385 episodes

Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Thursday by Economist Podcasts.
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Money Talks from The Economist The Economist

    • News

Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Thursday by Economist Podcasts.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Money Talks: Can Disney rekindle the magic?

    Money Talks: Can Disney rekindle the magic?

    The Walt Disney Company turns 100 years old this week. But the silver screen success that helped it become the world’s biggest entertainment company will not be enough to keep it on top for another century. As households swap cable packages for streaming, and kids turn to gaming, rather than movies, Disney needs reanimating.
    On this week’s podcast, hosts Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird ask whether Disney has lost its touch. The Economist’s Tom Wainwright takes us on a tour of the Magic Kingdom, to assess its sprawling empire. Analyst Rich Greenfield explains why the company is losing billions on streaming. And Matthew Ball, former head of strategy for Amazon Studios, tells us about the big bet Disney needs to make if it wants to retain its crown.
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    • 41 min
    Money Talks: How globalisation gave way

    Money Talks: How globalisation gave way

    America has changed the way it views the rest of the world. Rather than pushing for a more globalised economy with fewer trade barriers, the US is now seeking a more protected system of international trade. President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act promises nearly $400bn to boost clean energy and reduce dependence on China for things like batteries for electric cars. The Chips Act, meanwhile, provides incentives worth $52bn to boost America’s semiconductor industry.
    On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood examine what this new zero-sum era means for the global economy. Chad Bown from the Peterson Institute for International Economics tells them the age of globalisation isn’t returning any time soon. Henry Gao from Singapore Management University blames America’s attempt to “out-China China by becoming more like China”.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 41 min
    Money Talks: The new power in the North Sea

    Money Talks: The new power in the North Sea

    For decades, the North Sea’s fierce gales have created a challenge for those extracting the oil and gas buried beneath its swells. But the region’s poor weather is also the key to its future: offshore wind. And the plans are surprisingly ambitious.
    On this week’s podcast, hosts Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird ask whether the North Sea can turn green. The Economist’s Matthieu Favas says wind farms in the North Sea could power Europe’s 200m homes. Jesper Frost Rasmussen, mayor of Esbjerg, explains how the offshore wind industry has changed life in the Danish port town. Ulrik Stridbæk of Orsted, the world’s largest offshore wind developer, says that some sites are already generating the same amount of power as a large nuclear power station. Plus, we speak to Thomas Dalsgaard about why his firm, Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners, wants to build a physical island 100 kilometres off the coast of Denmark. 
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 35 min
    Money Talks: The economics of thinness

    Money Talks: The economics of thinness

    Across the rich world there is a negative relationship between incomes and weight, as measured by body mass index. The richer people are, the thinner they tend to be. But separate the data by gender and a startling gap appears. Rich women are much thinner than poorer ones; but rich men and poor men are just as likely to be overweight or obese.
    On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwood and Thomas Lee-Devlin examine why it may be rational, in economic terms, for ambitious women to pursue thinness. John Cawley of Cornell University explains his research that suggests overweight women have lower salaries than their thinner peers. We examine the legacy of Helen Gurley Brown, the outspoken former editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine, who championed dieting to get ahead. And Jennifer Shinall, a law professor at Vanderbilt University, considers potential solutions to weight-based discrimination.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 34 min
    Money Talks: TikTok’s ticking time bomb—an episode from our archive

    Money Talks: TikTok’s ticking time bomb—an episode from our archive

    It’s the fastest growing app in the world, filled with dance trends, cats misbehaving, and questionable financial advice. Teenagers love it; Western politicians are less convinced. Could TikTok’s popularity be its downfall?
    In one of our favourite episodes of 2022, hosts Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes investigate just who is afraid of TikTok’s growing influence. First, our media editor Tom Wainwright unpacks the relationship between TikTok, its parent company ByteDance, and its Chinese twin, Douyin. Then, AB Bernstein’s Robin Zhu outlines just how big a threat the app poses to the likes of Facebook, Snapchat, and YouTube. Plus, Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr outlines his concerns about TikTok’s ability to harvest user data. And we ask: how long before this ticking geopolitical time-bomb blows up? 
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer


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    • 38 min
    Money Talks: Is Christmas becoming more efficient?

    Money Talks: Is Christmas becoming more efficient?

    Economists are a gloomy lot, and no less so at Christmas. Whereas most people see gift-giving as a source of joy, economists fret about the potential for misallocated resources. One Scrooge-ish study found that, on average, $100 spent on gifts was worth the same as around $85 of cash spent directly by the recipient. But are there reasons to believe that over time, Christmas is becoming more efficient?
    On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood hear from the father of Scroogenomics, Joel Waldfogel, about why Christmas may be improving for economists—even if it means fewer presents. And they speak to The Economist’s Ore Ogunbiyi about the nightmare after Christmas for retailers.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 39 min

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