Building Empathy in XR, with Tech Trends journalist Alice Bonasio XR for Business

    • Technology

Alan is always ready with an
interesting XR anecdote or two on this podcast, but even he has a
source for interesting XR tidbits. In today's episode, he brings that
source to him - XR journalist and consultant, Alice Bonasio. They end
up chatting about the principles behind the idea that XR is an
"empathy machine."







Alan: Welcome to the XR for
Business Podcast with your host, Alan Smithson. Today's guest is
Alice Bonasio, the technology writer for Inside VR and AR. Alice is a
technology writer/producer/consultant with a particular interest in
the immersive space. Over the past 15 years, she's combined a career
in freelance journalism, contributing to outlets such as Wired,
Quartz, Fast Company, Playboy, Upload VR, Ars Technica and many
others. She's advised a broad range of companies, from startups to
major corporations on their communications and digital strategy.
She's currently the editor-in-chief of Tech Trends, a news and
opinion website she founded in 2016, and the curator of the daily
Inside VR and AR newsletter, which I personally read every single
day. You can connect with Alice on LinkedIn and you can also reach
her at Twitter on Alice Bonasio. And if you want to subscribe to
Inside VR, it's inside.com/vr and
inside.com/ar.




Alice, welcome to the show.



Alice: Hello. Very nice to meet
you. Thanks for inviting me on.



Alan: It's my absolute pleasure.
I read your content daily, so it's a real pleasure for me to have you
on the show. Every day I get this Inside VR, and I skim through it, I
look for the things that are business related. And at the bottom, it
says "curated by Alice." And I was like, I got to have her
on the show. So thank you so much.



Alice: You're very, very
welcome.



Alan: You are my source for
news.



Alice: [laughs] That's very nice
to know. Yes. And the more subscribers we get, the more I get to do
what I love, which is trawling through all of those interesting bits
of news. So, yeah, definitely get everyone to subscribe. That'll be
great.



Alan: Well, I know one way to
get more subscribers, we should write a piece about this amazing
new podcast called the XR for Business Podcast.



Alice: Ah, yes, yes. That's how
you make a great plug. Yeah, yeah. We're pros here, we're pros.



Alan: So I want to dive in here
because there's so much to get in. We've got an hour, let's really
make the best of it. Let's start with one or two things that you've
seen in the last little bit that just blew your mind, because I think
you get to see everything from a 10,000 foot view. What is personally
blowning your mind in XR for business?



Alice: I think one of the recent
examples -- and you were talking about it when you were saying about
doing your news roundup -- in the last week was really that Microsoft
demo at Inspire. That really did blow my mind. And it's one of those
things where you see several elements just come together into
something that just makes such sense. And it was one of those eureka
moments. Together with mapping, I think that translation is just such
an obvious use case for augmented or mixed reality, but it is also
one of the most difficult ones to get right, because you just need a
lot of elements to be at the optimum stage and to come together for
the experience to work. And the experience either really works well
or doesn't. So what they did was, at Microsoft Inspire -- which is a
partner conference for Microsoft -- Julia White, who is an executive
for Azure, came on stage and they did this demo where she conjured up
a little hologram at first, and then the hologram became a full-size
replica, doppelganger of herself on stag

Alan is always ready with an
interesting XR anecdote or two on this podcast, but even he has a
source for interesting XR tidbits. In today's episode, he brings that
source to him - XR journalist and consultant, Alice Bonasio. They end
up chatting about the principles behind the idea that XR is an
"empathy machine."







Alan: Welcome to the XR for
Business Podcast with your host, Alan Smithson. Today's guest is
Alice Bonasio, the technology writer for Inside VR and AR. Alice is a
technology writer/producer/consultant with a particular interest in
the immersive space. Over the past 15 years, she's combined a career
in freelance journalism, contributing to outlets such as Wired,
Quartz, Fast Company, Playboy, Upload VR, Ars Technica and many
others. She's advised a broad range of companies, from startups to
major corporations on their communications and digital strategy.
She's currently the editor-in-chief of Tech Trends, a news and
opinion website she founded in 2016, and the curator of the daily
Inside VR and AR newsletter, which I personally read every single
day. You can connect with Alice on LinkedIn and you can also reach
her at Twitter on Alice Bonasio. And if you want to subscribe to
Inside VR, it's inside.com/vr and
inside.com/ar.




Alice, welcome to the show.



Alice: Hello. Very nice to meet
you. Thanks for inviting me on.



Alan: It's my absolute pleasure.
I read your content daily, so it's a real pleasure for me to have you
on the show. Every day I get this Inside VR, and I skim through it, I
look for the things that are business related. And at the bottom, it
says "curated by Alice." And I was like, I got to have her
on the show. So thank you so much.



Alice: You're very, very
welcome.



Alan: You are my source for
news.



Alice: [laughs] That's very nice
to know. Yes. And the more subscribers we get, the more I get to do
what I love, which is trawling through all of those interesting bits
of news. So, yeah, definitely get everyone to subscribe. That'll be
great.



Alan: Well, I know one way to
get more subscribers, we should write a piece about this amazing
new podcast called the XR for Business Podcast.



Alice: Ah, yes, yes. That's how
you make a great plug. Yeah, yeah. We're pros here, we're pros.



Alan: So I want to dive in here
because there's so much to get in. We've got an hour, let's really
make the best of it. Let's start with one or two things that you've
seen in the last little bit that just blew your mind, because I think
you get to see everything from a 10,000 foot view. What is personally
blowning your mind in XR for business?



Alice: I think one of the recent
examples -- and you were talking about it when you were saying about
doing your news roundup -- in the last week was really that Microsoft
demo at Inspire. That really did blow my mind. And it's one of those
things where you see several elements just come together into
something that just makes such sense. And it was one of those eureka
moments. Together with mapping, I think that translation is just such
an obvious use case for augmented or mixed reality, but it is also
one of the most difficult ones to get right, because you just need a
lot of elements to be at the optimum stage and to come together for
the experience to work. And the experience either really works well
or doesn't. So what they did was, at Microsoft Inspire -- which is a
partner conference for Microsoft -- Julia White, who is an executive
for Azure, came on stage and they did this demo where she conjured up
a little hologram at first, and then the hologram became a full-size
replica, doppelganger of herself on stag

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