1,248 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.8 • 246 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The War in Tigray

    The War in Tigray

    This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.

    Just a few years ago, Ethiopia’s leader was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Now, the nation is in the grips of a civil war, with widespread reports of massacres and human rights abuses, and a looming famine that could strike millions in the northern region of Tigray.

    How did Ethiopia get here?

    Guest: Declan Walsh, the chief Africa correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 27 min
    Why Billionaires Pay So Little Tax

    Why Billionaires Pay So Little Tax

    Jeff Bezos, Michael Bloomberg, Elon Musk and George Soros are household names. They are among the wealthiest people in the United States.

    But a recent report by ProPublica has found another thing that separates them from regular Americans citizens: They have paid almost nothing in taxes.

    Why does the U.S. tax system let that happen?

    Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 27 min
    Apple’s Bet on China

    Apple’s Bet on China

    Apple built the world’s most valuable business by figuring out how to make China work for Apple.

    A New York Times investigation has found that the dynamic has now changed. China has figured out how to make Apple work for China.

    Guest: Jack Nicas, who covers technology from San Francisco for The New York Times. He is one of the reporters behind the investigation into Apple’s compromises in China.

    • 31 min
    From The Sunday Read Archives: ‘My Mustache, My Self’

    From The Sunday Read Archives: ‘My Mustache, My Self’

    During months of pandemic isolation, Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The New York Times, decided to grow a mustache.

    The reviews were mixed and predictable. He heard it described as “porny” and “creepy,” as well as “rugged” and “extra gay.”

    It was a comment on a group call, however, that gave him pause. Someone noted that his mustache made him look like a lawyer for the N.A.A.C.P.’s legal defense fund.

    “It was said as a winking correction and an earnest clarification — Y’all, this is what it is,” Wesley said. “The call moved on, but I didn’t. That is what it is: one of the sweetest, truest things anybody had said about me in a long time.”

    On today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Wesley Morris’s story about Blackness and the symbolic power of the mustache.

    • 38 min
    Day X, Part 3: Blind Spot 2.0

    Day X, Part 3: Blind Spot 2.0

    Franco A. is not the only far-right extremist in Germany discovered by chance. For over a decade, 10 murders in the country, including nine victims who were immigrants, went unsolved. The neo-Nazi group responsible was discovered only when a bank robbery went wrong.

    In this episode, we ask: Why has a country that spent decades atoning for its Nazi past so often failed to confront far-right extremism?

    • 40 min
    The Unlikely Pioneer Behind mRNA Vaccines

    The Unlikely Pioneer Behind mRNA Vaccines

    When she was at graduate school in the 1970s, Dr. Katalin Kariko learned about something that would become a career-defining obsession: mRNA.

    She believed in the potential of the molecule, but for decades ran up against institutional roadblocks. Then, the coronavirus hit and her obsession would help shield millions from a once-in-a-century pandemic.

    Today, a conversation with Dr. Kariko about her journey.

    Guest: Gina Kolata, a reporter covering science and medicine for The New York Times.

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
246 Ratings

246 Ratings

zinzir ,

Please no more coronavirus talk

This podcast is one of the most informative and beautifully designed, Micheal is an exceptionally empathetic interviewer, you will not be disappointed. However, please, I beg of y’all, stop contributing to the pandemic fatigue. The nyt newspaper print edition covers it thoroughly and beautifully, is it really necessary to have us listen to MORE coverage of this virus that absolutely everyone is terribly ghastly sick and tired of. I really really love this show though. Thank you to all who make it possible! :)

Hobie26 ,

Great news, awkward voices

The stories and information are top notch; the delivery by Barbaro and others on the show are strange. Why does Barbaro pause so awkwardly between words when delivering the news at the end of the show? Why does he sound normal with guests and then switch to William Shatner when telling us “the other news we need to know today”? Some of the guests, especially ESL NYTimes reporters, also sound like they’ve been coached into over-enunciation staccato-mode. The coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian crises came off as extremely biased. I’ll stick to Al Jazeera, the AP, Reuters and AFP for a more balanced perspective for the time being. I’ve unsubscribed.

zmonsalve ,

Great podcast!

But can we have some content in Spanish?

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