Bank of Japan policy committee member Goushi Kataoka outlines why he thinks a weak yen could spell opportunity for Japan’s ailing economy.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 33 min
    Money Talks: Beyond seasonable doubt

    Money Talks: Beyond seasonable doubt

    Lawsuits aimed at green-house gas emissions are a growing trend, and better science is making them more precise. As ESG comes under attack, could these suits represent a different front in pressuring companies to act on climate change?
    On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird speak with our environment editor Catherine Brahic about the rise in climate litigation aimed at holding companies responsible for climate change. Then, we head to Peru, to meet the farmer at the centre of a potentially seismic court case against Germany’s largest electricity firm. Finally, Sophie Marjanac of the environmental organisation ClientEarth explains why the law can be a useful way to outline the responsibilities of corporations when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions and who pays the costs of a warming planet.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 37 min
    Money talks: India's moment

    Money talks: India's moment

    India’s economy recently overtook Britain’s to be the world’s fifth largest, and it’s on track to be the fastest growing big economy this year. Part of what’s powering that growth is renewed domestic investment by the country’s big conglomerates. Could this be the year that India’s promise is realised?
    On this week’s episode, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood examine what’s powering India’s growth. First, Natarajan Chandrasekaran, the chairman of India’s biggest conglomerate, Tata Sons, explains why the company is investing $90bn domestically. Then, our global energy and climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran heads to Pune, where he finds that India’s green energy transition is well underway. Finally, our Mumbai bureau chief Tom Easton takes a tour of Tamil Nadu, where he sees factories rapidly being built to help power India’s domestic manufacturing transition. 
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 36 min
    Money Talks: Running on empty

    Money Talks: Running on empty

    Europe is facing a catastrophic energy crisis. Prices for the natural gas needed to power many of its electricity plants have increased ten-fold since last summer. Most recently, Russia has choked off gas supplies to the Nord Stream 1 pipeline in retaliation against the G-7’s decision to put a cap on Russian oil prices. What needs to be done to keep homes warm this winter?
    On this week’s episode, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird investigate the options facing European governments as they scramble to tackle soaring consumer energy bills. First, our Europe economics editor Christian Odendahl explains the extent of the problem and the structural factors that underpin it. Then, the IMF’s Assistant Director for Europe Oya Celasun describes how direct cash support can protect the poor from surging energy prices. Finally, Scottish Power chief executive Keith Anderson outlines his plan for a state-supported price freeze and structural reform of the UK’s energy market.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 37 min
    Money Talks: Will the electric vehicle boom go bust?

    Money Talks: Will the electric vehicle boom go bust?

    This month, California banned the sale of petrol cars by 2035. It could prompt a third of American states to embrace electric vehicles more quickly. But America is a laggard when it comes to the EV revolution. The European Parliament voted in June for a ban on sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2035. Japan and others are also aiming for a ban by 2035. But government efforts to encourage consumers to switch to buying electric cars could run into the reality that there isn’t yet enough capacity to manufacture the batteries necessary to power all those cars. 
    On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood, Soumaya Keynes and Mike Bird look at whether the EV boom could go bust before it gets going. They’re joined by our industry editor Simon Wright who lays out the challenges battery manufacturers face in getting raw materials. Then, Peter Carlsson, the chief executive of European battery manufacturer Northvolt, outlines the challenges his firm faced in building a gigafactory in Sweden. Finally, Ford’s vice-president of sustainability Bob Holycross explains why the carmaker sees the switch to EVs as a refounding of the company.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 37 min
    Money Talks: Who is winning the sanctions war?

    Money Talks: Who is winning the sanctions war?

    At the outset of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the West united to impose unprecedented sanctions on Vladimir Putin’s regime. Six months on, a furious debate has erupted about the true state of Russia’s economy, which has so far defied the gloomiest predictions.. So is the West losing the sanctions war?
    On this week’s episode, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood are joined by senior economics writer Callum Williams to investigate why Russia’s economy is doing better than expected. Then Nicholas Mulder, assistant professor of history at Cornell University, explains how long it has taken for sanctions to have an impact in the past. Finally, deputy chief economist at the Institute for International Finance Elina Ribakova outlines what further measures the West could take.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 38 min

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