95 episodios

Outside In explores how the world is changing and how business is changing with it. Host Charles Trevail interviews executives, journalists, authors, and thinkers, exploring the customer-centric strategies and philosophies that are working successfully inside companies, and the consumer trends, industry disruptions, and cultural forces that are influencing business from the outside.

Outside In with Charles Trevail C Space

    • Economía y empresa

Outside In explores how the world is changing and how business is changing with it. Host Charles Trevail interviews executives, journalists, authors, and thinkers, exploring the customer-centric strategies and philosophies that are working successfully inside companies, and the consumer trends, industry disruptions, and cultural forces that are influencing business from the outside.

    Scott Uzzell, CEO, Converse: Leading and Listening During a Pivotal Moment

    Scott Uzzell, CEO, Converse: Leading and Listening During a Pivotal Moment

    The importance of this moment isn’t lost on Scott Uzzell, the CEO of Converse. “How do I bring the unique experiences of being a Black man in America to help people around me, other executives, society, the consumers that care about and love our brand...to make us better?” Uzzell also recognizes that, as the CEO of a global brand, he has a responsibility to listen and learn from others from diverse backgrounds with different perspectives -- and then, take bold action to create a more diverse and inclusive culture inside Converse and fight injustice and inequality outside of it. Uzzell joins the podcast to talk about what this moment means for him, what he’s learned while leading his company through unprecedented change, and why he thinks we’re about to see way more progress than we've seen before.

    Listen to this podcast to learn:
    • Why the urgency of this moment demands that all CEOs “get off the couch” and do something

    • What Uzzell learned about being “color brave” from Mellody Hobson, Vice Chair of the Board of Starbucks

    • Why companies must confront and address tough political and racial issues

    • How influencers help shape the Converse brand in local markets and inspire product innovation

    • Why the original basketball sneaker is returning to the NBA -- and aligning with creatively-driven athletes like Draymond Green and Kelly Oubre Jr.

    • The effects Covid-19 has had on the business and why Uzzell is optimistic about the future

    • 22 min
    Ravi Dhar, Yale School of Management: A Shift Towards Forward-Looking Insights

    Ravi Dhar, Yale School of Management: A Shift Towards Forward-Looking Insights

    For decades, market research was considered an “auditing function” -- a department inside the business that looks backwards at an ad campaign or a product, and identifies all the reasons why it performed either well or poorly. But as organic growth became more important to a company’s success, market research transformed into a forward-looking insights function. “You can't have organic growth unless you understand your customers,” says Ravi Dhar, professor at Yale School of Management and Director of Yale’s Center for Customer Insights. He joins the podcast to talk about the evolution and role of insights and how to fix the tension that exists between insights departments and the C-suite.

    Listen to this podcast to learn:
    • The four stages of insights, based on Ravi’s research with Boston Consulting Group

    • Why insights leaders should be in the room when strategic decisions are being made

    • Changes in consumer behavior during the pandemic, and which new behaviors might persist

    • The effects that two concepts -- “out of sight, out of mind” and “absence makes the heart grow fonder” -- could have on consumer demand after the pandemic subsides

    • The inherent risk in looking to “consumers as scientists”

    • Why insights require a collaboration of analytics, anthropology, and psychology

    • The skills you need to become a successful insights professional now and in the future

    For more information: https://som.yale.edu/faculty/ravi-dhar

    • 25 min
    Nicholas Thompson, Editor-in-Chief, WIRED: The Big Questions Ahead of Us

    Nicholas Thompson, Editor-in-Chief, WIRED: The Big Questions Ahead of Us

    Nicholas Thompson once wrote that WIRED’s purview is the future and that “the only way to think creatively about the future is with something like optimism.” But it’s hard to think optimistically right now. Our old ways of living have been fundamentally altered -- and may never return. Nicholas joins the podcast to talk about the profound changes we’re all living through and the broad implications this pandemic will have for society, businesses, technology, governments, and our environment.

    Listen to this podcast episode to learn:

    • Reasons to feel optimistic about our future (and challenges that will need to be solved)

    • People’s perceptions of and attitudes towards Big Tech during this crisis

    • The perilous state of data privacy when our health is on the line

    • Are we experiencing a “work from home bubble” and overestimating the value of remote work?

    • Whether the environmental movement may lose momentum in the years ahead

    • How technologies like AI and blockchain may help build stronger governments and smarter policy

    • Why coronavirus has been bad for (poorly run) democracies

    For more info: www.nickthompson.com

    • 27 min
    Mathew Sweezey: Contextual Marketing in an Infinite Media World

    Mathew Sweezey: Contextual Marketing in an Infinite Media World

    Mathew Sweezey is a marketing futurist for Salesforce. Based on his research, he discovered that June 24, 2009, was a tipping point for media and marketing. That’s the day consumers officially overtook brands and businesses as the dominant media creators. Since then, an infinite and uncontrollable stream of noise -- tweets, Facebook updates, texts, blog posts, Amazon reviews -- has been the foundation of the new media environment. It has inspired new consumer behaviors and forced marketers to play by new rules. Matt joins the podcast to talk about his new book, Context Marketing Revolution: How to Motivate Buyers in the Age of Infinite Media, and why brands can no longer simply force messaging into the marketplace and expect that will be enough to persuade people to buy. Instead, brands must now market with context in mind and co-create with the very people who create and consume.

    Listen to this podcast episode to learn:

    • What is contextual marketing and how does it differ from what has worked in the past?

    • How brands have shifted to a new business model of “market, sell, build, market”

    • Mercedes vs. Tesla: two starkly different approaches to marketing

    • How high-performing brands like Oreo have co-created with the marketplace to establish demand for new products before they launch

    • How LEGO designed around the context of people’s holiday shopping pains in order to boost online sales

    • The downside of A/B testing

    • How companies like Room and Board use AI to create “headless commerce”

    • What’s next in marketing as AI, video, and voice take center stage

    For more information: mathewsweezey.com

    • 22 min
    Bill Walshe, CEO, Viceroy Hotel Group: What People Want From a Luxury Experience

    Bill Walshe, CEO, Viceroy Hotel Group: What People Want From a Luxury Experience

    In luxury, “cookie cutter” doesn’t cut it. And for a luxury hotel brand, it has to strike a delicate balance between delivering a guest experience that’s both consistent and one-of-a-kind. Bill Walshe, CEO at Viceroy Hotel Group, says that consistency shouldn’t stifle the things that guests remember: spontaneity, authenticity, individuality, and creativity. He calls his philosophy “consistent individuality.” Viceroy Hotel Group maintains 15 properties around the world, from St. Lucia to Los Cabos to Beverly Hills and beyond, with another 8 soon to enter the brand’s portfolio. Each maintains its own distinct sense of location and destination while also sharing Viceroy’s brand essence. Walshe joins the podcast to give his take on what luxury means in the service industry today, and how Viceroy designs its experience around changing guest preferences, new technologies, brand partnerships, and shared values.

    Listen to this podcast episode to learn:

    • Why hotels aren’t just service providers; they’re content providers with Instagrammable moments in mind

    • From celebrity chefs to spin studios, how the right brand partnerships and alliances add value to the guest experience and future-proof the business

    • Why guests want to stay at hotels where they feel they're making a positive impact on the world through a “contribution without compromise”

    • Why Viceroy decided to open the first-ever hotel designed around celebrating female achievement and empowerment (Hotel Zena in Washington, DC)

    • Is luxury’s assumed exclusivity a “historically passé” notion?

    • 22 min
    Amy Edmondson: Creating Psychological Safety at Work

    Amy Edmondson: Creating Psychological Safety at Work

    When Google embarked on an extensive study to understand what makes for a high-performing team, it was Amy Edmondson’s research on “psychological safety” that became the foundation of the company’s findings. Edmondson, a Harvard Business School professor and organizational behavior expert, joins the podcast to talk about her latest book, The Fearless Organization. She says that “psychological safety describes a climate at work where one believes that you can freely speak up with any idea, concern, question, even mistakes.” It’s “a sense of permission for candor.” She explains the benefits of creating psychological safety in the workplace and why it’s essential for learning, innovation, and growth in the knowledge economy.

    Listen to this podcast episode to learn:

    • Do better teams make fewer mistakes, or are they more willing to talk about them?

    • Why “problems are gems” and how leaders can use mistakes to improve performance

    • Why customer truths don’t always tend to make it up the corporate hierarchy

    • Differences between the “comfort zone” and the “anxiety zone” at work, and why the latter is more dangerous

    • Misconceptions about what psychological safety is (and what it isn’t)

    • Actions we can all take to create greater psychological safety at work and in our personal lives

    • 27 min

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