300 episodes

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    The World Ahead: NPT threats

    The World Ahead: NPT threats

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty turns 50 this year, but the celebrations may be short-lived. Also, the challenges facing Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, as he tries to keep both China and America happy. And why the future of video-gaming may play out in the cloud. Tom Standage hosts.   
     
    Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)
     
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    • 21 min
    Peace-meal: ceasefire in Afghanistan

    Peace-meal: ceasefire in Afghanistan

    For now, a “reduction in violence” is holding, and a long-awaited agreement hangs in the balance. But can the Taliban and the country’s government engineer a lasting peace? Brazil’s surfers dominate the sport, but perhaps not for long. And the mismatch between teens’ job desires and their prospects.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 22 min
    Checks and Balance: Mike drop

    Checks and Balance: Mike drop

    Michael Bloomberg is trying to transform the Democrat presidential field through the sheer weight of his cash. But does politics in America really work that way? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, Jon Fasman, and Charlotte Howard assess whether Bloomberg’s advertising campaign matches his mayoral record, why a legal case from the Watergate era has been crucial to the billionaire’s campaign, and how South Carolina’s minority voters are reassessing the moderate field. 


    Listen to The Economist Asks: Michael Bloomberg


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    • 34 min
    Clerical era: Iran’s elections

    Clerical era: Iran’s elections

    In a bid to unite a fractious populace, hardliners barred half of the parliamentary candidates; by silencing moderates, the plan will suppress turnout and deepen the disquiet. We take a look at the rise, fall and this week’s pardon of the “junk-bond king” Michael Milken. And why so few Japanese people use their widely welcomed passports.
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    • 21 min
    Editor’s Picks: February 20th 2020

    Editor’s Picks: February 20th 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to make sense of the latest tech surge, (10:20) examining Jeff Bezos’s $10bn promise to fight climate change (15:30) and, Bagehot on Boris - the imperial prime minister. Zanny Minton-Beddoes, The Economist’s Editor-in-chief hosts.


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    • 22 min
    The Economist Asks: What makes an extremist?

    The Economist Asks: What makes an extremist?

    Technology has transformed the way extremist groups recruit and mobilise their members. Julia Ebner, author of “Going Dark”, spent two years undercover inside radical organisations of all political hues. This week, in the wake of a far-right terrorist attack in the German town of Hanau, Anne McElvoy asks her what drives perpetrators to commit mass violence. They talk about how Julia won the trust of neo-Nazis and militant Islamists, how gamification is used to radicalise—and why she believes counter-terrorism experts need to understand their subjects better
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    • 29 min

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