300 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • Daily News
    • 4.9, 208 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Fate of Trump's Financial Records

    The Fate of Trump's Financial Records

    The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that President Trump cannot block the release of his financial records. Today, we hear the story behind the cases the justices heard — and the meaning of their decisions.

    Guests: David Enrich, the business investigations editor for The New York Times and Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: The Court cleared the way for prosecutors in New York to seek President Trump’s financial records — but stopped Congress from accessing the records by subpoena for now.Our chief White House correspondent writes that the Supreme Court affirmed the power of judicial independence by dismissing President Trump’s claims of immunity.

    • 25 min
    A Missed Warning About Silent Coronavirus Infections

    A Missed Warning About Silent Coronavirus Infections

    At the end of January, long before the world understood that seemingly healthy people could spread the coronavirus, a doctor in Germany tried to sound the alarm. Today, we look at why that warning was unwelcome.

    Guests: Matt Apuzzo, an investigative reporter for The New York Times based in Brussels.

    Dr. Camilla Rothe, an infectious disease specialist at Munich University Hospital.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: At the end of March, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that as many as 25 percent of those infected by the coronavirus may not show symptoms.Some scientists have criticized the World Health Organization over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic, saying its statements and advice sometimes lag behind research.

    • 30 min
    Counting the Infected

    Counting the Infected

    For months, the U.S. government has been quietly collecting information on hundreds of thousands of coronavirus cases across the country. Today, we tell the story of how The Times got hold of that data, and what it says about the nation’s outbreak.

    Plus: a conversation with three U.S. astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

    Guests: Robert Gebeloff, a reporter for The New York Times specializing in data analysis.

    Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley and Chris Cassidy, NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: The C.D.C. figures provide the fullest and most extensive look yet at the racial inequity of the coronavirus.A Times analysis published in late May found that Democrats were far more likely to live in counties that had been ravaged by the virus, while Republicans were more likely to live in counties that had been relatively unscathed.A team of New York Times journalists is also working to track every coronavirus case in the United States, and The Times has made its data open to the public.

    • 29 min
    ‘Their Goal Is the End of America’

    ‘Their Goal Is the End of America’

    What President Trump’s divisive speech at Mount Rushmore reveals about his re-election campaign.

    Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Missteps by a fractured campaign and a series of self-inflicted wounds added up to a very bad June for President Trump.In speeches at the White House and Mount Rushmore last weekend, the president promoted a version of the “American carnage” vision from his inaugural address.

    • 21 min
    Four New Insights About the Coronavirus

    Four New Insights About the Coronavirus

    Infection rates broke records across the United States over the holiday weekend, with many of the most severe surges in areas that reopened fastest. One thing that seems to have played a factor: transmission indoors, such as in restaurants and bars. We break down the risk, and look at what else scientists have learned about the coronavirus and how it spreads. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Many scientists have been saying for months that the coronavirus lingers in the air indoors, infecting those nearby. But the World Health Organization has been slow to agree.Black and Latino residents of the United States are nearly twice as likely to die from Covid-19 as their white neighbors, according to new data that provides the most comprehensive look yet at coronavirus patients in America.

    • 27 min
    What Went Wrong in Brazil

    What Went Wrong in Brazil

    Brazil has a long, distinguished history of successfully navigating public health crises. But in recent weeks, it has emerged as one of the world’s most severe coronavirus hot spots, second only to the United States. What went wrong? 

    Guest: Ernesto Londoño, The Times’s Brazil bureau chief

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Here’s an overview of what you need to know about the coronavirus in Brazil.The country’s pioneering responses to past health crises, including AIDS and Zika, won global praise.

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
208 Ratings

208 Ratings

PelosTercos ,

Amazing

This podcast is so interesting and you can download it an you can hear it wherever.

Hobie26 ,

Great news, awkward voices

The stories and information are top notch; the delivery by Barbaro and others on the show are strange. Why does Barbaro pause so awkwardly between words when delivering the news at the end of the show? Why does he sound normal with guests and then switch to William Shatner when telling us “the other news we need to know today”? Some of the guests, especially ESL NYTimes reporters, also sound like they’ve been coached into over-enunciation staccato-mode.

Robert from cancun ,

In love at the first try

This is my favorite podcast and it is so professional and full of passion in the news and show the truth

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