99 episodes

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Business Matters BBC

    • Business

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

    California Governor reverses state's re-openings

    California Governor reverses state's re-openings

    As the World Health Organisation says 'too many countries are headed in the wrong direction', California's governor, Gavin Newsom has announced a sweeping rollback of the state's reopening - including a statewide closure of all bars. Staying in the US, NFL team, The Washington Redskins has confirmed that it will change its name and logo; we hear more from the Washington Post's Les Carpenter. The BBC's Rob Young reports on the growing coronavirus crisis in South Africa. Meanwhile a group of millionaires has signed a letter asking the U.S. and other countries to raise taxes on the rich "immediately" and "permanently" to pay for aid needed to help poorer citizens get through the coronavirus pandemic; we hear from signatory, Morris Pearl, a former BlackRock managing director. And we're joined throughout the programme by Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus and Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network. And from the US, we speak to Peter Morici, an economist at the University of Maryland. (Picture of California Governor Gavin Newsom by Agustin Paullier via Getty Images)

    • 52 min
    Historic Supreme Court win for Native Americans

    Historic Supreme Court win for Native Americans

    The US Supreme Court ruled on Thursday about half of Oklahoma belongs to Native Americans, in a landmark case that also quashed a child rape conviction. The justices decided 5-4 that an eastern chunk of the state, including its second-biggest city, Tulsa, should be recognised as part of a reservation. We hear from representatives of the Muscogee Creek and Cherokee Nations about the significance of this ruling. Also in the programme, Amazon has said an email sent to employees asking them to remove the video-sharing app TikTok from any mobile device that can access their company email was sent in error. The BBC's Michelle Fleury breaks down the security concerns Amazon may have about TikTok. And we have an in-depth report examining how African American-owned assets can be undervalued. Plus, a new book explores the historical relationship between McDonalds and black business owners.

    All through the show we'll be joined by business journalist Peter Ryan, senior business correspondent with the ABC in Sydney.

    (Picture: A representative of the Choctaw nation. Picture credit: Shutterstock)

    • 52 min
    Will President Trump have to give up his tax returns?

    Will President Trump have to give up his tax returns?

    The US Supreme Court has ruled that President Trump's financial records can be examined by prosecutors in New York. In a related case, the court ruled that this information did not have to be shared with Congress. Law professor and host of the "Passing Judgement" podcast Jessica Levinson explains the significance of these rulings. Also in the programme, pop music expert Charlie Harding discusses what we’ve been listening to during the pandemic, and what it says about how we collectively get through crises. We speak to two parents working from home on the challenges of changing career paths while stuck at home with the kids. The BBC's Sharanjit Leyl reports on Singapore’s 'pandemic' election. And we hear from some African technology entrepreneurs how their sector has actually been boosted by the pandemic.

    (Picture: The US Supreme Court building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

    • 51 min
    Pressure on US schools to re-open

    Pressure on US schools to re-open

    As President Trump pushes for US schools to re-open in August, Tawnell Hobbs, education reporter for The Wall Street Journal, explains how teachers and parents are reacting.
    Meanwhile, Jason Furman, former chief economist to President Obama, weighs in on the different stimulus strategies countries have taken to get their economy going again.
    Also in the programme, we ask how German electronic payment firm Wirecard fell afoul of a big accounting scandal. The BBC’s Samira Hussain reports on the rise of stay-at-home day traders during coronavirus lockdown.
    And how a classic Magic Realism novel inspired modern-day Colombians to exchange letters of support, anonymously.
    All through the show we’ll be joined by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC and Sushma Ramachandran, columnist for the Tribune in Delhi.

    (Picture: US President Donald Trump. Picture Credit: Getty Images.)

    • 51 min
    Coronavirus: Airborne transmission cannot be ruled out

    Coronavirus: Airborne transmission cannot be ruled out

    The World Health Organisation has acknowledged evidence of the airborne spread of coronavirus, after a group of scientists signed a letter urging it to update its guidance on the disease’s transmission. One of the signatories, Joseph Allen, an Assistant Professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, explains his concerns.

    Also in the programme, Deutsche Bank will pay a $150 million penalty to a New York regulator, mainly for failing to properly monitor its relationship with convicted child abuser Jeffrey Epstein, as Kadhim Shubber of the Financial Times explains.

    A new report from Chatham House warns malnutrition in developing economies could cost businesses in the developing world dear. And as the continuing coronavirus pandemic forces universities to stay mostly online, we look at the impact that will have.

    Rob Young is joined by Sarah Birke, correspondent for the Economist in Tokyo, and political reporter Erin Delmore in New York.

    (Picture: A man in the US wearing a mask. Picture credit: Getty Images)

    • 52 min
    Tech giants stop giving Hong Kong police user data

    Tech giants stop giving Hong Kong police user data

    Several countries have criticised China for imposing a new security law on Hong Kong, which they say threatens the territory's long-standing. Some of the world's largest social media and internet businesses - including Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, Google and Telegram - have all said they are "pausing" co-operation with requests for user information from the Hong Kong police, until they can assess the situation. The BBC's North America Technology Correspondent, James Clayton, tells us more. Meanwhile, could self-guiding, autonomous ships be the future? And, we talk to Hollywood Reporter Contributing Editor Jonathan Handel about how streaming a production of the musical Hamilton may just have given Disney's new online service an enormous boost. We discuss the implications of all these stories, and more, with Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report, and Economist Andy Xie. (Picture credit: Getty Images)

    • 52 min

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