81 episodes

One question. One story from Africa for Africa. Alan Kasujja takes a deep dive into the news shaping the continent.

Africa Daily BBC

    • News

One question. One story from Africa for Africa. Alan Kasujja takes a deep dive into the news shaping the continent.

    Why is there a security crisis in Nigeria.

    Why is there a security crisis in Nigeria.

    Increasing incidents of insecurity in Nigeria have led to mounting pressure on President Muhammadu Buhari to take control of the situation. And recently parliament even urged President Buhari to declare a nationwide state of emergency. The country has struggled to end a jihadist insurgency in the north-east now for more than a decade, a conflict that has, according to the Nigerian government and the United Nations, killed tens of thousands of people and forced millions to leave their homes. In south-east Nigeria they’ve seen a surge in deadly attacks targeting police and other security forces in the past few months. All of this has been compounded by a sharp rise in abductions targeting civilians in schools. Alan Kasujja now looks at why there’s a security crisis in Nigeria.

    • 15 min
    What next for the Zulu throne?

    What next for the Zulu throne?

    The Zulu nation is still in shock.

    The death of Queen Shiyiwe Mantfombi Dlamini Zulu caught South Africa by surprise.

    She became leader of the Zulu nation last month, after her husband, King Goodwill Zwelithini, died.

    The Zulu royals have no formal political power, but remain hugely influential figures.

    For that reason, deciding who’s next in line for the throne is actually a big deal.

    Problem is: a bitter family feud has made it hard to guess who’ll succeed Queen Mantfombi.

    So, what happens now?

    Hosted by Alan Kasujja (@Kasujja on Twitter)

    #AfricaDaily

    • 14 min
    Is this the end of Joseph Kony’s LRA?

    Is this the end of Joseph Kony’s LRA?

    Has the LRA finally hit the end of the road?

    The Lord’s Resistance Army was once a force to be reckoned with in northern Uganda.

    But today their forces are depleted and their leader, Joseph Kony, is in hiding.

    On Thursday, one of Kony's top commanders, Dominic Ongwen, will be sentenced by the International Criminal Court.

    And yet, for some people back in Uganda, finding some sense of closure is still proving hard.

    But why? And what happens now to whatever’s left of the LRA?

    Hosted by Alan Kasujja (@Kasujja on Twitter)

    #AfricaDaily

    • 13 min
    Does East Africa need another oil pipeline?

    Does East Africa need another oil pipeline?

    East Africa is not done with oil – not quite yet.

    A major oil pipeline will soon be built across Uganda and Tanzania.

    This could mean good money for both countries, as well as new jobs for people there.

    But activists worry about the impact the project will have on the environment.

    Amid a global climate emergency, they also say it’s misguided to invest in fossil fuels.

    So why does this project matter so much? And how will it affect everyone’s lives?

    Hosted by Alan Kasujja (@Kasujja on Twitter)

    #AfricaDaily

    • 14 min
    Is Ghana the new king of drill music?

    Is Ghana the new king of drill music?

    Red bandanas. Gold chains. Gang signs.

    A new generation of Ghanaian drill artists has taken the music charts by storm.

    Inspired by US drill and UK grime, they created “Asakaa” - Ghana’s fresh take on drill music.

    Their critics say they’re making a cheap replica of American gang culture.

    But on streaming platforms their songs have been played millions of times.

    So what’s behind the rise of this new movement?

    And how did Kumasi, Ghana’s second largest city, came to be at the heart of it all?

    Hosted by Alan Kasujja (@Kasujja on Twitter)

    #AfricaDaily

    • 13 min
    How did potatoes get so expensive in Algeria?

    How did potatoes get so expensive in Algeria?

    Recent images of Algerians queuing up for milk paints a picture of just how difficult it’s become for people trying to get the very basic food staples they rely on. Not just milk but things like chicken, red meat and now even potatoes. Potatoes, once accessible and cheap are now very expensive.
    The country’s concentration on its oil industry has meant it’s not done enough to reduce its reliance on food imports. Algeria imports around 70 per cent of its food requirements. The fall in oil prices and the coronavirus pandemic have just added to the cost of basic food.
    In Africa Daily Alan Kasujja looks at why Algerians are struggling to put food on the table.

    • 12 min

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