485 episodios

The Inquiry gets beyond the headlines to explore the trends, forces and ideas shaping the world.

The Inquiry BBC Podcasts

    • Noticias
    • 4.7 • 16 calificaciones

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The Inquiry gets beyond the headlines to explore the trends, forces and ideas shaping the world.

Escuchar en Apple Podcasts
Requiere suscripción y macOS 11.4 o una versión posterior

    Are synthetic opioids a global problem?

    Are synthetic opioids a global problem?

    An increasing number of people are dying from misuse of synthetic opioids. In 2022, the US recorded over 70,000 overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids. The government is spending billions to combat the effects of these super strength drugs.
    Synthetic opioids, such as Fentanyl, are made in laboratories by using materials derived from the opium poppy. China is a major hub for the production of synthetic opioids, where it then makes its way to North America through Mexican drug cartels.
    The lab-made drugs can be more deadly than the natural materials, but they are more easily accessible, and prevalence is rising across the world.
    In West Africa and the Middle East, tramadol is one of the most consumed synthetic drugs. The rise of synthetic opioids in the European market, which are being used as a substitute for a heroin shortage, is fuelling concern that these substances could lead to a rise in drug-related deaths.
    This week on The Inquiry, we’re asking are synthetic opioids a global problem?
    Contributors
    Ric Treble, Forensic chemist and advisor to the Government’s Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs
    Dr Angela Me, Chief of the Research and Trend Analysis Branch from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
    Ben Westhoff, author of Fentanyl, Inc and investigative journalist
    Dr Vanda Felbab-Brown is a senior fellow in the Strobe Talbott Center for Security, Strategy, and Technology in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings Institution
    Production team
    Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
    Producers: Vicky Carter and Matt Toulson
    Researcher: Ajai Singh
    Editor: Tara McDermott
    Technical Producer: Cameron Ward
    Production Co-ordinator: Liam Morrey
    Image credit: mikroman6 via Getty Images

    • 23 min
    How secure is Benjamin Netanyahu’s leadership?

    How secure is Benjamin Netanyahu’s leadership?

    Six months into Israel’s war in Gaza and with no sign of a ceasefire or breakthrough in securing the release of the 130 hostages, as yet unaccounted for, pressure is mounting on Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
    There have been widespread protests in Tel Aviv and across Israel. There have been calls both from home and abroad for an early election to be called. And Israel’s greatest ally, the United States has sharpened its rhetoric in the past few weeks over Israel’s conduct of the war, with President Biden now saying that he believes Benjamin Netanyahu is making ‘a mistake’ in his handling of it.
    For his part, the Israeli Prime Minister looks set to continue with his military offensive and has shown no indication so far that he is willing to step down or call an early election.
    So, on this week’s Inquiry, we’re asking ‘How secure is Benjamin Netanyahu’s leadership?’
    Contributors:
    Professor David Tal, the Yossi Harel Chair in Modern Israel Studies, University of Sussex, UK
    Natan Sachs, Director of the Centre for Middle East Policy, The Brookings Institution, Washington DC, USA
    Aaron David Miller, Senior Fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington DC, USA
    Professor Tamar Hermann, Senior Research Fellow, The Israel Democracy Institute, Jerusalem
    Presenter: Tanya Beckett
    Producer: Jill Collins
    Editor: Tara McDermott
    Technical Producer: Cameron Ward
    Production Co-ordinator: Liam Morrey
    Image credit: Reuters via BBC Images

    • 23 min
    Are we close to a breakthrough for Multiple Sclerosis?

    Are we close to a breakthrough for Multiple Sclerosis?

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease which can lead to loss of mobility and vision. Almost 3 million people worldwide are affected by it. There is no cure, but attempts are being made to accelerate the healing process with treatments to restore what the disease has damaged.
    At the same time, scientists have recently discovered a link between MS and a common virus that the majority of us carry in our bodies. It had been known for years that there was a link between Multiple Sclerosis and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). But then, a study finally proved the link.
    Now, trials are underway on potential vaccines against EBV and scientists are hopeful that this could be a gateway to preventing MS.
    This week on the Inquiry we are asking: Are we close to a breakthrough for Multiple Sclerosis?
    Contributors:
    Tim Coetzee, Chief Advocacy, Services & Science Officer for the National MS Society, US
    Tjalf Ziemssen, Professor of Clinical Neuroscience and Head of the Multiple Sclerosis Center and Neuroimmunological Laboratory, University Clinic Carl-Gustav Carus, Germany
    Jeffrey Huang, Associate Professor of Biology, Georgetown University, US
    Claire Shannon-Lowe, Associate Professor in Virology, Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy at the University of Birmingham, UK
    Production team:
    Presenter: Tanya Beckett
    Producer: Matt Toulson
    Researcher: Ajai Singh
    Editor: Tara McDermott
    Studio Manager: Hal Haines
    Production Co-ordinator: Liam Morrey
    Image Credit: Shidlovski\Getty

    • 22 min
    Is climate change impacting chocolate production?

    Is climate change impacting chocolate production?

    For centuries chocolate has had a global appeal, the key ingredient of this confectionery is derived from the dried and fully fermented seed of the Theobroma cacao, whose origins began in northern Amazonia. From this tree, both cocoa solids and cocoa butter can be extracted to form the basis of chocolate.
    Today, it’s the West African countries of Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana that produce the bulk of the world’s supply of cocoa beans. But in recent years hotter temperatures and shifts in rainfall patterns have impacted cocoa harvests particularly in this region. And now the global price of this key ingredient has roughly doubled since the start of last year, fuelling concern that demand could outweigh supply.

    Cocoa farming itself is mainly small scale and these farmers are at the bottom end of the value chain when it comes to profits. But whilst many of the major chocolate manufacturers do invest in the industry, with support for improved planting and harvesting techniques, farming sustainably is just one of a number of challenges that these small farmers face.
    So on this week’s Inquiry, we’re asking ‘Is climate change impacting chocolate production?’
    Contributors:
    Dr Katie Sampeck, British Academy Global Professor of Historical Archaeology, University of Reading, England
    Philip Antwi-Agyei, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana
    Steffany Bermúdez, Policy Advisor, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), Canada
    Yunusa Abubakar, Project Manager, International Cocoa Organisation (ICCO), Côte d’Ivoire
    Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
    Producer: Jill Collins
    Researcher: Matt Toulson
    Editor: Tara McDermott
    Technical Producer: Hal Haines
    Production Co-ordinator: Liam Morrey
    Image by grafvision via Getty Images

    • 23 min
    Will neighbouring countries follow El Salvador's lead on crime?

    Will neighbouring countries follow El Salvador's lead on crime?

    In February this year, El Salvador's president Nayib Bukele won re-election with nearly 85% of the vote. His flagship policy after he came to power in 2019 has been the mass arrest of thousands of alleged gang members, mainly young men.
    It is estimated that over 100,000 people are now behind bars as part of his crime crackdown. The round-ups have been hugely popular with El Salvador's people as it has improved security and neighbouring countries are taking note.
    But critics say following Bukele's approach could threaten democracy, not just in El Salvador but across the continent.

    So on this week’s Inquiry, we’re asking: Will neighbouring countries follow El Salvador's lead on crime?
    Contributors:
    Carlos Dada, director of El Faro, an online newspaper based in El Salvador
    Katherine Saunders-Hastings, a lecturer in Latin American Studies at the University of London's Institute of the Americas.
    Will Freeman, Fellow for Latin American Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, New York.
    Monica Pachon , a political scientist and professor at the University of the Andes in Bogotá, Colombia.
    Presenter: David Baker
    Producer: Farhana Haider
    Journalism Researcher: Matt Toulson
    Editor: Tara McDermott
    Technical Producer: Nicky Edwards
    Production Co-ordinator: Tim Fernley and Liam Morrey
    Image Credit:
    Alex Peña / Stringer via Getty Images

    • 23 min
    Is our future underground?

    Is our future underground?

    More than half of the world’s population currently lives in cities, and by 2050, the UN estimates that figure will rise to nearly 7 in 10 people. The world is also getting hotter, with heatwaves and wildfires becoming increasingly common.
    So how can we deal with the dual challenges of increasing urbanisation and extreme weather caused by climate change? Perhaps we should look downwards.
    For millennia, humans have taken refuge underground from the elements, predators and from war. Even today, bomb shelters exist under major cities like Beijing and Seoul. Many cities across the world have subway systems for easy transportation – and some are integrated seamlessly with below-ground business and shopping centres.
    But what are the future challenges for urban planners and architects in this subterranean space, and how can we overcome the social stigma against those who live underground?
    This week on the Inquiry, we ask: is our future underground?
    Contributors:
    Martin Dixon, trustee of Subterranea Britannica, a society devoted to the study and investigation of man-made and man-used underground places.
    Jacques Besner, architect and urban planner; co-founder and general manager of Associated Research Centres for Urban Underground Spaces.
    Antonia Cornaro co-chair of ITACUS, the International Tunnelling and Underground Space Association's Committee on Underground Space.
    Professor Clara Irazábal, Director of the Urban Studies and Planning Program at the University of Maryland, USA.
    Presenter: Tanya Beckett
    Producer: Ravi Naik
    Editor: Tara McDermott
    Researcher: Matt Toulson
    Production Coordinators : Janet Staples & Liam Morrey
    Photo by BEHROUZ MEHRI via Getty Images

    • 23 min

Reseñas de clientes

4.7 de 5
16 calificaciones

16 calificaciones

Ian Preston ,

Excellent every week

Excellent every week

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