15 episodios

Ancient Maya civilization flourished long ago in what is now southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, and El Salvador. Their distinctive culture gave rise to major cities by 500 BCE. For the next two thousand years, the Maya ruled this area, an independence that ended only with the Spanish Conquest of the New World.

The 9th and 10th centuries CE saw a dramatic decline in population in cities that had once been the Maya heartland. Each city faced unique problems including drought, warfare, soil exhaustion, and overpopulation. However, the Maya did not disappear. People of Maya descent, speaking a range of Mayan languages, some using aspects of the ancient Maya Calendar, live today in many parts of Mexico and Central America.

Online, in movies, on television, and in print, news has been spreading that a world-transforming apocalypse will happen in December 2012. In recent years, some have claimed that this cataclysmic event was foretold centuries ago in the calendar of the ancient Maya. Beliefs about the exact nature of this cataclysm vary. Some believe that a celestial alignment will bring a series of devastating natural disasters. Others argue that this event will bring enlightenment and a new age of peace. As this date draws closer, new predictions continue to emerge. But what did the Maya really believe?

MAYA 2012: Lords of Time University of Pennsylvania

    • Historia

Ancient Maya civilization flourished long ago in what is now southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, and El Salvador. Their distinctive culture gave rise to major cities by 500 BCE. For the next two thousand years, the Maya ruled this area, an independence that ended only with the Spanish Conquest of the New World.

The 9th and 10th centuries CE saw a dramatic decline in population in cities that had once been the Maya heartland. Each city faced unique problems including drought, warfare, soil exhaustion, and overpopulation. However, the Maya did not disappear. People of Maya descent, speaking a range of Mayan languages, some using aspects of the ancient Maya Calendar, live today in many parts of Mexico and Central America.

Online, in movies, on television, and in print, news has been spreading that a world-transforming apocalypse will happen in December 2012. In recent years, some have claimed that this cataclysmic event was foretold centuries ago in the calendar of the ancient Maya. Beliefs about the exact nature of this cataclysm vary. Some believe that a celestial alignment will bring a series of devastating natural disasters. Others argue that this event will bring enlightenment and a new age of peace. As this date draws closer, new predictions continue to emerge. But what did the Maya really believe?

    • video
    MAYA 2012: Lords of Time (Extended Introduction!)

    MAYA 2012: Lords of Time (Extended Introduction!)

    Watch this video for an extended introduction to the landmark Penn Museum exhibit "Maya 2012: Lords of Time" by exhibit developers, Kevin Schott and Allie Francies, and curator, Simon Martin.

    • 1m
    • video
    Behind the Scenes of MAYA.2012 - The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan

    Behind the Scenes of MAYA.2012 - The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan

    The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan is an eight foot wide narrative-oriented "map" that tells the story of the 16th century conquest of Maya land by the Quauhquechollan and Spanish conquistadores. A replica of the Lienzo is a highlight of the Maya.2012 exhibit. Get a sneak peek of the highly detailed canvas mural with exhibit developer Kevin Schott.

    • 2 min
    • video
    Behind the Scenes of MAYA 2012 - Timeline

    Behind the Scenes of MAYA 2012 - Timeline

    4000 years of Maya history in 25 feet?

    See it to believe it.

    • 57 segundos
    • video
    MAYA 2012: Human Sacrifice and the Ancient Maya

    MAYA 2012: Human Sacrifice and the Ancient Maya

    Dr. Loa Traxler explains the ancient Maya's ritual of human sacrifice and blood-letting and how contemporary media has skewed our perception of a ritual common across many ancient cultures.

    • 2 min
    Interaction in the Ancient Maya World Perspectives from the Late Pre-Classic and Late Post-Classic Periods

    Interaction in the Ancient Maya World Perspectives from the Late Pre-Classic and Late Post-Classic Periods

    Jerry Sabloff, University of Pennsylvania Professor, presents "Interaction in the Ancient Maya World Perspectives from the Late Pre-Classic and Late Post-Classic Periods".

    Penn Museum's Maya Weekend is one of the largest and oldest meetings in the United States devoted to Maya studies. 2010 brings together international scholars, speakers of Mayan descent, weavers, conservationists, and others actively involved with traditional Maya communities within Central America, for an engaging look at the daily life of Maya women, and their roles in religion, politics, and the community.

    • 26 min
    Women in Stone: Understanding Classic Period Maya Female Ajaws

    Women in Stone: Understanding Classic Period Maya Female Ajaws

    University of Pennsylvania's doctoral student in the anthropology department Sarah Kurnick gives the paper "Women in Stone: Understanding Classic Period Maya Female Ajaws." She is studying Maya archaeology and is currently conducting dissertation research in the Mopan Valley of Belize. She has also done field work along the Pacific coast of Guatemala and in Yucatán, Mexico. The Classic period Maya created a number of monuments depicting politically powerful women. Notably, a handful of these monuments depict not just politically powerful women, but female ajaws, or female divine rulers. Her presentation took a closer look at the Classic period Maya female ajaws and their representations on monuments – topics that have attracted the attention of only a few archaeologists. In particular, it considered how the female ajaws acquired their authority; how they transferred their authority to their successors; and how they chose to portray themselves on monuments as a means of maintaining their authority during their reigns.

    • 32 min

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