21 episodios

Tracing the histories of antiquities and landmarks that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria, India and Pakistan.

Museum of Lost Objects BBC

    • Sociedad y cultura

Tracing the histories of antiquities and landmarks that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria, India and Pakistan.

    The Fire That Scorched Brazil’s History

    The Fire That Scorched Brazil’s History

    It’s been a year since Brazil’s National Museum burned down in a fire. Not only was its collection one of the most extraordinary in the world, but Brazil’s entire history ran through the museum. On the second floor you could meet the prehistoric skeleton that was the ‘mother’ of all Brazilians; on the third, listen to Amazonian folklore about exploding jaguars; and downstairs, slide into the slippers of a slave king. Now, the only intact artefact on site is a huge iron rock from outer space – the Bendego meteorite.

    The National Museum and its precious archive of Brazil’s past may be in ruins, but amongst the ashes there’s a battle to revive it.

    Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
    Producer: Maryam Maruf

    With thanks to Roberta Fortuna

    Contributors: Cahe Rodrigues, carnival director; Dom João, photographer and descendent of Brazil’s last emperor; Laurentino Gomes, journalist and author; Monica Lima, historian; Mariza Carvalho Soares, historian and museum curator; Aparecida Vilaça, anthropologist and author of Paletó and Me; Bernabau Tikuna, linguist; Tonico Benetiz, anthropologist; Murilo Bastos, bio-archaeologist; Luciana Carvalho, paleontologist and deputy director of rescue Museu Nacional; Sergio Azevedo, paleontologist and director of Museu Nacional’s 3D printing lab

    Voice over performances by: Fernando Duarte, Marco Silva, Silvia Salek; Thomas Pappon

    Picture: Brazil’s National Museum – or Museu Nacional – on fire September, 2018
    Credit: Getty Images

    This edition of Museum of Lost Objects is broadcast on BBC World Service.

    • 57 min
    Tagore’s Nobel Prize Theft

    Tagore’s Nobel Prize Theft

    Rabindranath Tagore, the celebrated Bengali writer, is one of the greatest figures in modern South Asian history. In 1913, Tagore became the first non-westerner to win a Nobel Prize, but just over a decade ago, his Nobel medal was stolen – and still hasn’t been found. This episode looks at Tagore’s legacy, how his songs and poems are ubiquitous in Bengali life, how he inspired revolutionaries and reformers in South Asia, and how his suspicion of all nationalisms - even anti-colonial nationalism - makes his work feel thoroughly contemporary and relevant today.



    Presented by Kanishk Tharoor

    Produced by Maryam Maruf



    Contributors: Arunava Sinha; Rahul Tandon; and Saroj Mukherji



    With thanks to Minu Tharoor; CS Mukherji; and Sudeshna Guha



    Image: An unseen vendor picks up a cut out photo of Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore

    Credit: Getty Images

    • 16 min
    Jinnah’s Last Home

    Jinnah’s Last Home

    Ziarat Residency was a former sanatorium in the hills of Balochistan, and it’s where Muhammad Ali Jinnah - the founder of Pakistan – spent the last three months of his life. The building acquired great significance after his death – it was even on the 100 rupee note, and was eventually turned into a museum. But just four years ago, Ziarat residency was fire-bombed and burnt to the ground by Balochi separatists.



    Presented by Kanishk Tharoor

    Produced by Maryam Maruf



    Contributors: Nayyar Ali Dada; Saher Baloch; Ayesha Jalal, Tufts University; Pasha Haroon;



    With thanks to Fifi Haroon



    Image: Rebuilt Ziarat Residency after 2013

    Credit: Nayyar Ali Dada Associates

    • 18 min
    Delhi’s Stolen Seat of Power

    Delhi’s Stolen Seat of Power

    In March 1739, the Persian warlord Nader Shah laid siege to Delhi. He destroyed and plundered the city. Among his ‘Delhi loot’ was the famous Jeweled or Peacock Throne of the Mughal Empire. It took seven years to make, and seven elephants to cart it away forever - and it's been lost ever since. This episode stretches back to stories of empire well before British rule, and looks at how narratives of conquest and loss still have a powerful hold over South Asians.



    Presented by Kanishk Tharoor

    Produced by Maryam Maruf



    Contributors: Yuthika Sharma, University of Edinburgh; and Manan Ahmed, Columbia University



    With thanks to Sussan Babaie, Courtauld Institute of Art



    Image: Persian ruler Nadir Shah on the Peacock Throne after his victory over the Mughals Credit: Alamy

    • 13 min
    The Keeper of Buddha's Bones

    The Keeper of Buddha's Bones

    The mystery of the 2,000 year old little bronze box, the Kanishka casket, that was said to hold the remains of the Buddha himself.



    Presented by Kanishk Tharoor

    Produced by Maryam Maruf



    Contributor: Vazira Fazila-Yacoubali Zamindar, Brown University



    Picture: Replica of the Kanishka casket at the British Museum

    Credit: BBC

    • 14 min
    The Cricketer Who Lost His Team

    The Cricketer Who Lost His Team

    Bonus pod! Amir Elahi, the great uncle of Columbia University historian Manan Ahmed, became rivals with his former Indian teammates when he left for Pakistan.



    Image: Amir Elahi and Dattaram Hindlekar, members of the All-India cricket team, 1936

    Credit: Getty Images

    • 3 min

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