100 episodios

Hi, I'm Nancy Buswell and I've been teaching people how to improve their English for over 16 years! I'm an American who teaches in a university in southern China. The Ten Questions ESL (English as a Second Language) Podcast is for people around the world who want to improve their English listening comprehension and English accent (intonation). I produce two kinds of podcast episodes. 1) TQ: My original idea was the Ten Questions ESL Podcast. I interview native and non-native English speakers and ask them the same ten questions. You can practice your listening comprehension and learn about other people and other cultures at the same time. 2) LnR: These podcasts are for people who want to improve their intonation and pronunciation. I say a sentence or phrase and you can repeat after me. The LnR podcasts with even numbers (such as 042, 044) have dialogues that I write that use informal speech, that is, the kind of language that friends use with each other. The LnR podcasts with odd numbers (such as 043, 045) use selections from novels, poems or speeches. In December I simplified my podcasts and stopped making the Sun3 episodes, and changed LnR into two kinds: formal and informal language. I'm just one person doing all of this,because I like podcasts and I love helping people to improve their English. My goal is that my podcasts will help individuals around the world as well as English teachers around the world. If you are an English teacher, please share these with your students and/or use them in class. If you are an English-language learner, please share these with your friends, classmates and teachers.

Ten Questions ESL Podcast Nancy Buswell

    • Aprendizaje de idiomas
    • 3.0, 1 valoración

Hi, I'm Nancy Buswell and I've been teaching people how to improve their English for over 16 years! I'm an American who teaches in a university in southern China. The Ten Questions ESL (English as a Second Language) Podcast is for people around the world who want to improve their English listening comprehension and English accent (intonation). I produce two kinds of podcast episodes. 1) TQ: My original idea was the Ten Questions ESL Podcast. I interview native and non-native English speakers and ask them the same ten questions. You can practice your listening comprehension and learn about other people and other cultures at the same time. 2) LnR: These podcasts are for people who want to improve their intonation and pronunciation. I say a sentence or phrase and you can repeat after me. The LnR podcasts with even numbers (such as 042, 044) have dialogues that I write that use informal speech, that is, the kind of language that friends use with each other. The LnR podcasts with odd numbers (such as 043, 045) use selections from novels, poems or speeches. In December I simplified my podcasts and stopped making the Sun3 episodes, and changed LnR into two kinds: formal and informal language. I'm just one person doing all of this,because I like podcasts and I love helping people to improve their English. My goal is that my podcasts will help individuals around the world as well as English teachers around the world. If you are an English teacher, please share these with your students and/or use them in class. If you are an English-language learner, please share these with your friends, classmates and teachers.

    LnR 126 (Casual Language) Driving (Replay)

    LnR 126 (Casual Language) Driving (Replay)

    Hi! This episode is almost three years old. I talk about how I enjoy driving when I'm home for the summer. Of course, things have changed, and now I live at home all the time. I haven't been doing much driving, though, because of the pandemic. I teach English online (Cambly, PalFish, Kouyuxia, and now Amazing Talker) and am just about to launch (that's business vocabulary for "start") a course on how to teach IELTS speaking. If you are an English teacher who is interested in learning how to teach IELTS, contact me at nancy@missbuswell.com for more information. My course is not cheap, but it's not expensive, either. Best wishes to all of you during this COVID-19 time. I hope that you and your family are all well.
     
    LnR 126 (Casual Language) Driving
    The word I couldn't spell is "demographics"! Dictionary.com says: " the statistical data of a population, especially those showing average age, income, education, etc."
    A: Hi, Nancy! Are you having a good time at home?
    B: Oh, yeah. It's great to be home. I love spending time with my mom and her cats. I like being in my country again, of course, and I like driving.
    A: Driving? Really?
    B: Yeah, I don't drive in China because I don't need to. Plus, I don't have enough money to buy a car, and it's hard for a foreigner to get a driver's license.
    A: Ah, makes sense. Is it strange to drive again?
    B: No, it feels natural. Like a lot of Americans, I've been driving since I was 16.
    A: Did you take Driver's Ed in high school?
    B: No, my dad taught me to drive. My sister also helped me. My high school had Driver's Ed as a summer school class, but I didn't take it. I think it's more common now to take Driver's Ed at school. I think the parents get a discount on their car insurance if their teenage children pass the class.
    A: When did you get your first car?
    B: I drove my parents' cars when I needed to. I didn't have my own car in high school or college.
    A: Were you from a poor family? Oh, maybe that's a personal question!
    B: No problem. No, we were middle class, but with four children Mom and Dad couldn't buy us everything we wanted. We had everything we needed, though, and that's what's important. I bought my own car when I started teaching.

    • 16 min
    LnR 124 (Casual Language) Summer Vacation (Replay)

    LnR 124 (Casual Language) Summer Vacation (Replay)

    Hi! This podcast episode is from almost three years ago. I made it in July in China, which is why it's about the summertime. Now, in 2020, it's early May and of course I live in the U.S. now. And things are very different than they were three years ago! I am doing well because I live in a small town, with few or no active cases of COVID-19. There are many other places in my country and around the world where people are still struggling against this illness. I hope that you and your family are doing well, wherever you are. I was listening to this recording a few minutes ago. There's a lot of good information in this episode, but I think I may have talked too much! So sorry!
    LnR 124 (Casual Language) Summer Vacation
    A: What are you doing for your summer break?
    B: Well, for my summer vacation I'll be an intern at a local company. I'll get some practical experience to go with all the things I've learned in class.
    A: Will you get paid?
    B: No, darn it. It's hard to find a paid internship nowadays. What will you do during your summer holiday?
    A: As you know, I failed my world history class. I don't like history as much as I like my other subjects, so I slacked off on studying for it and ended up failing the class. My parents said I had to take it again during the first summer school term.
    B: Oh, that's too bad.
    A: Yeah, what a bummer. It's only for six weeks, but I've got class for four hours a day. That'll be hard.
    B: Drink lots of coffee! Or Cokes.
    A: Yeah, I'll have to do something to stay awake. At least I have free time when the first summer semester ends. I'm going to spend that time relaxing at the local pool, until my family takes our annual summer vacation to California to see Grandma and Grandpa.
    B: Sounds like a busy summer for you.
    A: And sounds like a useful summer for you. I hope you learn a lot at your internship.
    B: And I hope you learn a lot in your World History class.
    A: Yeah, right.

    • 20 min
    LnR 122 (Casual Language) Insomnia (Replay)

    LnR 122 (Casual Language) Insomnia (Replay)

    Hi! Like most smart Americans, I'm staying at home most of the time, just going out to run errands for my mother or go shopping. I live in a small town that has only had five cases of COVID-19. I wear a mask when I go out, but most people don't. I want to be extra-careful because I live with my mother, who is 84. Today's podcast episode is from 2 1/2 years ago, talking about when I went home for the summer. Of course, my life is different now. I live at home full time!
    LnR 122 (Casual Language) Insomnia
    A: Hey, are you OK?
    B: Yeah, so-so. I'm having trouble sleeping.
    A: Oh, I've had insomnia before. It wasn't fun.
    B: I seldom have insomnia. I mainly get it if I'm worried about something or if I've had too much caffeine.
    A: Yeah, I get it when I'm worried or have a lot of stress. So why do you have it now?
    B: Actually, it's jet lag, not true insomnia. I arrived from China three days ago and still haven't adapted to the time zone here. I can't get to sleep until very early in the morning, and then I’m so tired that I take a long nap in the afternoon. Which, of course, makes it harder to get to sleep at night. It's a vicious circle.
    A: Oh, I see. That's too bad. But you'll get over it soon, right?
    B: Yeah, in a few days. I'm glad to be back, though. It's always good to be home.
    A: What do you miss the most when you're in China? Your mother?
    B: I call my mother twice a week, so I can't really say that I miss her. What I miss the most are milkshakes and Mexican food. And driving. I really enjoy driving when I'm back home.
    A: You don't drive in China?
    B: Are you kidding!? First of all, I don't have enough money for a car. Second, I don't need a car because I live on campus and almost everything I need is close to me. And finally, I'd be too afraid to drive in China!
    A: But you drove when you lived in Mexico.
    B: I was younger then. I'm not as brave now.

    • 18 min
    LnR 120 (Casual Language) Heads up! (Replay)

    LnR 120 (Casual Language) Heads up! (Replay)

    Hi! This podcast episode is from 2 1/2 years ago, when I was still teaching in China. I've been back in the U.S. for almost a year and a half now, teaching online. If you want to talk with me, go to Cambly and sign up for a free trial. On Cambly I specialize in free talk and in IELTS preparation. Here in the U.S. most people are staying home, if they can, because of the coronovirus pandemic. It's very still very serious in many parts of the world, though the good news is that it seems like China is starting to get back to normal. I hope we can all get back to normal soon. I live in a small town, where we have only three cases of COVID-19. I go out once a week to go grocery shopping. Otherwise, I stay at home like we are supposed to. Best wishes to all my listeners, for health and happiness in this difficult time.
    -----------
    LnR 120 (Casual Language) Heads up!
    A: Wow, that's amazing! I've never seen a double rainbow before.
    B: It's a first for me, too. That's why I sent messages to you and my other neighbors.
    A: Yeah, thanks for the heads up, Nancy. I think I've got some good shots of it.
    B: Great. I know you like to take pictures and play around with photo-editing software.
    A: Yeah, I use a free online one now, but I want to buy Photoshop soon. Say, how are your classes going?
    B: I'm almost finished for the term. I just have to give some oral English exams in a couple of days.
    A: Lucky.  I've got lots of papers to grade, and then final exams. Speaking of papers, I'd better get back to work.
    B: OK. Hey, heads up! A car's coming!
    A: Oh, wow, thanks! I didn't see it.

    • 12 min
    LnR 118 (Casual Language) Side Hustle (Replay)

    LnR 118 (Casual Language) Side Hustle (Replay)

    LnR 118 (Casual Language) Side Hustle (Replay)
    Hi, I hope that everyone is doing well. The U.S. is finally getting serious about trying to stop the spread of the coronavirus in the country. We are supposed to stay at home if we can. I'm in a small town, so we aren't very worried about it, though we are being careful. Other places in the country have more cases of the virus and are facing stricter rules about staying inside. I know that my listeners in other countries, particularly in Europe and Asia, have already faced many problems because of the virus. I wish all of you the best. This podcast episode is about having a "side hustle". Right now I am working on several side hustles, mainly involving selling online and writing ebooks. A couple years ago I tried selling bookmarks on Amazon. It was an interesting learning experience, but it was also a failure! I learned how to contact a Chinese company to make the kind of bookmark I wanted. That was good. But losing money because no one bought the bookmarks on Amazon was not good. I should have done more research before I chose that product. I liked giving bookmarks as a gift, so I thought other people did, too. Anyhow, I have boxes of unsold bookmarks under the bed in the guest bedroom of my mother's house, where I live. If you are thinking of doing a side hustle or two or three, I encourage you! Be sure to do enough research before you start, though. I learned the hard way! From Nancy at nancy@missbuswell.com.
     
    LnR 118 (Casual Language) Side Hustle
    A: Hey, do you want to go see a movie tonight?
    B: Nah, I want to work on my side hustle.
    A: Your what? What do you mean?
    B: My side hustle. It means a part-time job, in addition to your full-time job. Usually it means starting an online business.
    A: Oh, really. I've never heard that expression before. I guess I could say that I have a side hustle, too. I’m writing a short ebook about how to take care of hamsters. I love hamsters and know a lot about them. I’m going to publish the ebook on Amazon Kindle.
    B: That sounds great. My side hustle is selling things online. I’m actually still doing research on the best way for me to do it.
    A: I've heard you can make a lot of money as an affiliate seller.
    B: What's that?
    A: That's when you sell someone else's product, usually on your own website. You get a percentage of the sales price. You can sell real products, like things on Amazon, or digital products, like computer programs or online courses.
    B: Wow, I need to do some more research! Thanks for telling me.

    • 11 min
    LnR 116 (Casual Language) Desert/Dessert (Replay)

    LnR 116 (Casual Language) Desert/Dessert (Replay)

    LnR 116 (Casual Language) Desert/Dessert  (Replay from 2 1/2 years ago)       
    A: Teacher, how to pronounce this word?
    B: This one, with two s's, is pronounced "dessert". It means sweet food after dinner.
    A: Oh, like ice cream or chocolate cake?
    B: Exactly. As a matter of fact, that's what we usually had for dessert when I was growing up. Though sometimes Mom made us have fruit instead of cake or ice cream.
    A: And what about this word?
    B: It's pronounced "desert". Like the Sahara Desert in northern Africa. Are there any deserts in your country?
    A: No, but we have lots of hills and mountains.
    B: That's nice. By the way, please don't call me "Teacher". Use my name, Miss Buswell. But don't call me only "Buswell", because it's not nice to call a lady only by her last name.
    A: Oh, I didn't know that. In my language, we call our teachers "teacher" or "professor".
    B: Oh, I see. Also, it's bad grammar to say, "How to pronounce." You should say, "How do you pronounce".
    A: OK, thanks. I learned a lot with this question!

    • 10 min

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